Note: See also the files: rattan-msg, tournaments-msg, melee-tactics-art, armor-msg, p-armor-msg, swords-msg, axes-msg, Shield-Balanc-art, w-t-shields-art, Sword-Fighting-art, wood-bending-msg, wood-msg



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SCA and period shields.
NOTE: See also the files: rattan-msg, tournaments-msg, melee-tactics-art, armor-msg, p-armor-msg, swords-msg, axes-msg, Shield-Balanc-art, W-T-Shields-art, Sword-Fighting-art, wood-bending-msg, wood-msg.
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This file is part of a collection of files called Stefan's Florilegium. These files are available on the Internet at: http://www.florilegium.org
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From: whheydt at pbhya.PacBell.COM (Wilson Heydt)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Shield construction

Date: 13 Apr 93 18:10:00 GMT

Organization: Pacific * Bell, San Ramon, CA
parr at acs.ucalgary.ca (Charles Parr) writes:

>Currently my shields, while durable and (if I do say so myself)

>very attractive, weigh 15-16lbs. Since period heaters are

>estimated (accounting for centuries of drying out) to have

>weighed 8-9lbs at the most, I would dearly like to make something

>attractive, period, and *light*.


Get to a local lumber yard and buy some Linden. It's remarkably light,

tough.... and period.


--Hal

Hal Ravn, West Kingdom

Wilson H. Heydt, Jr., Albany, CA 94706, 510/524-8321 (home)

--


Hal Heydt |

Analyst, Pacific*Bell | If you think the system is working,

510-823-5447 | Ask someone who's waiting for a prompt.

whheydt at pbhya.PacBell.COM |

From: 00mjstum at leo.bsuvc.bsu.edu (Matthew J. Stum)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Shield construction

Date: 13 Apr 93 20:15:49 GMT


parr at acs.ucalgary.ca (Charles Parr) writes:

> Currently my shields, while durable and (if I do say so myself)

> very attractive, weigh 15-16lbs. Since period heaters are

> estimated (accounting for centuries of drying out) to have

> weighed 8-9lbs at the most, I would dearly like to make something

> attractive, period, and *light*.


I've just started doing some research on the Viking center-grips and

come up with some startling facts (to me, anyway). As you know, these

were flat circular shields made by butting planks together and rimming

the whole thing with either leather or metal. Three reenforcing bands

were placed on the back to make them "legal" for war, according to

some Norse Law that I can't finger off of the top of my head.


What I _didn't_ realize is that they were "nearly a meter wide."

Another source puts them at "30 to 40 inches in diameter". Yikes! My

little 24" center-grip falls quite short. I wondered about the weight

until I read that they were made of limewood (?) and only _one_fifth_

of an inch thick.
The only other construction besides the shield boss, handle, three

bands, and rimming was a coat of paint... usually red, black, yellow,

or white (?)... and less often blue and green. (At least that's what

memory tells me.)


Oh, wait, let's not forget the shoulder strap that allowed them to carry

the thing on their backs...


I'd love to make one of these for an A&S competition, but I'd also like

to _use_ it. I wonder about the durability, though... and if that was

a purposeful design...

--


Matt Stum Gwydion ap Myrddin Ball State University

00mjstum at bsuvc.bsu.edu Shire of Afonlyn, MK Muncie, IN USA

Apr 21 15:53:38 CDT 1993

From: dgreen at athena (David Greenebaum)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Shield construction

Date: 14 Apr 1993 16:51:36 GMT
Hello from Bjalfi!
Quoth Gwydion:

>I've just started doing some research on the Viking center-grips and

>come up with some startling facts (to me, anyway). As you know, these

>were flat circular shields made by butting planks together and rimming

>the whole thing with either leather or metal. Three reenforcing bands

>were placed on the back to make them "legal" for war, according to

>some Norse Law that I can't finger off of the top of my head.

>What I _didn't_ realize is that they were "nearly a meter wide."

>Another source puts them at "30 to 40 inches in diameter". Yikes! My

>little 24" center-grip falls quite short. I wondered about the weight

>until I read that they were made of limewood (?) and only _one_fifth_

>of an inch thick.

>[deletion]

>I'd love to make one of these for an A&S competition, but I'd also like

>to _use_ it. I wonder about the durability, though... and if that was

>a purposeful design...


It was. The shields weren't meant to be all that durable--the sagas

mention duels where the combattants go through three or four shields

each. The advantage of having a thin limewood shield (limewood is also

called linden, by the way) rimmed with leather, is that if your opponent's

sword bites into the edge, you can twist the shield and disarm your

opponent. Either you'll wrench the sword from his hand, or you might

bend or break it. (Some of the swords Norsemen used were not all that

high quality--there's a scene, I think it's in Laxdaela saga, where a

man fighting off a bunch of attackers has to keep straightening his

sword beneath his foot.) The shields were not much protection against

spears or polearms; many is the description of a thrown spear piercing

both shield and bearer, and pikes and halberds likewise.


--------------------- Bjalfi Thordharson/College of St. Katherine/Province of

|\ | |\ |\ |// | the Mists/Principality of the Mists/West Kingdom

| > | |\\ | \ |/ | David Greenebaum/University of California/Berkeley, CA

|< | | \ | | | dgreen at athena.berkeley.edu, dgreen at garnet.berkeley.edu

| > | | | | |

|/ | | | | | "I make mistakes, but I am on the side of good -- by

--------------------- accident and happenchance." -- the Golux

From: odlin at reed.edu (Iain Odlin)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Shield construction

Date: 15 Apr 93 05:56:12 GMT

Organization: The Stuffed Animal Trauma Team (We're Trained Professionals)


dgreen at athena (David Greenebaum) writes:

>the sagas mention duels where the combattants go through three or four shields

>each.
These were the "Holmgang"s. Ritual one-on-one combat. The breaking of the

shields (held, apparently, by someone other than the combatant, unless I'm

reading wrong...) was a step in the ritual, meant -- I'd guess -- to show

how vigourous the fighters are.


>(Some of the swords Norsemen used were not all that

>high quality--there's a scene, I think it's in Laxdaela saga, where a

>man fighting off a bunch of attackers has to keep straightening his

>sword beneath his foot.)


Laxdaela Saga, page 174 of the Magnusson and Palsson translation: "Kjartan's

blows were hard but his sword was of little use, and he was always having to

put it under his foot to straighten it." Good memory.
------------------------- Iain Odlin, odlin at reed.edu -------------------------

10 Crosby Street, Level 3, Portland ME 04103

--------- "Uncertainty is the normal state. You're nobody special." ---------

From: jab2 at stl.stc.co.uk (Jennifer Ann Bray)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Viking shield boss construction

Date: 5 May 93 11:30:10

Organization: STC Technology Ltd., London Road, Harlow, UK.


As far as I know the Vikings did just beat shield bosses out. I suppose with

practice you get to be a lot better at metal bashing and deeper bosses

become more of a practical option.

I have seen a tiny but deep boss in Liverpool Museum that had a curve

like a tennis ball but showed no signs of a seam anywhere. I don't

know how soft and malleable the metal was that it was formed from, but

when I have seen craftsmen beating out shield bosses by hand they

prefer to have a fire handy and spend more time throwing the bosses in

the fire to get rid of the tempering than they do actually hitting the

things. Apparently you work harden the metal as you bash it into

shape, so you have to constantly re-soften it

I am in a Viking reenactment society and we tend to cheat and use

spun or pressed steel bosses which are mass produced in various

patterns. (One trader persuaded a car plant to produce some using the

steel cases intended for the back of the car's headlights, if they

left out the hole for the bulb they were perfect!) Spun bosses aren't

as good as the pressed ones because you have to get rid of the

spinning marks which show up as a mass of concentric rings.


Jennifer
Vanaheim Vikings

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

From: ddfr at quads.uchicago.edu (david director friedman)

Subject: Shields, Visitors, Norms or Exceptions (cooking)

Organization: University of Chicago

Date: Thu, 20 May 1993 03:56:16 GMT


Shields
Someone who was asking about Turkish shields also asked about how to

make a concave/convex round shield. One way is to start with a metal

disk (I used the lid from a metal drum, I presume originally intended

for storing something). Procure a ball peen hammer, a pair of

earplugs, and something you can rest the disk on. I think I used a

garbage can or equivalent to support it around the edge, but I

suspect one could also use an ordinary anvil under where you were

pounding.


You start at the center and pound the metal in a tight spiral. This

stretches the metal, making it bulge out. Eventually you have a

convex round shield to play with for a while and eventually give to

your Norse blood brother; I don't know if Asbjorn still has it or not.


