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MR. DUNN’S WORLD HISTORY CLASS 4/19/2016

NOTES AND OUTLINE



UNIT 1: EUROPE DURING MEDIEVAL TIMES

Chapter 4:



Life in Medieval Towns

PREVIEW ASSIGNMENT: A Medieval Marketplace

(P. 21 GREY W/B AND P.42 OF TEXT)



  1. This is a marketplace in a 13th-century European town. Carefully analyze the image to try to figure out what it might have been like to live in a town in medieval Europe.

    • What interesting or important details do you see?

  2. This image has clues about the living conditions in medieval European towns.

    • What hypotheses can you make about living conditions, based on those clues?

  3. This image has clues about job opportunities available to people in med. European towns.

    • What hypotheses can you make about job opportunities, based on those clues?

  4. This image has clues about entertainment in medieval European towns.

    • What hypotheses can you make about entertainment, based on those clues?

  5. Now record your ideas. Complete Preview 4 in your Grey Student w/b p. 21. You will now explore what life was like in a medieval European town.

PREREADING CH4 - the graphic organizer

  1. Examine the illustration on page 43.

    • Where might a town like this have been located?

    • What objects do you see that people living in the town might have used?

    • What might they have been used for?

  2. Explain that this shows a street in a medieval European town. You will use this graphic organizer as you learn about various aspects of daily life in medieval European towns.


Reading notes for Understanding chapter 4

4.1 INTRODUCTION p. 43

  • This chapter is about DAILY LIFE during later Middle Ages 1000 to 1450C.E.

  • In ch2 you learned about the feudal manors/castles

  • By the 12 century towns began to grow

  • Most towns, like castles were surrounded by walls

  • Most signs were colorful pictures for shops + businesses

  • Most streets were very narrow, with very little light, +very dirty (no garbage collection), filled w/unpleasant smells


4.2 THE GROWTH OF MEDIEVAL TOWNS p. 44

  • In ancient times, town life was well established particularly in Greece + Rome as busy trading centers bet east & west

  • After fall of Rome people lived in scattered communities in the countryside

  • By High Middle Ages towns were growing again

    • Improvement in agriculture; Farmers were clearing forests; Adopting better farming methods; creating surplus of crops to sell in town markets

  • Revival of trade in seaport towns – Venice, Genoa re-established ties with the East

  • Best way to travel was by river – many towns established by rivers making trade easier

  • Merchants became permanent residents

  • Craft or trades people also settled in towns

  • Towns became wealthier with specialization

  • 1st towns generally part of DOMAIN - feudal lord

  • Growth led to independence – self-government

  • A royal CHARTER led to free towns - mayor

GUIDE TO READING NOTES CH 4

Read Section 4.2 on p.44 and answer the questions below. Then, before each group’s performance in class, read that section in your book and complete the corresponding notes.
4.2 The Growth of Medieval Towns


  1. Where were towns in medieval Europe often located, and why?




  • Towns were often located next to rivers, which made trade easier.




  1. What contributed to the growth of towns in medieval Europe?




  • Improved farming methods and the revival of trade with the east




  1. What rights did a charter give townspeople?




  • A charter allowed the members of a medieval town to govern themselves.


Student Handout 4.3 - Preparing an Interactive Dramatization about Guilds page 45


Work with your group to create an interactive dramatization about guilds. Follow the steps below. Have your teacher initial each step as you complete it.

____ Step 1: Review the roles. Your teacher will assign you a role. With your group, read the information below. Make sure everyone understands his or her responsibilities.

Historian: You will lead the group during Step 2. Make sure everyone understands and uses key historical information about guilds in the dramatization.

Director: You will lead the group during Step 3. Make sure the dramatization includes all of the required elements and that everyone is equally involved.

Props Master: You will lead the group during Step 4 as it organizes and gathers costumes and props. You are responsible for making sure the dramatization is as realistic as possible.

Host: You will lead the group during Step 5 as it rehearses its dramatization. During the presentation, you will invite audience members to participate and answer any questions they have.

____ Step 2: Learn about guilds. Carefully examine Transparency 4B: A Medieval Cobbler Shop to see what the image reveals about guilds in medieval Europe. Then take turns reading aloud the information about guilds in Section 4.3. Afterward, the Historian should lead a group discussion of the questions below. Use the discussion to complete the corresponding section of Reading Notes 4.3 in your Grey Workbook.