Tuomas Viljanen mentions the Adarga. Somewhere I read a discussion of

what it was made of. As I remember, it was the hide of a specific

animal, possibly a variety of antelope. The question was of interest

because the Adarga was supposedly famous for being a very light,

strong shield.
David/Cariadoc

From: jab2 at stl.stc.co.uk (Jennifer Ann Bray)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Homemade rivets?

Date: 31 Aug 93 15:42:58

Organization: STC Technology Ltd., London Road, Harlow, UK.


I fight with a viking centre grip shield. The boss is held in place

with "rivets" they are made from coach bolts. The front of the shield

has the bolt head which is a nice domed shape. Mine came with the

makers name cast on the surface, but a few whacks with a lump hammer

fixed that!

I saw an original viking shield boss a couple of years ago whilst

helping out with an exhibition. the rivets were round headed and domed

and looked just like a coach bolt head, so I don't see why you

shouldn't "fake it and use bolts" just use the right sort and leave

off the nuts like I did.

To use as a rivet saw the bolt to the required length. I can't

remember whether you soften it by heating 'till cherry red then

cooling with a water quench or by letting it cool slowly, but I can

remember heating it on the gas cooker 'till it was cherry red: I held

it in a pair of bits of wood which got rather charred but didn't

collapse. Your propane torch should do fine.

When your coachbolt/rivet has been treated to soften it, cut a cross in

the end with a hacksaw: this will make it a lot easier to start

spreading the rivet. It doesn't need to be very deep: 1/8 of an inch

will do, it's just enough to get it started.

You need something solid underneath the rivet when you're hammering,

bits of old engine make nice emergency anvils if you can't get a

suitable lump of metal elsewhere.

Make sure your handle isn't round in cross section. I've fought with

these and you can't stop them flapping from side to side. They're fine

in a shield wall, but once you're on your own you want more control. A

squashed oval cross section is my favourite.

Where the wood is cut away around the boss get a wood rasp and slope

the edges: if you have a right angle cut it will clobber your wrist

eventually.

The best rim material I have found so far is rawhide. You get the

doggy chews that are shaped sort of like a bone made out of rawhide

knotted at both ends. Soak overnight in water to soften, unknot it and

you have several rawhide strips per doggy chew. Whilst it is still

soft nail over your shield rim using blued steel tacks. Stretch the

rawhide as you nail it (this is important as it goes crinkly if you

don't stretch it enough) The rawhide dries to a really tough

protective edge. I have been fighting with a shield made of heavy duty

marine plywood (13 ply) it is edged with doggy chews and has a steel

boss. I have used the same shield for 5 years and last weekend for the

first time one of the rawhide strips split after someone hooked an axe

in it. This was a 2 handed axe and we had a tug of war with it hooked

in my shield. The rawhide split slightly where the tip of the axe was

hooked in it, but it didn't give up altogether.

We fight with blunt metal weapons, so I would think the rawhide would

hold up longer against rattan.


I have tried out iron bound shield and I'm not convinced they are

worth the effort. They are much heavier and the edging is lethal if it

does come loose in a fight. Leather is not as tough as rawhide, and

even veg. tanned leather isn't as stretchy when wet, so you always get

a crinkly edge.
You didn't mention painting it, but there's a report called three

viking graves from the isle of man" by Bersu and Wilson which has a

fragment of an original shield with the pattern still visible.

If you want to talk any more about viking shields please email me. The

society I am in usually fights with centre grip round shields, so if I

can't answer any questions, I might be able to find someone who can.


Jennifer

Vanaheim Vikings

(If you haven't figured it out from the stuff above, I'm not SCA but I

was passing by the Rialto & thought I'd stop for a chat)

From: harald at matt.ksu.ksu.edu (Harold Kraus Jr)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Homemade rivets?

Date: 31 Aug 1993 12:36:22 -0500

Organization: Kansas State University
The good Jennifer writes:
>............................................................

>To use as a rivet saw the bolt to the required length. I can't

>remember whether you soften it by heating 'till cherry red then

>cooling with a water quench or by letting it cool slowly, but ....

>..........................................................
For steel, it is cool slowly, allowing the iron crystals time to

sort out their kinks and grow larger. For my part, I find that bolts

mild (soft) enough to cut with a hacksaw are mild enough to peen

into a rivet head. Make sure you peen your rivet over a closely

fitting a rivet.
Harald Isenross, Spinning Winds, Calontir, harald at matt.ksu.ksu.edu

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

From: joakimr at ifi.uio.no (Joakim Ruud)

Subject: Re: Homemade rivets?

Organization: Dept. of Informatics, University of Oslo, Norway

Date: Wed, 1 Sep 1993 07:15:50 GMT


> I saw an original viking shield boss a couple of years ago whilst

> helping out with an exhibition. the rivets were round headed and domed

> and looked just like a coach bolt head, so I don't see why you

> shouldn't "fake it and use bolts" just use the right sort and leave

> off the nuts like I did.

> To use as a rivet saw the bolt to the required length. I can't

> remember whether you soften it by heating 'till cherry red then

> cooling with a water quench or by letting it cool slowly, but I can

> remember heating it on the gas cooker 'till it was cherry red: I held

> it in a pair of bits of wood which got rather charred but didn't

> collapse. Your propane torch should do fine.
What's the point of going to all that trouble, when there are iron rivets

available...? (at least here in Norway...)


> When your coachbolt/rivet has been treated to soften it, cut a cross in

> the end with a hacksaw: this will make it a lot easier to start

> spreading the rivet. It doesn't need to be very deep: 1/8 of an inch

> will do, it's just enough to get it started.

> You need something solid underneath the rivet when you're hammering,

> bits of old engine make nice emergency anvils if you can't get a

> suitable lump of metal elsewhere.
I find that riveting on a harder surface than the rivet itself causes the

rivet head to be deformed. Use a surface of just the same hardness, or

slightliy softer (thick copper or iron(soft)). This way, the rivet head will

retain its dome-shape...


Jokke

From: jschmidt at oolong.Tymnet.COM (John Schmidt)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: The Shield Wall From Hell

Date: 12 Nov 1993 21:26:53 GMT

Organization: BT North America (Tymnet)


In article v081lu33 at ubvms.cc.buffalo.edu (Ken Mondschein) writes:

>

> I agree with the fellow who said something about halbreds: when faced



>with a shield wall-attrition battle, it seems a valuable asset to be able to

>hit around corners.


Hmm. The strongest point for axes (pole, great or hand) is that you can

pull the sheild around with them and also they give you a large head to

attempt to block shots with.
> One thing I've been meaning to try is a pavise: a late-period tower

>shield-- completely impractical for singles combat, but a mini castle when

>toted along. Of course, they'd have to be used en masse, but they'd make the

>Calontir shield wall look like a speed bump...


I would disagree, based on the pavise selection found in the Metropolitan

Museum and also from the various Osprey books. The Calontiri shields are

larger than most pavises except some used as light fortifications; very

clearly it can be seen that the pavis was often strapped on the back, so it

can't be much larger than a scutum.
> Another idea I had was to put a kickstand on the shield, so that it

>would stand up by itself. This way, you could leave it standing in the middle

>of the field or block your rear with it (or put a dummy behind it and sneak

>around in the woods battle, or block a pass through the trees :) ).


Entirely period. You could also put a metal spike on the bottom point, or

put in stakes. There are a number of these used in the West Kingdom, where

missle troops are allowed to carry and place them.

> Plus, you could velcro a buckler or small round to the back...

Where it would fall off after the first hard blow. Just go ahead and strap

it to your forearm.


> Then again, maybe I have to repad my helmet...

I think I have to wash my padding.

> Tristan

>

John Theophilous



From: shick at europa.eng.gtefsd.com (Steve Hick)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Two-pointed Shields: was Spear and Sword

Date: 7 Dec 1993 21:25:54 GMT

Organization: GTE GSC FSD
In article <2e1237INNd08 at matt.ksu.ksu.edu>, harald at matt.ksu.ksu.edu (Harold

Kraus Jr) wrote:


> The good Tristan writes:

>


> [comments on spear and sword deleted]

> > ..... Also, a shield with

> >two sword points on it is documentable for Moorish Spain (the Palladium RPG

> >arms and armor book, which is actually remarkable informative as a tertiary

> >source).

>


> Other posters have noted in the Spear and Sword thread that the above

> piece could be based on a misidentified piece in a Spanish museum (posibly

> a madoo).

>


> The "Book of Fencing: Code de Gotha" by Hans Thalhofer, 1467, Bohemia,

> has an illustration of "Fight with special shield, in the combat called

> 'The Judgement of God'". (Millia Davenport, "The Book of Costume"

>


> The special shield is, basically, a "two-handed 'madoo'".