  1. What were guilds? Why were they established?

  2. How did a person become a member of a guild?

  3. What are some examples of craft guilds in medieval Europe?

  4. How did guilds help members and families of members?

___ Step 3: Create your dramatization. You must present a 3- to 5 minute interactive dramatization about guilds that involves you and four members of the audience. Your dramatization must make the audience feel as if they are observing members of a cobblers’ guild at work in a medieval German city. The Director should make sure everyone is equally involved in presenting the parts of your dramatization, in this order:

  1. HOST guten tag (pronounced goo-ten-TAHK). Tell them “we are members of a cobblers’ guild in a German city”, a guild is:________________

________________________________________________________________

This is our sign that hangs outside our shop and identifies our guild. “These are the types of goods that cobblers produce, such as shoes, boots, belts, and handbags. “



  1. COB 1 Ask: “would you like to buy a pair of custom-made shoes?”

(*Then, acting as a journeyman, have a visitor take off her or his shoe. Trace the outline of the visitor’s foot onto scrap paper, and)

COB 1 explains: “I will use this to create the “leather” sole of the new shoe. “

  1. COB 2 (guide a visitor as he or she cuts out the “sole” for the customer’s shoe.)

Explain: “a person becomes a member of a guild by:____________”

  1. COB 3 Have another member of your group, acting as an apprentice, “ask a visitor to help you clean up the shop.” Explain how “you are ‘paid’ for your service to the master craftsman in this shop.”

  2. COB 4 Have a member of your group, acting as a master craftsman, show your visitors a puncture wound on his hand that he got from a sharp needle. Explain that “the cobblers’ guild provided food to your family while the wound healed.”

  3. Pretend to step outside of your shop and show your visitors some of the other guilds in your city.

  4. HOST Ask if your visitors “have any questions?”, and answer them. “Thank them for coming”,and say goodbye using the German words auf wiedersehen (pronounced owf-VEE-der-zay-en).


SCRIPT 4.3

  1. HOST guten tag (pronounced goo-ten-TAHK). Tell them “we are members of a cobblers’ guild in a German city”, a guild is:_______

This is our sign that hangs outside our shop and identifies our guild. “These are the types of goods that cobblers produce, such as shoes, boots, belts, and handbags. “

  1. COB 1 Ask: “would you like to buy a pair of custom-made shoes?”

(*Then, acting as a journeyman, have a visitor take off her or his shoe. Trace the outline of the visitor’s foot onto scrap paper, and)

COB 1 explains: “I will use this to create the “leather” sole of the new shoe. “

  1. COB 2 (guide a visitor as he or she cuts out the “sole” for the customer’s shoe.)

Explain: “a person becomes a member of a guild by:____________”

  1. COB 3Have another member of your group, acting as an apprentice, ask a visitor to help you clean up the shop. Explain how you are “paid” for your service to the master craftsman in this shop.

  2. COB 4Have a member of your group, acting as a master craftsman, show your visitors a puncture wound on his hand that he got from a sharp needle. Explain that the cobblers’ guild provided food to your family while the wound healed.

  3. Pretend to step outside of your shop and show your visitors some of the other guilds in your city.

  4. HOST Ask if your visitors have any questions, and answer them. Thank them for coming, and say goodbye using the German words auf wiedersehen (pronounced owf-VEE-der-zay-en).

Student Handout 4.4 - Preparing an Interactive Dramatization about Trade and Commerce


Work with your group to create an interactive dramatization about trade and commerce. Follow the steps below. Have your teacher initial each step as you complete it.

____ Step 1: Review the roles. Your teacher will assign you a role. With your group, read the information below. Make sure everyone understands his or her responsibilities.



Historian: You will lead the group during Step 2. Make sure everyone understands and uses key historical information about trade and commerce in the dramatization.

Director: You will lead the group during Step 3. Make sure the dramatization includes all of the required elements and that everyone is equally involved.

Props Master: You will lead the group during Step 4 as it organizes and gathers costumes and props. You are responsible for making sure the dramatization is as realistic as possible.

Host: You will lead the group during Step 5 as it rehearses its dramatization. During the presentation, you will invite audience members to participate and answer any questions they have.

____ Step 2: Learn about trade and commerce. Carefully examine Transparency 4C: A Medieval Open Market to see what the image reveals about trade and commerce in medieval Europe. Then take turns reading aloud the information about trade and commerce in Section 4.4. Afterward, the Historian should lead a group discussion of the questions below. Use the discussion to complete the corresponding section of Reading Notes 4.4 in your Grey Workbook.

  1. What role did merchants play in the growth of medieval European towns?

  2. What were merchant fairs like?

  3. How did merchants become the most wealthy and powerful members of towns?

  4. How were Jews often mistreated in medieval Europe?

___ Step 3: Create your dramatization. You must present a 3- to 5minute interactive dramatization about trade and commerce that involves you and four members of the audience. Your dramatization must make the audience feel as if they are observing merchants gathered at a market in a medieval Flemish city. The Director should make sure everyone is equally involved in presenting the parts of your dramatization, in this order:

  1. Host-Greet your visitors by using

the Dutch word hoi (pronounced hoy). Tell them

We are merchants gathered at a market in a city in Flanders.”



  1. Host-Show your visitors a document signed by the king. Explain that:without permission from the king, we would be unable to do business at this market.”

  2. Trader1-One of you, acting as a salesperson, “show silks and spices that you have for sale.” Explain how “we acquired these goods by _______________________________________________________.”

  3. Trader2-One of you, acting as a moneylender, “do you need a loan?” to a visitor. Describe “moneylenders are often mistreated.” Pretend to withdraw some coins from a wooden box to make change for one of your visitors. “Here is your Change.”

  4. Trader3-One of you, acting as a grocer, pretends to sell your visitors Here is some cabbage and an eel, would you like anything else?”

  5. Trader4-Show your visitors a bill of sale from a transaction. Have 1 of them help you place “wax seal” upon the document to make it official.

  6. Trader5-Have one of your visitors pretend to use a balance scale to weigh two types of coins. Tell your visitors that “most merchants carry balance scales to weigh coins to determine their value.”

  7. Host-Ask your visitors if they “have any questions”, and answer them. “Thank you for coming”, and say goodbye using the

Dutch words tot ziens (pronounced TOHT-zeens)

___ Step 4: Brainstorm ideas for costumes and props. Your dramatization must be as realistic as possible. Before you begin creating costumes and props, the Props Master—using ideas from the group—should complete the checklists below. (Remember: During your presentation, the transparency will be projected on the screen behind your group.)

___ Step 5: Rehearse your dramatization. After you have created your costumes and props, make sure you can present your dramatization in 3 to 5 minutes. As you rehearse, the Host should make sure that

    • all group members are actively involved in the dramatization.

    • actors speak their lines loudly, clearly, and at the right time.

    • actors use costumes and props appropriately.

    • all actors know when and how visitors will participate in the dramatization.

SCRIPT 4.4

  1. Host - Greet your visitors by using

the Dutch word hoi (pronounced hoy). Tell them

We are merchants gathered at a market in a city in Flanders.”



  1. Host - Show your visitors a document signed by the king. Explain that:without permission from the king, we would be unable to do business at this market.”

  2. Trader1 - One of you, acting as a salesperson, “show silks and spices that you have for sale.” Explain how “we acquired these goods by _______________________________________________________.”

  3. Trader2 - One of you, acting as a moneylender, “do you need a loan?” to a visitor. Describe “moneylenders are often mistreated.” Pretend to withdraw some coins from a wooden box to make change for one of your visitors. “Here is your Change.”

  4. Trader3 - One of you, acting as a grocer, pretends to sell your visitors Here is some cabbage and an eel, would you like anything else?”

  5. Trader4 - Show your visitors a bill of sale from a transaction. Have one of them help you place a “wax seal” upon the document to make it official.

  6. Trader5 - Have one of your visitors pretend to use a balance scale to weigh two types of coins. Tell your visitors that “most merchants carry balance scales to weigh coins to determine their value.”

  7. Host-Ask your visitors if they “have any questions”, and answer them. “Thank you for coming”, and say goodbye using the Dutch words tot ziens (pronounced TOHT-zeens)

Student Handout 4.5 - Preparing an Interactive Dramatization about Homes and Households


Work with your group to create an interactive dramatization about homes and households. Follow the steps below. Have your teacher initial each step as you complete it.

____ Step 1: Review the roles. Your teacher will assign you a role. With your group, read the information below. Make sure everyone understands his or her responsibilities.