> Picture a 5'6" ( at 2.6m) spear tipped at each end fixed to the

> back of a 4'x2' shield with rounded of corners. On the vertical axis of

> the shield is a 3' (1m) long shield boss that allows the user to grip

> along that length of the spear shaft. Kind of a squared off Zulu shield.

> Quite silly looking -- at best, I'd say it was a fad, limited

> to the school or region, or a pudgil stick variation.

>


Sorry, I had been reading this, and didn't think of the kampfschild as

germane.


This is true, it is as described, often it has auxiliary points, barbs,

blades, saw-tooth blades, etc.. It is used in judicial duels, and far from

being obscure, it is referenced in most of the major Fechtbucher (German

Fencing Manuals). Besides the 1467 Talhoffer, it appears in (from memory)

the 1443 Talhoffer, Paulus Kal's Fechtbuch of the second half of the 15th C

, Paulus Hector Meier's Fechtbuch of <1542, and several others. It is

used in conjunction with the cudgel, sword(?) and alone.
When used alone, it is used much like a polarm. In conjunction with other

weapons, it seems to be used mostly as a shield. It appears in

documentation from ca 1440 up to the end of the 16th c, not a passing fad.
ST

From: mike at aloysius.equinox.gen.nz (Mike Campbell)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Odd-shaped Turkish shields

Date: Tue, 25 Jan 94 23:20:00 GMT

Organization: Me? Organized?


A few weeks ago someone posted requesting info about an oddly shaped

shield. I don't remember the text (sorry), but I hope the following

helps:
The shield shape was like this:

/|

/ |



__-- |

| |


| |

| |


| |

|_______|


"Renaissance Armies, 1420-1650" (2nd Ed), George Gush, Patrick

Stephens (pubs), 1983, ISBN 0-85059-604-1:


Three similar shields are shown as "typical turkish shields". No date

is given. The three differ only in the shape of the bottom edge - 1

is straight as above, 1 is 1/2 round, and is a little longer overall

than above, the third is peculiar, and I'll try to show it:

| |

\ /


\ |

\ \


\ /

-
,it's supposed to look like the mirror image of a "," (comma), and is

quite smoothly rounded, not like the ASCII!
Hope this helps
Thorfyrd Hakonson, Shire of Southron Gaard, Caid

Mike Campbell, Christchurch, New Zealand

mike at aloysius.equinox.gen.nz

From: pyuaq at csv.warwick.ac.uk (Mr G S Sutherland)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Leather armour questions

Date: 17 Mar 1994 12:34:56 -0000

Organization: University of Warwick, Coventry, UK


cav at bnr.ca (Rick Cavasin) writes:

+u_gearman at mv3800.engr.scarolina.edu writes:


[On topic questions deleted!]
+|> 3) Unrelated question. Can round shields have a boss on them??

+


+ If we're talking early period Viking/Anglo-Saxon, etc., round shields usually

+ had some form of boss. At least that's been my impression.


Early period shields (up until the twelfth century I think) often

had bosses on. A Saxon/Viking/Whatever round shield always would have a

boss since it was a center punch grip. Other shields would sometimes have

a boss affixed, such as many of the kites on the Bayeaux tapestry.


There were also two or variations on the round shield that you may

be interested in.


(1) The oval "poached egg" shield, which was a midway stage between

the kite and the round shield. It was often curved in its cross

section.
(2) The lenticular shield, which was shaped like a watch glass. The

curved cross section helped deflect axe blows.


+|> Thanks in advance for any help that I get and can pass on.

+|>


+|> Rolland Steveneson

+ Cheers, Balderik


Graeme.

From: darrell.markewitz at ambassador.com (Darrell Markewitz)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Shield at Sutton Hoo

Date: Mon, 26 Dec 1994 16:02:24 GMT

Organization: AMBASSADOR BOARD (519) 925-2642 V.32


"The shield...survived only as a jumbled group of metal fittings

associated with tiney scraps of the limewood and leather that once

formed its massive board."
From "the Sutton Hoo Ship Burial" bu Angela Care Evens - 1986
But i don't know enough about the various names proposed (Limewoos,

linwood, basswood) to say if they are the same thing.


Evens goes on to speculate that this shield was a presentation or

cerimonial object (rather than combat) due to the number and fineness of

the ornimental mounts.
It also does not have an iron rim, and the use of soft wood would result

in a short lived shield in actual combat*. The use of lighter wood is

a good choice for a cerimaonial shield.
More 9on this latter!
Darrell/Sylard

From: dnb105 at psu.edu (Ferret)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Shield at Sutton Hoo

Date: Mon, 26 Dec 1994 17:45:01 GMT

Organization: Penn State University


In article <9412261206433947 at ambassador.com> darrell.markewitz at ambassador.com (Darrell Markewitz) writes:
>Evens goes on to speculate that this shield was a presentation or

>cerimonial object (rather than combat) due to the number and fineness of

>the ornimental mounts.
Gold leaf over plaster ornaments would not last long on a battle shield.

It was believed that due to various repairs made to the shield prior to

interment, it was an heirloom and much older than the burial. The ship

itself was estimated to be very old due to the repairs that were evidenced

on it as well, if true it would place the longship as possibly being

condtructed in the 7th or even 6th century. The fact that the ship is

klinker built and had four rigging mounts means that the only difference

between it and 9th and 10th cent. "viking" ships is that the latter had a

much more defined keel and not much else different.
Ferret

From: telkingt at alexandria.lib.utah.edu (Trevor Elkington)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: re: Shield at Sutton Hoo

Date: Tue, 27 Dec 1994 14:49:14 GMT

Organization: Marriott Library, University of Utah


{Clip} Darrell writes about the shield at Sutton Hoo:
Since I believe I may have been the one who started the shield-wood-type

issue in the first place, I just wanted to thank somebody else for

supporting my claim. This is not sour-grapes; my posting program seems to

have a problem with following threads, so after I have written a long and

eloquent defense/discussion of my point, the damn thing won't post. Got

rather fed up and quit posting altogether.


Anyway, I was in London this summer and saw the Sutton Hoo exhibit in first

person. Stunning! And yes, the shield in question was re-constructed

using "limewood" as stated in the little plaque before the piece. I didn't

catch what the actual basis for what wood to use in the model was, but it

does seem that there was some archaeological evidence for this type of wood.
---Thorstein Thorvaldsonnar

---The Viking Librarian

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: re: Shield at Sutton Hoo

From: system at blah.bsu.edu ()

Date: Tue, 27 Dec 94 21:05:30 EST

Organization: Ball State University
At one time I did a fair amount of research into Viking shield construction,

including wood types. I don't have the data in front of me, but yes, limewood

was commonly used. If it is indeed related to what we call basswood here in

the USA, then it was used because it is very tough and resistant to shock.


On the flip-side, I seem to remember oak being used very rarely... it's strong,

but it doesn't take shock very well...and it's _way_ too heavy.


Another thing that I found surprising was the shield thickness... or rather,

a lack thereof. Thickness of 5mm to 7mm was common and were usually tapered

thinner towards the edge.
My conclusions based on my brief research were that lightness counted, and

shields were rebuilt often. Also, you probably could afford to lose a bit of

your shield when you start out with 30" to 40" diameters. Plus, a sword or

axe that gets stuck in your shield can then be wrenched from your opponent's

hands. And lastly, I'm willing to bet that shield wielding techniques were

different than ours in the SCA... we tend to let our indestructable shields

meet the weapons head-on... I'd say that more of a sweeping motion was used

to parry weapons by both shields and weapons.


Gwydion,

the Welsh Viking (sometimes)

See "http://blah.bsuvc.bsu.edu/gwydion" for an explanation...
--

Matt Stum Gwydion ap Myrddin Arglwydd Ball State University

00mjstum at bsuvc.bsu.edu Shire of Afonlyn, MK Muncie, IN USA

Per bend sable and Or, a sun and decrescent counterchanged.

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: re: Sutton Hoo shield...

From: system at blah.bsu.edu ()

Date: Thu, 5 Jan 95 15:14:49 EST

Organization: Ball State University
>While I don't know much about shot distribution (although I *will* ask around,

>I do have a smidgen of information to contribute. Recently I was asked by a

>fighter in our shire to define "Linden Wood", which I had only that week looked

>up for someone here in this group. This sparked a somewhat lengthy discussion

>among the fighters present about the uses of shields versus the weapons they

>defend against. Linden wood is a very LIGHT wood, and I can't imagine that it

>would last for too many battles before being "rent asunder". However, it is

>possible that, like balsa, it could also grip a bladed weapon stuck into it.