Historian: You will lead the group during Step 2. Make sure everyone understands and uses key historical information about homes and households in the dramatization.

Director: You will lead the group during Step 3. Make sure the dramatization includes all of the required elements and that everyone is equally involved.

Props Master: You will lead the group during Step 4 as it organizes and gathers costumes and props. You are responsible for making sure the dramatization is as realistic as possible.

Host: You will lead the group during Step 5 as it rehearses its dramatization. During the presentation, you will invite audience members to participate and answer any questions they have.

____ Step 2: Learn about homes and households. Carefully examine Transparency 4D: A Medieval Family at Home to see what the image reveals about homes and households in medieval Europe. Then take turns reading aloud the information about homes and households in Section 4.5. Afterward, the Historian should lead a group discussion of the questions below. Use the discussion to complete the corresponding section of Reading Notes 4.5 in your Grey Workbook.

  1. What did the homes in medieval European towns look like?

  2. Why were the homes of most town dwellers uncomfortable?

  3. Why was growing up in medieval towns difficult?

  4. How were the lives of medieval girls different from those of modern girls?

___ Step 3: Create your dramatization . You must present a 3- to 5minute interactive dramatization about homes and households that involves you and four members of the audience. You will use sound effects from CD Track 3, “El Grillo (The Cricket),” during your presentation. Your dramatization must make the audience feel as if they are observing a family gathered in the home of a noble living in a city in medieval Italy. The Director should make sure everyone is equally involved in presenting the parts of your dramatization, in this order:

  1. Host-Greet your visitors by using the Italian

wordsbuon giorno (pronounced bwohn-JOR-noh).”Explain that “you have come to the home of a wealthy merchant and his family in Italy.”

  1. Host-Show your visitors a drawing of the floor plan of your house. Explain how “the houses of ordinary people are different from yours.”

  2. Person1-Tell your visitors “Please sit at our table.” Ask one visitor to “Please help my servant remove some bread from my oven.” Then serve your visitors bread and other food items you have prepared.

  3. Person2-Have your guests “Please help my servant clear the table.” Have them pretend “go ahead and throw the food scraps to the dogs and dump extra liquids into the street outside our home.”

  4. Person3-One of you, pretend to perform a musical piece on the lute by playing along with CD Track 3.

  5. Person4-One of you, show your visitors a painting you are creating. Explain how “our family’s wealth allows me to participate in such activities.”

  6. Person5-One of you, pretending to be an unmarried 13-year-old girl, show your visitors some letters you have received from suitors. Ask your visitors “Please read my letters and identify which suitor you think would make the best husband for me.”

  7. Host-Ask your visitors if they “Do you have any questions?”, and answer them. “Thank you for coming”, and say goodbye using the Italian word “arrivederci (pronounced ar-E-vay-DER-che).”


SCRIPT 4.5

  1. Host-Greet your visitors by using the Italian

wordsbuon giorno (pronounced bwohn-JOR-noh).”Explain that “you have come to the home of a wealthy merchant and his family in Italy.”

  1. Host-Show your visitors a drawing of the floor plan of your house. Explain how “the houses of ordinary people are different from yours.”

  2. Person1-Tell your visitors “Please sit at our table.” Ask one visitor to “Please help my servant remove some bread from my oven.” Then serve your visitors bread and other food items you have prepared.

  3. Person2-Have your guests “Please help my servant clear the table.” Have them pretend “go ahead and throw the food scraps to the dogs and dump extra liquids into the street outside our home.”

  4. Person3-One of you, pretend to perform a musical piece on the lute by playing along with CD Track 3.

  5. Person4-One of you, show your visitors a painting you are creating. Explain how “our family’s wealth allows me to participate in such activities.”

  6. Person5-One of you, pretending to be an unmarried 13-year-old girl, show your visitors some letters you have received from suitors. Ask your visitors “Please read my letters and identify which suitor you think would make the best husband for me.”

  7. Host-Ask your visitors if they “Do you have any questions?”, and answer them. “Thank you for coming”, and say goodbye using the Italian word “arrivederci (pronounced ar-E-vay-DER-che).”

Student Handout 4.6 - Preparing an Interactive Dramatization about Disease & Medical Treatment


Work with your group to create an interactive dramatization about disease and medical treatment. Follow the steps below. Have your teacher initial each step as you complete it.