>Against an SCA weapon, it would be next to useless though, since SCA weapons,

>no matter what they are protraying, are essentially mass weapons.


I finally dug up my shield research (or part of it, anyway) and here might

be something of interest.


"Linden shields" or "linden boards" or "lindens" were mentioned in Beowulf,

the Finnsburh Fragment, the Battle of Maldon, the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle,

and the Codex Exoniensis. Yet, according to a study of early anglo-saxon

shields here is the distribution of wood types:


type number

----------------- ------

alder 11

willow or poplar 11

maple 3

birch 2


ash 1

oak 1


lime (linden) 1
The theory is that lime may have only been available only in southern

England at the time so it's appearance, or rather lack thereof, in the

rather limited sample might not be so surprising. Also, according to the

chart below, lime, alder, willow and poplar are all similar in terms of

function and characteristics.
type density weight of Toughness (Resistance Resistance to

(lb/cu ft) shield(lbs) to a sudden load) splitting

--------- ---------- ----------- --------------------- -------------

willow 27 5.4 129 390

poplar 27 5.4 90 260

alder 32 6.4 101 330

sycamore 35 7.0 102 420

lime 39 7.8 120 490

birch 41 8.2 198 480

ash 42 8.4 -- 620

oak 43 8.6 131 360
(weight of shield is based on a 0.5m diameter and 7mm thickness)

(sycamore would not have been available, but it's included to simulate maple)


Since most weapons of the time were not mass weapons (sword, axe, spear,

arrow) I would think that resistance to splitting would be more important

to sudden load. I'm not sure why both stats aren't provided for ash, so

without that info it appears lime is a clear winner. Willow and

sycamore/maple are good choices too.
As mass weapons came into play, I would imagine oak and especially birch

might come in handy.


Also keep in mind that 3-ply plywood _did_ exist in some areas. It

provided extra strength and made it easier to make the shields concave.

(The viking shields were predominantly flat, but some of the earlier

anglo-saxon and roman shields were curved.)


Bibliography:
Early Anglo-Saxon Shields

Tania Dickinson, F.S.A. and Heinrick Harke

Volume 110 of Archaeologia

The Society of Antiquaries of London

1992

(This is an EXCELLENT source of detailed information about the construction



and technology of early center-grip shields. While the title implies that

the Vikings might be left out, samples from Sutton Hoo and Gokstad are

included.)
--

Matt Stum Gwydion ap Myrddin Arglwydd Ball State University

00mjstum at bsuvc.bsu.edu Shire of Afonlyn, MK Muncie, IN USA

Per bend sable and Or, a sun and decrescent counterchanged.

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

From: gaummb at fnma.COM (Mario Butler)

Subject: Re: kite shields

Organization: Fannie Mae

Date: Mon, 9 Jan 1995 13:51:57 GMT
In article 2F0DEAC7 at courier.sscnet.ucla.edu, Valdez at polisci.sscnet.ucla.EDU (Valdez, Jonathan POLI SCI) writes:

>Diarmuit Ui Dhunn recently discussed his research on bolt patterns on kite

>shields and how to strap them. I wanted to suggest one possibility, but

>annoyingly, can't remember where I saw the illustration (although I think it

>was from a period source; perhaps the Bayeaux?). In any case, I remember

>seeing a kite shield strapped so that the shield arm was held perpendicular

>to the ground; it struck me that this might be a useful way to hold such a

>shield. I don't know whether that would help explain bolt patterns, however.


This is the way I had the straps on my kite. Loved the ease in which I could block

swings. My next shield is gonna be like this, too.


Mario

From: LIB_IMC at vax1.utulsa.edu (I. Marc Carlson)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Shield Construction (was Re: Sutton Hoo...)

Date: 9 Jan 1995 10:08:02 -0600

Organization: UTexas Mail-to-News Gateway


I received an interesting set of questions, by private mail, to my comments on

the shield I built, and since they were indicative of something missing from my

earlier post, I decided to forward them and answer them here, in case anyone

else was interested.


Stefan li Rous
>>Personally, I just finished building a Norman style kite, built from oak planks,

>>faced in leather and reinforced with rawhide...

>How much did it wiegh!!! How thick were the oak planks? What are "the very

>things that would make it useful versus real weapons" that "are likely to

>act against it in SCA combat"?
We haven't actually weighed the silly thing, but I'd estimate that it's about

15-20 pounds. The Planks are 3/4" and the whole thing is faced in 8 oz cow-

hide.
Primarily the "things" I was referring to with regard to "real" combat are its

structural flexibility and its thickness/weight. If the shield were to be used

against arrows, as well as real swords, axes, etc. (which are, relatively

speaking, rather light compared to their SCA counterparts) it would be much more

effective than if it were to be continually hammered on with a club (which is,

in essence what a stick of rattan is).


A temporarily displaced scholar,
Diarmuit Ui Dhunn

University of Northkeep, Northkeepshire

(I. Marc Carlson

IMC at VAX2.UTULSA.EDU

LIB_IMC at VAX1.UTULSA.EDU)

From: LIB_IMC at vax1.utulsa.edu (I. Marc Carlson)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: re: Kite Shields

Date: 9 Jan 1995 10:31:41 -0600

Organization: UTexas Mail-to-News Gateway


Iban de Sepulveda (Valdez, Jonathan POLI SCI)>

>Diarmuit Ui Dhunn recently discussed his research on bolt patterns on kite

>shields and how to strap them. I wanted to suggest one possibility, but

>annoyingly, can't remember where I saw the illustration (although I think it

>was from a period source; perhaps the Bayeaux?). In any case, I remember

>seeing a kite shield strapped so that the shield arm was held perpendicular

>to the ground; it struck me that this might be a useful way to hold such a

>shield. I don't know whether that would help explain bolt patterns, however.
That sounds about right. The pattern I eventually went with was
********** Guige attached to top two rivets

**..........** Buckled Cross Strapping for a grip

*..o.........o.* Two lower, buckled straps to hold forearm.

*................*

*....o.........o...*

*.....\.xxxx../....*

*.......\**/.......*

*.......x/\x.......*

*...../xxxx\.....*

*...o/.......\o..*

*..............*

*..o---------o.*

*............*

*............*

*o--------o*

*..........*

*........*

*........*

*......*

*......*


*....*

*....*


*..*

*..*


**

**
This shield pattern was used by a Mounted Norman in the scene numbered XX

in my copy of _Mysteries of the Bayeaux Tapestry_
If anyone wants the listing of the 25 patterns used on the tapestry, please

let me know. It's a bit long to send here to the Rialto, or so my wife who

reads the digest tells me :)

A temporarily displaced scholar,


Diarmuit Ui Dhunn

University of Northkeep, Northkeepshire

(I. Marc Carlson

IMC at VAX2.UTULSA.EDU

LIB_IMC at VAX1.UTULSA.EDU)

From: Garick Chamberlin

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: HELP!! Helm/Shield Making Needed

Date: Wed, 13 Sep 95 23:52:47 GMT

Organization: Drachenwald


In response to the question on shield making, here is an answer I gave to

another person in similar straights some time ago. I hope it helps.


I make all my shields, as well as many for new fighters, out of old

street signs. I know this sounds dumb, but it is just about the perfect

shield material. One standard size street sign and a handfull of rivets

will make the perfect tourney sheild in just a couple of hours. It will

be light, about 7-8 pounds. It will be strong, my 6 year old shield is

still in use. It will be attractive, as long as you remember to put the

sign side IN and cover it. It will be cheap, read free.
First off, DON'T STEAL AN IN USE STREET SIGN. Call your local road

maintainance department, or moral equivelant, and ask for an old one.

If you mention that you want it to build equipment for a nonprofit,

educational group they will most likely say "Sure. Come on down. How many

do you want?" If they don't, don't be daunted. Simply call the county

roads department, or a neighboring city's. So far, I've never had to call'

more than one department in my search. They have no use for them and are

glad to give them to a good cause.


Once you have your street sign, mark the shape and size of shield you

desire onto the metal. Then cut it out. Remember that if you are making

a curved shield the curve will reduce its width by about 2 inches, so cut it

out 2 inches wider than you want your finished shield to be.