____ Step 1: Review the roles. Your teacher will assign you a role. With your group, read the info below. Make sure everyone understands their responsibilities.

Historian: You will lead the group during Step 2. Make sure everyone understands and uses key historical information about disease and medical treatment in the dramatization.

Director: You will lead the group during Step 3. Make sure the dramatization includes all of the required elements and that everyone is equally involved.

Props Master: You will lead the group during Step 4 as it organizes and gathers costumes and props. You are responsible for making sure the dramatization is as realistic as possible.

Host: You will lead the group during Step 5 as it rehearses its dramatization. During the presentation, you will invite audience members to participate and answer any questions they have.

____ Step 2: Learn about disease and medical treatment. Carefully examine Transparency 4E: A Medieval Doctor’s Office to see what the image reveals about medical treatment in medieval Europe. Then take turns reading aloud the information about disease and medical treatment in Section 4.6. Afterward, the Historian should lead a group discussion of the questions below. Use the discussion to complete the corresponding section of Reading Notes 4.6 in your Grey Workbook.

  1. How did unhealthy living conditions and limited medical knowledge affect life in medieval European towns?

  2. What were some common diseases in medieval Europe?

  3. What were some common practices used by medieval doctors?

  4. What group was sometimes blamed when an outbreak of a disease occurred?

___ Step 3: Create your dramatization. You must present a 3- to 5minute interactive dramatization about disease and medical treatment that involves you and four members of the audience. Your dramatization must make the audience feel as if they are observing doctors treating patients in a medieval Spanish city. The Director should make sure that everyone is equally involved in presenting the parts of your dramatization, in this order:

  1. Host-Greet your visitors by using the using Spanish words

Buenos Dias (pronounced BYWAY-nohs DEE-ahs).

  1. Explain that they have entered a doctor’s office in a Spanish city.

  2. Examine your visitors and pretend to identify their various ailments - including a fever, a bruise, a rotten tooth, and persistent cough.

  3. Ask the visitor with a “fever”what astrological sign he or she was born under?” Then explain why “you will consult a star chart before treating him or her. “

  4. Pretend to place a poultice (a paste made of herbs) on the “bruise” that one of your visitors has. Explain howyou use herbs such as marjoram to make poultices. “

  5. Offer to pull out the “rotten tooth” that one of your visitors has. If they refuse to have this done, pretend to create solution of vinegar, oil, and sulfur. Explain thatthis may relive some of the pain.

  6. Pretend to place a leech on the forearm of the visitor with the “persistent cough.” Explain whydoctors use the technique of bloodletting to ___________________________________________ . “

  7. Offer your visitors “some wormwood (a strong-smelling plant) to place on their clothes to repel fleas. “

  8. Host-Ask your visitors if “they have any questions?”, and answer them. Thank them for coming, and say goodbye using the

Spanish word adios (pronounce ah-dee-OHS).

SCRIPT 4.6

  1. Host-Greet your visitors by using the using Spanish words

Buenos Dias (pronounced BYWAY-nohs DEE-ahs).

  1. Explain that they have entered a doctor’s office in a Spanish city.

  2. Examine your visitors and pretend to identify their various ailments - including a fever, a bruise, a rotten tooth, and persistent cough.

  3. Ask the visitor with a “fever”what astrological sign he or she was born under?” Then explain why “you will consult a star chart before treating him or her. “

  4. Pretend to place a poultice (a paste made of herbs) on the “bruise” that one of your visitors has. Explain howyou use herbs such as marjoram to make poultices. “

  5. Offer to pull out the “rotten tooth” that one of your visitors has. If they refuse to have this done, pretend to create solution of vinegar, oil, and sulfur. Explain thatthis may relive some of the pain.

  6. Pretend to place a leech on the forearm of the visitor with the “persistent cough.” Explain whydoctors use the technique of bloodletting to _____________________________________ . “

  7. Offer your visitors “some wormwood (a strong-smelling plant) to place on their clothes to repel fleas. “

  8. Host-Ask your visitors if “they have any questions?”, and answer them. Thank them for coming, and say goodbye using the Spanish word adios (pronounce ah-dee-OHS).


Student Handout 4.7 - Preparing an Interactive Dramatization about Crime and Punishment


Work with your group to create an interactive dramatization about crime and punishment. Follow the steps below. Have your teacher initial each step as you complete it.