If you are going to curve it, now is the time. Street signs are made from a

titaniumaluminum alloy and are therefore very springy. Though this

drastically reduces their tendancy to dent, it also makes curving them

fiendishly difficult. After much experimentation I have found that the best

method for putting in a curve which will stay without over weakening the

metal is to find, or make, two boards which are parralel and about 1/4 to

1/2 of an inch apart and insert the shield blank a couple of inches, bend,

insert it a couple of more inches, bend, etc. Bend the shield a little more

than you want it to remain, as the metal's natural elastiscity will eleminate

part of the curve after a couple of weeks use. Methods that DON'T work

include putting it on a log and jumping up and down on the edges

of both sides and putting it half over the curb and driving over

it. The first doesn't stress the metal enough to give it any permenant

curve, no matter how hard you try. The second overstresses the metal and

makes it very susceptible to denting and bending in ways that you don't want.
Now take the leftover pieces of sign and make reinforcements out of them.

It is vital to the life of your shield that you reinforce the most frequently

hit part, i.e. the part near your hand. For a round shield, make a large "D"

shape and rivet it to the inside, leading edge of your shield. For a heater,

or "bunny-round" (a round bottom, with a heater top) you need to make a sort

of "L" shape on its side, with the tail part on the hand side of the shield.

Something like this _______

)) this is hard to visualize in ASCI, sorry. This

piece should be about 6 inches wide on the "stem" and about 12 from the top

to the end of the tail and 6 inches in from the side. The "bend" of the L

should be gently curved on the inside (i.e. lower side) to give an arch type

of support, rather than a weak corner. It should come down far enough that

the handle is put over it, so that the handle won't have an anvil effect

with the shield bending around it. For heaters you should also add a small

(maybe 6 inch tall by 4 inch wide) diamond shape to the bottom, so that the

bottom won't curve up like a ski tip.


To hang (i.e. put on the handle and strap) a heater shield, pick up the upper

right corner with your thumb and forefinger. Hold it out and draw a straight

line on the inside of the shield exactly perpendicular to the ground. This

is the line your arm should be on when holding the shield. Now stand

with your arm in whatever is, for you, a natural spot to hold the shield.

Have a friend hold the shield with the line against your arm. Have him/her

move the sheild up and down untill your natural holding position matches a

good spot for the shield. You should just barely be able to see over the

edge of the shield and an opponent should not be able to see your whole nose.

Mark the spot where your hand is and put the handle there.


I always use 5 1/2 or 6 inch door pulls for handles. They fit the hand very

well, but must be raised about 1/2 an inch to avoid squishing your hand.

A pile of washers, a thin spacer of wood, or what have you will easily

accomplish this. Put some sort of cage over the handle to avoid having your

hand caught between the hammer of your shield being propelled by a blow and

the anvil of your helm. Many armorers make shieldbaskets, or you can

make/ adapt one yourself. I have seen people use old bread loaf pan cut

in half, but can not vouch for their efficacy. If they are available in

your area, the grilled faceshields from hockey and lacrosse helmets work

excellently.


Put a layer of close celled foam, or some such, along the line were your arm

will go, including under the handle. This will significanly reduce shock

transmission from their shield to you. Put a strap over your forearm about

2/3 of the way from your wrist to your elbow. DO NOT put the strap low

enough on your arm as to touch your elbow's tendons. This will rob you

of strength and energy faster than you would believe possible. I

prefer a very tight strap, so that my shield mirrors my tiniest move without

delay. The wider your strap is, the less it bites and, therefore, the less

tiring it is to hold your shield. Soft leather is best for this.
All you need do now is to drill holes along the edges,about 1 1/2 inches in,

every 3 inches or so. Make the holes closer together near the corners. As

the top right (for right-handers) corner takes the most abuse, glue a short

section of leather or bike tire over that corner before adding the rest of the

rimming. A soft "rubber cement" type glue works best for this. Now take an

old bicycle tire (27 inch ten speed tires work best, for the average heater)

and cut the wires out of it. Without wires it should stretch over the rim of

your shield quite well. Hold it in place by spiraling wire, string, 550 cord,

or what have you through the holes you drilled earlier and tie it off. You

can get old bike tires from bike shops just for the asking. Take all they

give you, as they through them away in batches, so sometimes they don't have

any and you have to drive all over town looking for one. In desparate

situations, you can even buy one.
Lastly, or sometimes even before rimming, decorate your shield. If painting

armory upon it, be aware that the aluminum tends to shed paint unless you put

a coat of primer on it. After priming, it takes paint fine. The already

painted side, however, doesn't take paint for beans even if primered first.

Therefore,the sign side should ALWAYS go on the inside and to cover it up I

reccomend glueing a piece of scrap fabric over it. Again, a nonbrittle,

rubber cement type glue works best for this.

You will now have a shield that will last for years. Enjoy it and use it in

good health.
Yours in Service,

Viscount Sir Garick von Kopke


Permission is hearby granted to crosspost this article to other forums and to

publish it in any notforprofit periodical.


... Honor Virtus Est

From: rshipp at flash.net (Randy Shipp)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Shield Help???

Date: Tue, 04 Jun 1996 16:44:38 GMT

Organization: University of North Texas


HDXQ27A at prodigy.com (Terry Aucoin) wrote:
> I'm about to builda Tear Drop shield but lack one vital information on

>the bending of the wood. How do you slightly curve the wood? A friend

>told me you have to wet it, bent for set, and let dry into set!
>is this the correct way?
This was recently discussed, and based on the discussion, I went home

and built my first curved plywood heater shield blank. Cost was

probably about $15 or so dollars, not counting tools.
First, I bought a 4x8 sheet of 1/4" B/C plywood, which is sanded and

nicer on one side than the other. I had the lumberyard cut it in

half, so I had two 4'x4' pieces.
I took one piece, and measured and drew a centerline down the middle

of the nice side (It'll be the inside of the shield). I then measured

13" from the centerline on each side to show the width of my heater.

I measured down 36" from the top and drew across, so I had a 26"x36"

box. Then I just sketched in the heater shape in pencil. Now I was

ready to laminate.


I put two sawhorses fairly close together and put the second piece of

plywood, nice side down on them. The plywood will naturally flex one

way more easily than another. Align that natural bend so that the

plywood will curve down into the gap between the sawhorses. Then

slather wood glue generously on the bottom piece of plywood. I had my

girlfriend help, and we used pieces of cardboard as scrapers to spread

the glue around. We used maybe a pint of glue...maybe less.
Put the plywood with your shield drawn on it on top. Square up the

edges and put many C-clamps tightly around the edges of the plywood.

Then take two pipe clamps and put them across the shield. Tighten

them evenly, and they will curve the blank. Put just a little more

curve than you want, as it will rebound slightly when you release the

clamps.


Leave clamped for 24 hours and then cut out your blank with a jigsaw.
AFTERWORD: After making my blank, I decided on a few changes. First,

I think I will cut off all but a few inches on either side of the

shield drawing before I laminate it. Thus, I'll be curving a 30"x48"

stack of wood instead of a 48"x48" blank. I didn't get quite as tight

a curve on my blank as I would have liked (I won't know for sure until

I use the shield), and I think a narrower lamination would've allowed

me to put more curve in it. Your mileage may vary.
I hope this helps. I saw lots of different ways mentioned, but I

think pipe clamps offered the most stable, controllable method of

putting the bend in the shield.
In Service,
Antoine D'Aubernoun

mka Randy Shipp

rshipp at flash.net

From: claude at nickel.laurentian.ca

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Shield Help???

Date: 4 Jun 96 11:12:50 -0500

Organization: Laurentian University


I built my very first shield last year and here is a brief description

of how I made it.


I first built a mould or form out of 3/4" plywoob that had the curvevature

of the shield I wanted to create. On it I layed three layers, one at a time,

of 3/16" plywood gluying them together with contact cement. Clamps of all sorts

were used for this. After a few hours of drying I removed the glued shield from

the form and cut it to size and sanded it. I then stained and varnished it. For

a more "classic" look I added steel edgings and a steel heraldic cross using

pop rivets. I then spray varnished the entired item.
The shield did straighten out just a little bit when it was removed from the

mold but nothing too be concerned about. If you are satisfied with your results

you can use the same mold to construct as many shields as you like.
Hope this helps.

Claude.