____ Step 1: Review the roles. Your teacher will assign you a role. With your group, read the info below. Make sure everyone understands their responsibilities.

Historian: You will lead the group during Step 2. Make sure everyone understands and uses key historical information about crime and punishment in the dramatization.

Director: You will lead the group during Step 3. Make sure the dramatization includes all of the required elements and that everyone is equally involved.

Props Master: You will lead the group during Step 4 as it organizes and gathers costumes and props. You are responsible for making sure the dramatization is as realistic as possible.

Host: You will lead the group during Step 5 as it rehearses its dramatization. During the presentation, you will invite audience members to participate and answer any questions they have.

____ Step 2: Learn about crime and punishment. Carefully examine Transparency 4F: A Medieval Judge Arbitrates a Case to see what the image reveals about crime and punishment in medieval Europe. Then take turns reading aloud the information about crime and punishment in Section 4.7. Afterward, the Historian should lead a group discussion of the questions below. Use the discussion to complete the corresponding section of Reading Notes 4.7 in your Grey Workbook.

  1. Why were towns in medieval Europe such dangerous places?

  2. What were two methods for deciding the guilt or innocence of accused criminals in the Early Middle Ages?

  3. What were some ways criminals were punished in medieval Europe?

  4. How did the way in which those accused of crimes were treated begin to improve in the 12th century?

___ Step 3: Create your dramatization. You must present a 3- to 5minute interactive dramatization about crime and punishment that involves you and four members of the audience. Your dramatization must make the audience feel as if they are observing a legal court in a medieval English city. The Director should make sure that everyone is equally involved in presenting the parts of your dramatization, in this order:

  1. Host-Greet your visitors by using

the Latin word salvete (pronounced SAHL-way-tay).

  • Explain that “you have gathered here to administer the law in an English city and that you are speaking in Latin because it is the official language used in legal matters. “

  1. Have your visitors pretend to read from a court record that describes some serious crimes and how they are punished.”

  2. One of you, acting as a person accused of stealing, throw yourself at the feet of the king’s justice (judge) & explainwhy you are innocent.”

  3. One of you, acting as the king’s justice, pretend to interview the accused person “about the crime he or she is accused of committing.”

  4. Ask your visitors “to determine the accused person’s innocence or guilt.”

  5. Take your visitors outside & show them the stocks. Explain that “the stocks are used to punish people of minor crimes as drunkenness and cursing.” Have your visitors pretend to pick up pieces of rotten vegetables. Tell them that “while trapped in the stocks, a person is exposed to a jeering crowd and pelted with rotten vegetables.”

  6. Take your visitors to your town’s gallows, where condemned criminals are hanged. Describe some of the ways in which those who committed serious crimes are punished were: ________________________________________________________

  7. Host-Ask if your “visitors have any questions” and answer them.

Thank them for coming, and say goodbye using

the Latin word valete (pronounced WAH-lay-tay).



SCRIPT 4.7

  1. Host-Greet your visitors by using

the Latin word salvete (pronounced SAHL-way-tay).

  • Explain that “you have gathered here to administer the law in an English city and that you are speaking in Latin because it is the official language used in legal matters. “

  1. Have your visitors pretend to read from a court record that describes some serious crimes and how they are punished.”

  2. One of you, acting as a person accused of stealing, throw yourself at the feet of the king’s justice (judge) & explainwhy you are innocent.”

  3. One of you, acting as the king’s justice, pretend to interview the accused person “about the crime he or she is accused of committing.”

  4. Ask your visitors “to determine the accused person’s innocence or guilt.”

  5. Take your visitors outside & show them the stocks. Explain that “the stocks are used to punish people of minor crimes as drunkenness and cursing.” Have your visitors pretend to pick up pieces of rotten vegetables. Tell them that “while trapped in the stocks, a person is exposed to a jeering crowd and pelted with rotten vegetables.”

  6. Take your visitors to your town’s gallows, where condemned criminals are hanged. Describe some of the ways in which those who committed serious crimes are punished were: _______________________________________________________________

  7. Host-Ask if your “visitors have any questions” and answer them. Thank them for coming, and say goodbye using

the Latin word valete (pronounced WAH-lay-tay).

Student Handout 4.8 - Preparing an Interactive Dramatization About Leisure and Entertainment


Work with your group to create an interactive dramatization about leisure and entertainment. Follow the steps below. Have your teacher initial each step as you complete it.