From: Christopher Miller

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Shield Material

Date: Sun, 06 Apr 1997 11:02:46 -0500


ltemplar wrote:

> Down here in Austin, Texas I went to Sam's Club Warehouse and noticed

> a large circular turn table made out of OAK. It is about a half inch

> thick and either 24" or 30" wide. It sells for $19.95. I figured you

> can just take off the ball bearing contrapion on the back and make a

> pretty neat looking shield. It is also beveled around the edge. What

> does anyone think?
For a "round shield and mass weapon" tourney, I made a round out of a

flexible flyer sled. Seriously, I was walking through Toys-R-Us, and

they had a stack of the saucers for sale. 25 7/16" inches across, 16

gauge steel, dished, edges rolled, $16. A 26" bicycle tire finished it

off quite nicely.
Break the paradigms. Try it and let me know how it works.
Madoc

From: bwc at proaxis.com (Doug Brunner)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Shield Material

Date: 6 Apr 1997 16:15:52 GMT

Organization: Brunner's Woods and Crafts


rhogan at mnsi.net wrote:

>This may be passing simple, but why not just buy two of these wonderously

>cheap shield rounds, and put the beveled edges out, and stick them

>together, grains at perpendicular? That way you get a solid inch, and

>have a good reason to rim it with some iron for strength.
I'd have to agree with this one. I'm not a fighter, first of all. I've

gotten old enough that I truly appreciate the fact that the bruises take much

longer to heal at my age.;-) But, I do sling a lot of wood. For me to rip

through a couple hundred board feet in a day is not unusual. After about 2 or

3 hours, this gets a bit heavy. Even if I do wimp out and put it down a lot.

Bottom line, inch thick oak is HEAVY. It's not that bad for the first few

minutes. But, after three or four rounds you're going to be tired. I would

just guess that one inch oak, with the iron rim, straps and steel guard, would

weigh near to 19 pounds.
IF you lift small cars for exercise, that would be no problem.

However, the people I've worked with prefer something a bit lighter. I was

making mine out of multiple layers of 1/8" paneling and 1/4" Plywood. I was

making curved shields. I had made a frame of 2X6's. This frame allowed a

curve/drop of 3.5in from the center to the edge. The frame was 26" across. I

bent a piece of 1/4 Maple three ply across the frame and attached it. I

cleaned the surface of the ply and the paneling and glued a layer of 1/8"

paneling across it. I then drilled holes of 5/16" in predetermined spots for

my flanges. I use a from of nut, with a flange. They're often used in

furniture. I would then use a Forstner Bit and form an offset in the paneling.

This allowed the flange to sit below the edge of the paneling. After all that,

I laid on the another layer of 1/4" Maple Plywood. This allowed me to have a

finished front, with no bolts coming through. I had already made the knuckle

guards. This just bolted into position. The other spots were put in to allow

the user to move the basket and straps around as they saw fit. This was all

assembled with TiteBond II glue.


The edging was done in heavy Rawhide. I put it on wet, so it would

tighten as it dried. Some people prefer splitting a heavy garden hose. I

wanted a more authentic look and feel. The rawhide was held on with Brass

Rivets. I almost forgot. After the three layers were dry, I put 1/4" wooden

dowels through the shield to form a pattern. Usually just 4"X4" squares. It

looked nice and gave the shield much greater strength. The paneling, ply and

glue was much harder to delaminate like this. Knuckle guards were made of 1/4"

round stock steel, primed and painted. The front was waxed and buffed to a

nice glossy finish.
Final product weighed about 12lbs. It was a lot of work, but my

customers seemed to appreciate it. I've never had one come back.


Lord, I sound like a commercial. Too bad I've closed my shop and

business. ;)


Doug B.

From: bwc at proaxis.com (Doug Brunner)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Help with my shield?

Date: 5 Apr 1997 17:00:14 GMT

Organization: Brunner's Woods and Crafts


mdavies at sprynet.com says...

>I'm a newbie trying to put together a shield, and need help with the

>dimensions for a decent heater.
I used to custom make shields. Most people I did work for used a basic

formula for a beginner's shield. The width of the shield should be

approximatley the width of your shoulders. The height is from your chin to

your crotch. Start the curve at approximatley 40% from the top and run it down

to a point about 2 fingers wide. To set your grips, lay the shield on your

arm, above your head. Put the shield and your arm in such a way that the

shield balances with your arm about midway between top and bottom. Mark the

distance between your knuckles and elbow. Find the center of these marks.

Rotate your arm to about 20deg, depending on right or left handed. This should

be about where your arm should be when you support the shield. Each person is

a bit different. This includes muscularature(spelling*?). Experiment in the

location of your arm and elbow. This, I've found, is probably the most

critical point. This is what defines your balance and how the shield wears. I

used to keep a dummy/protype in the shop. It was quite adjustable, with

several dozen holes in it for locating straps and guards. I used this to fine

tune the pieces.


Hope I haven't confused things too much.;-)
Doug B.

From: Christopher Miller

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Help with my shield?

Date: Sun, 06 Apr 1997 10:45:24 -0500
Mike Davies wrote:

> I'm a newbie trying to put together a shield, and need help with the

> dimensions for a decent heater. I already have a sheet of 2' x 4' exterior

> grade plywood. I also have hose for the outside edge, a handle, and a belt

> for the arm. What I really need help with is measurements for overall

> length, and how far down from the top should I go before I start to curve

> the bottom to a point? Also, how far down from the top should the handle

> be? If height needs to be taken into account, I'm 5'10". Thanx for the

> help.

> --


> Madok ap Davyd

> Madrone, An-tir

> mdavies at sprynet.com
With a name like Madok, you got something going for ya.
My personal preference is to cut the plywood to 24" across by 34" long

prior to curving the wood. Then one of two construction types: (1) two

sheets of equal sized 1/4" plywood, glued together and pressed or (2)

three sheets of equal sized 1/4" plywood, two of which have the center

cut out (to lighten the weight slightly while maintaining rim-strength

and balance), glued together and pressed.


Leave the wood in the rectangular shape. Use a LOT of carpenters glue to

glue the two together. While the glue is still wet, put the blanks into

a shield press and crank it down, with slightly more of a bend than you

want in the finished shield. If you do not have access to a shield

press, place the blanks on top of a couple of railroad ties set two feet

apart, and put scrap metal, sand bags, or any other kind of Massive,

localized weight along the centerline (enough weight to make the plywood

touch the floor between the RR ties). After about three days, remove the

blank form the press, and trace you heater shape onto it. My personal

preference is straight edges to about halfway dow the sides, than a

gradual curving taper to the point of the shield. I trim the sides only

enough to even up the edges of the plywood (usually trimming it to 22 or

23 inches across) and between 32 and 34 inches from the top edge to the

point.
Madoc Arundel

(marundel at ponyexpress.net)

Or, an Acorn within Oak Leaves in annulo vert.

From: Blues

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Help with my shield?

Date: Tue, 08 Apr 1997 17:40:35 -0400


Mike Davies wrote:

> I'm a newbie trying to put together a shield, and need help with the

> dimensions for a decent heater. I already have a sheet of 2' x 4' exterior

> grade plywood. I also have hose for the outside edge, a handle, and a belt

> for the arm. What I really need help with is measurements for overall

> length, and how far down from the top should I go before I start to curve

> the bottom to a point? Also, how far down from the top should the handle

> be? If height needs to be taken into account, I'm 5'10". Thanx for the

> help.

> --


> Madok ap Davyd

> Madrone, An-tir

> mdavies at sprynet.com
I wrote an article some years back about making heater shields. It has a

reduced pattern with the measurements you need given. It's now on my Web

site with some other articles of interest to new fighters at:
http://ic.net/~blues/fight.htm
Other articles of interest to people new to the SCA in general are at:
http://ic.net/~blues/articles.htm
Gunnbjorn Gunnarsson

--


The Blues Viking Online!

http://ic.net/~blues

From: Dani Eder

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Aluminum SAhield Blanks

Date: Thu, 08 May 1997 19:28:04 -0500

Organization: Castle Guild, Society for Creative Anachronism
James Morrow wrote:

> I need one for a friend. Where can i get one Please?

>

> Achbar
We need a little more information in order to answer the question.



Used road signs (which can often be found in metal scrap yards) can

be converted into an aluminum shield blank if one has a jig saw to

cut out the shape, or can find a local SCA armorer with a "Beverly

Shears". If you want to put a curve on the shield, it can be bent

around a tree trunk. Road sign aluminum is fairly soft, so it is

easy to work, but it is also easy to dent.


At the other extreme, you can get an sheet of aircraft aluminum

alloy, which is much stiffer. Therefore it is harder to work, but

will stand up to blows longer. The last set of shield blanks I

made were from 6061-T6, 0.100 inches thick. To put a curve on

it I placed two 4" diameter poles lengthwise on the ground spaced

almost the width of the shield. On top of this I placed the shield

blank. On top of this I placed a sawmill slab from the outside of

a tree, curved side down. Then I drove a Chevy full-size conversion

van carefully over the sawmill slab until the shield blank was

bent somewhat more than the final curve I wanted (it springs back

some).
A more expensive alternative is to take the shield blank to a

sheet metal shop and have them put a curve on it for you using

their large forming rollers. At the extreme, take a drawing of

the shield you want to a sheet metal shop and have them make it

for you from scratch.
If you live in or near a large city, or can get to a larger event,

there should be an SCA armorer who can make one for you - ask

around locally, or go to the merchant area of the large event,

or go up to someone with an aluminum shield and ask them where

they got it.
Which of the above methods you choose depends on things like

how soon you need it and how much you want to spend on it.