____ Step 1: Review the roles. Your teacher will assign you a role. With your group, read the info below. Make sure everyone understands their responsibilities.

Historian: You will lead the group during Step 2. Make sure everyone understands and uses key historical information about leisure and entertainment in the dramatization.

Director: You will lead the group during Step 3. Make sure the dramatization includes all of the required elements and that everyone is equally involved.

Props Master: You will lead the group during Step 4 as it organizes and gathers costumes and props. You are responsible for making sure the dramatization is as realistic as possible.

Host: You will lead the group during Step 5 as it rehearses its dramatization. During the presentation, you will invite audience members to participate and answer any questions they have.

____ Step 2: Learn about leisure and entertainment. Carefully examine Transparency 4G: A Medieval Mystery Play to see what the image reveals about leisure and entertainment. Then take turns reading aloud the information about leisure and entertainment in Section 4.8. Afterward, the Historian should lead a group discussion of the questions below. Use the discussion to complete the corresponding section of Reading Notes 4.8 in your Grey Workbook.

  1. What were some games that were popular with children in medieval Europe?

  2. What were some leisure activities enjoyed by adults in medieval Europe?

  3. What was the difference between mystery plays and miracle plays?

  4. How did the church’s attitude toward mystery and miracle plays differ from that of most townspeople?

___ Step 3: Create your dramatization. You must present a 3- to 5minute interactive dramatization about leisure and entertainment that involves you and four members of the audience. You will use music from CD Track 4, “Pavane: La Venissienne,” during your presentation. Your dramatization must make the audience feel as if they are observing people gathered at a fair in a medieval French city. The Director should make sure that everyone is equally involved in presenting the parts of your dramatization, in this order:

  1. Host-Greet your visitors by using

the French word bonjour (pronounced BONH-joor).

  • Explain that “they have come to a fair in France where people can have fun and be entertained.”

  1. Teach your visitors how to play bowling hoops. Describe “some other games that are popular with children were: ____________________.”

  2. One of you, show your visitors a lump on your head that you received while playing soccer. Explain “that soccer has been banned in some villages because the games have become too violent.”

  3. Hand one of your visitors a pair of dice. Ask the visitor to “roll the dice and predict the sum that will be displayed.” Explain how “people like to make bets on which numbers they throw.”

  4. Show your visitors a chessboard, and teach them how to move some of the pieces. Explain that “this is a newer game that came to Europe from the Middle East (or Southwest Asia).“

  5. Play CD Track 4, and encourage your visitors to dance with you to the music. Stand next to your partner. Each of you raise a hand above your shoulder so that your palm is touching your partner’s. Then move in a circular pattern to the rhythm of the music.

  6. One of you, acting as a mummer, pretend to be the dragon that battled St. George in a play. Describe how “plays are popular with people in medieval Europe.”

  7. Host-Ask your visitors “if they have any questions?”, and answer them. Thank your visitors for coming, and say goodbye using

the French words au revoir (pronounced O-ruh-VWAH)

SCRIPT 4.8

  1. Host-Greet your visitors by using

the French word bonjour (pronounced BONH-joor).

  • Explain that “they have come to a fair in France where people can have fun and be entertained.”



  1. Teach your visitors how to play bowling hoops. Describe “some other games that are popular with children were: ____________________.”



  1. One of you, show your visitors a lump on your head that you received while playing soccer. Explain “that soccer has been banned in some villages because the games have become too violent.”



  1. Hand one of your visitors a pair of dice. Ask the visitor to “roll the dice and predict the sum that will be displayed.” Explain how “people like to make bets on which numbers they throw.”

  2. Show your visitors a chessboard, and teach them how to move some of the pieces. Explain that “this is a newer game that came to Europe from the Middle East (or Southwest Asia). “



  1. Play CD Track 4, and encourage your visitors to dance with you to the music. Stand next to your partner. Each of you raise a hand above your shoulder so that your palm is touching your partner’s. Then move in a circular pattern to the rhythm of the music.



  1. One of you, acting as a mummer, pretend to be the dragon that battled St. George in a play. Describe how “plays are popular with people in medieval Europe.”



  1. Host-Ask your visitors “if they have any questions?”, and answer them. Thank your visitors for coming, and say goodbye using

the French words au revoir (pronounced O-ruh-VWAH)

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