Daniel of Raven's Nest

[Submitted by: rmhowe ]

Subject: re: Plastic, and other (fwd)

Date: Wed, 18 Nov 1998 16:32:26 -0500 (EST)

From: David KUIJT

To: Craig Levin

CC: Merry Rose
On Wed, 18 Nov 1998, Craig Levin wrote:

> It wouldn't be that hard to develop shields that broke apart in

> that way. Supposedly, in the sixteenth century, there were such

> shields developed for tournaments in the Holy Roman Empire (see

> Clepham's The Medieval Tournament, from Dover Press). In so

> doing, you would only be recreating a part of period tournament

> practice.
I'm afraid I disagree. The exploding shields used in German tournaments

in the 16th century were fancy spring-loaded jousting targets. They had

nothing to do with foot combat, and very little to do with jousting in the

combat sense.


Jonathan was talking (semi-facetiously) about shields designed to degrade

when hit as a simulation of the behaviour of a medieval shield made of

wood/leather/gesso/etc being hit by a real sword, axe, or halberd.
The 16th century "shattering" shields were essentially a bunch of metal

segments bound together in a mouse-trap type spring-loaded framework

simulating the face of a jousting shield. If you hit the exact center

with your lance in a joust, the spring triggered and the shield face blew

apart in forty pieces as if you had shattered it. This was the

Renaissance equivalent of bells and whistles, the outgrowth of a scoring

system for jousting that had long since lost all connection to combat.
There are a number of books with diagrams of the exploding shields; I

believe that the most easy-to-find illustrations are by Du"rer.


Dafydd

[Submitted by: rmhowe ]

Subject: re: Plastic, and other (fwd)

Date: Wed, 18 Nov 1998 15:40:16 -0600 (CST)

From: clevin at ripco.com (Craig Levin)

To: atlantia at atlantia.sca.org (Merry Rose)


Earl Dafydd:

> On Wed, 18 Nov 1998, Craig Levin wrote:

> > It wouldn't be that hard to develop shields that broke apart in

> > that way. Supposedly, in the sixteenth century, there were such

> > shields developed for tournaments in the Holy Roman Empire (see

> > Clepham's The Medieval Tournament, from Dover Press). In so

> > doing, you would only be recreating a part of period tournament

> > practice.

>

> I'm afraid I disagree. The exploding shields used in German tournaments



> in the 16th century were fancy spring-loaded jousting targets. They had

> nothing to do with foot combat, and very little to do with jousting in the

> combat sense.
Darn. I was hoping that they'd be something a bit more realistic.
> Jonathan was talking (semi-facetiously) about shields designed to degrade

> when hit as a simulation of the behaviour of a medieval shield made of

> wood/leather/gesso/etc being hit by a real sword, axe, or halberd.

>

> The 16th century "shattering" shields were essentially a bunch of metal



> segments bound together in a mouse-trap type spring-loaded framework

> simulating the face of a jousting shield. If you hit the exact center

> with your lance in a joust, the spring triggered and the shield face blew

> apart in forty pieces as if you had shattered it. This was the

> Renaissance equivalent of bells and whistles, the outgrowth of a scoring

> system for jousting that had long since lost all connection to combat.


Well, that's true, but if these individuals are looking for

possible avenues to go for shields that "break" when hit,

wouldn't it make sense to see how others have tried to do the

same thing? Surely, with the improvements in mechanical and

materials engineering, it might be possible to go from this

intricate mousetrap to a shield made of a mosaic of parts held

together by a brittle glue that breaks?
> There are a number of books with diagrams of the exploding shields; I

> believe that the most easy-to-find illustrations are by Du"rer.


I'll look for them. Thank you!
Pedro de Alcazar

[Submitted by: rmhowe ]

Subject: re: Plastic, and other (fwd)

Date: Wed, 18 Nov 1998 17:00:37 -0500 (EST)

From: David KUIJT

To: Craig Levin

CC: Merry Rose
On Wed, 18 Nov 1998, Craig Levin wrote:

> > The 16th century "shattering" shields were essentially a bunch of metal

> > segments bound together in a mouse-trap type spring-loaded framework

> > simulating the face of a jousting shield. If you hit the exact center

> > with your lance in a joust, the spring triggered and the shield face blew

> > apart in forty pieces as if you had shattered it. This was the

> > Renaissance equivalent of bells and whistles, the outgrowth of a scoring

> > system for jousting that had long since lost all connection to combat.

>

> Well, that's true, but if these individuals are looking for



> possible avenues to go for shields that "break" when hit,

> wouldn't it make sense to see how others have tried to do the

> same thing? Surely, with the improvements in mechanical and

> materials engineering, it might be possible to go from this

> intricate mousetrap to a shield made of a mosaic of parts held

> together by a brittle glue that breaks?


Hmm. I'm guessing that you haven't seen the illustrations of the

mechanism?


It certainly might be possible to make a shield that will break apart as

you describe -- hell, I could probably do it in my basement, by cutting

plywood 2" hexagons and gluing them together. Might be fun, if I ever

get any free time. It is an amusing idea, certainly. Might be simpler to

just make a shield from a relatively fragile material (blue sheet

insulation, for example).


However, this would have no connection at all with the "exploding" shield

design -- from memory, those designs have more in common with truck

leaf-springs and car-door hinges than a glued mosaic of parts. They

weren't designed to be ablative (destroyed gradually), either; if hit

correctly they were designed to shatter dramatically and completely.
> > There are a number of books with diagrams of the exploding shields; I

> > believe that the most easy-to-find illustrations are by Du"rer.

>

> I'll look for them. Thank you!



>

> Pedro de Alcazar


If I recall correctly, the sequence was as part of one of his triumphal

processionals. Three or four different types were illustrated, each on a

separate page, with a dozen men on horses in appropriate costume on each

page. Different German jousting games used different armour requirements,

so everyone on one page would be outfitted for the Rennzeug, for example,

and on the next page for something else, all as if they were processing

through a town as part of a festival.
I'm pretty sure it was Du"rer. I'll try to get a citation for you

tomorrow. You can also find illustrations in Barber and Barkers book

"Tournaments", I believe.
Dafydd

[Submitted by: rmhowe ]

Subject: re: Plastic, and other (fwd)

Date: Wed, 18 Nov 1998 17:09:53 -0500 (EST)

From: Michael Surbrook

CC: Merry Rose


On Wed, 18 Nov 1998, David KUIJT wrote:

> > Well, that's true, but if these individuals are looking for

> > possible avenues to go for shields that "break" when hit,

> > wouldn't it make sense to see how others have tried to do the

> > same thing? Surely, with the improvements in mechanical and

> > materials engineering, it might be possible to go from this

> > intricate mousetrap to a shield made of a mosaic of parts held

> > together by a brittle glue that breaks?

>

> Hmm. I'm guessing that you haven't seen the illustrations of the



> mechanism?

>

> It certainly might be possible to make a shield that will break apart as



> you describe -- hell, I could probably do it in my basement, by cutting

> plywood 2" hexagons and gluing them together. Might be fun, if I ever

> get any free time. It is an amusing idea, certainly. Might be simpler to

> just make a shield from a relatively fragile material (blue sheet

> insulation, for example).

>

> However, this would have no connection at all with the "exploding" shield



> design -- from memory, those designs have more in common with truck

> leaf-springs and car-door hinges than a glued mosaic of parts. They

> weren't designed to be ablative (destroyed gradually), either; if hit

> correctly they were designed to shatter dramatically and completely.


The shields were round and had a trigger in the center boss. Is struck

squarely, two arms snapped out from either side of the boss, causing the

sections of shield to fly free.
The best pay to picture the shields (as I have seen them drawn) is to

imagine a large pizza with about 16-20 slices. Each slice is designed to

fly free. Underneath the pizza are two arms, shaped roughly like an

infinity sign (except the center arm is longer). In ASCII it looks a

little like this: o-o. Hit the center bar, release the spring and the

arms snap foward and pop the snmall pizza slices off of the framework.


I am not certain what held the sections of shield in place, however, as

the artwor didn't make that too clear.


Michael Limner, esq.

[Submitted by: rmhowe ]

Subject: Re: Curved plywood for shields.

Date: Thu, 19 Nov 1998 15:58:31 -0500 (EST)

From: David KUIJT

To: Steve Schell

CC: Merry Rose Tavern at Cheapside
On Thu, 19 Nov 1998, Steve Schell wrote:

> Now for the construction! I'm sure I can find flat plywood but as some

> have suggested, curved shields balance better.

> Anyone have a notion of where to purchase curved plywood or how to get

> flat plywood to conform to such a shape?
Take two layers of 3/8" plywood. Slap a wad of good wood-glue on one side

of one layer (spread it around with a cheap paintbrush so it covers the

whole side). Slap the two pieces together. Bend the result over a curved

form and clamp it down. Let the glue dry. When completely dry (24 hours

for most wood glue) take it out of the form and cut it to shape.
The curved form is the hard part, but you can often borrow that from some

other fighter in your area. Ask around. Another technique involves rigid

straps, a couple of two-by-fours, and a car jack, but that is hard to

describe in text.


Dafydd

[Submitted by: rmhowe ]

Subject: Re: Curved plywood for shields.

Date: Thu, 19 Nov 1998 18:05:22 EST

From: GUNDSPHOTO at aol.com

To: Armond66 at aol.com, atlantia at atlantia.sca.org


>TBone's squire Armand has welded a reallt sweet press, but it is in the

>thriving metropolis of Beloit, WI. Perhaps Sir Thorbrandr can talk his

>squire into giving us the plans. Hmmmmm?>
I would be happy to share my plans, but they contains no novels, ( but I did

read them while in service) the only tree is on my device, and a car jack???

Humm its close, but I use * inch angle iron, 1inch threaded rod, 5 oak 2 x 12

and a house jack. The Bad news is that it is NOT portable at all. The good

news is I can press 3 shield at once. ( insert Tim Allen Grunt here). I am

hoping to make another van full this winter and drive out to T-bone's this

spring were I will be happy to sell and or trade for them. Anyone wishing

for the plans for my press e-mail me and I will be happy to draw them up for

you.
Armond

Living in North Shield but an Atlantian at heart.

[Submitted by: rmhowe ]

Subject: Exploding shields

Date: Fri, 20 Nov 1998 09:29:15 -0500 (EST)

From: David KUIJT

CC: Merry Rose
> However, this would have no connection at all with the "exploding" shield

> design -- from memory, those designs have more in common with truck

> leaf-springs and car-door hinges than a glued mosaic of parts. They

> weren't designed to be ablative (destroyed gradually), either; if hit

> correctly they were designed to shatter dramatically and completely.
> There are a number of books with diagrams of the exploding shields; I

> believe that the most easy-to-find illustrations are by Du"rer.


I was close, but not perfect -- the woodcuts are not Du:rer, as it turns

out, but his contemporary, Hans Burgkmair.


At least two different shields of this spring-loaded exploding type are

illustrated in _The_Triumph_of_Maximilian_I_, 1526, a long series of

woodcuts by Hans Burgkmair and Albrecht Altdorfer (and possibly others).
One such illustration is in "A History of British Wood Engraving" by

Albert Garrett (London: Midas Books, 1978) ISBN 0 859360776, page 57.


There are good pictures of the surviving trigger mechanism in "Arms and

Armour of the Medieval Knight" (don't have a citation with me), and in the

Osprey Elite series 17, "Knights at Tournament" Christopher Gravett, page

29. The Osprey also has an illustration from The Triumph of Maximilian I

on page 49 showing another type of exploding shield, different from the

one shown by Garrett in "A History of British Wood Engraving".


Dafydd

[Submitted by: rmhowe ]

Subject: Re: T1000 shields?

Date: Mon, 23 Nov 1998 13:09:53 EST

From: JBRMM266 at aol.com

To: atlantia at atlantia.sca.org


On the subject of super-light shields . . . while lightness is an advantage

to a point, if a shield is TOO light, it can paradoxically be tiring or even

dangerous.
Why? Because if a shield has not enough inertia to deaden the force of a

blow, the the user has to take a lot of that force with this strength of his

arm, almost as if he were blocking it with his (armored) arm alone.
Blows from certain angles could simply spin the shield out of the way and

come right in.


Blows from certain other angles could impart a twisting action to the arm

which could result in discomfort or injury.


Have a care of making gear too light ... there is a trade off!
At different times, there were minimum weight-to-size ratios for shields,

which were partly for authenticity and partly, I believe, for safety.

Perhaps these should be re-introduced . ...
~Donal Mac Ruiseart.

Subject: Re: ANST - shield covers

Date: Wed, 17 Mar 99 09:30:23 MST

From: "Dennis Grace"

To: ansteorra at Ansteorra.ORG
Salut Cozyns,
Lord Stefan of Florilegium fame quotes--

>> As to colorful shield covers, Come see mine some time, cozyn. I glue a

>> sturdy twill to the face and then paint my arms upon it (or, I should

>> say, my lady paints my arms upon it) before strapping the safety tubing

>> to the edge. I've seen others do the same glued-on treatment so that

>> the cloth actually covered the edge.


and queries:

>I thought at first that the advantage of the cloth covers was that

>they could be replaced when they got battered or transferred to another

>shield if the underlying shield got pulverized. But in the process that

>Sir Lyonel describes the cover is glued to the underlying shield.

>

>So what is the advantage of the cloth covers? Are they easier to paint



>than the underlying alluminum or plywood? Or do you just think they

>look better?


I've found the painted cloth treatment to have a number of advantages:
(1) The cloth will accept a wider range of paints than the aluminum.
(2) The paint doesn't flake off of the cloth the way it does from

aluminum (and from plywood, to a lesser degree).


(3) Though glued on, the cloth is easily removed and replaced once it

becomes tattered. The cloth just peels off. If you have to repaint an

aluminum or wooden shield, you usually have to sand it to avoid a lumpy

look.
Sir Lyonel Oliver Grace

Subject: Re: ANST - shield covers

Date: Wed, 17 Mar 99 11:56:30 MST

From: "Dennis Grace"

To: ansteorra at Ansteorra.ORG


Stefan inquires:

>1) Do you have a particular glue recommendation? A wood glue? Something

>more waterproof? I guess I'm thinking of the recent Gulf Wars and a few

>other events. There often is not space in the tent to store a shield.


You'll have to ask one of the fighters who uses a wooden shield what

glue s/he prefers. I use spray-on adhesive. Since the edges are held

down securely by the edging, the glue just keeps the cloth against the

face.
>2) You said in your first message that you glued the cloth to the shield

>and then painted it. Have you ever tried painting first and then glueing

>the cloth to the shield? I'm wondering if that might be easier,

>particularly for complex heraldic designs.
It's actually easier after. The shield holds the cloth taut, flat, and

still. Painting on unsecured cloth (I just did this on a fighting

mantle) is more difficult.
>3) After you glue the cloth to the shield, do you coat the cloth with

>anything? more glue? gesso?


I suppose you could, but it might make the shield a bit glossy. I

don't.
>4) From your description, you apply the edge hose after the cloth. I

>think I've seen some shields where the cloth is applied over and

>around the edge tubing. I can see where this would have the advantage

>of hiding the ugly mundane tubing. I remember when I made my first

>(and only) shield, I took care to go buy more expensive heater hose

>rather than using old garden hose for a better appearance. If this

>cloth covering can eliminate the need for this, then that cost

>savings could be applied to the cover.
I supply the edge hose partly because I'm lazy. My device has a gold

bordure. Rather than paint the thing, I put on yellow edge hose. I

agree with your statements about the aesthetics of the edging. Of

course, to pur the cloth *over* the edging, you need a stouter

glue--probably a good contact cement. Test your cement on a scrap of

cloth *before* applying it to your shield. Some glues will change the

color of the cloth.
>5) Do cloth covers work on all shapes of shields such as rounds? I

>know that I've seen them on heaters and kite shields.


They should work fine. I believe Erik Wulfriksson used a cloth cover on

his round.


Personally, for a round or oval shield I prefer a different treatment.

Some of the An Tiran knights use a facing of cedar slats adorned with

copper symbols and edged with rawhide.
Along similar lines, one of the sturdiest heaters I've ever seen was

1/8th inch aluminum covered entirely with a piece of rawhide.


>6) Do you just tuck the cloth over the edges of the shield and perhaps

>glue it? Or in the case of plywood shields do you staple or tack it

>down?
I tuck the cloth over the edges and put on the edging hose. The cord I

use to secure the edging also helps keep the cloth in place. I may not

have mentioned, one of the advantages of cloth covers is that it

minimizes the actual amount of painting if you use a sturdy twill,

linen, or trigger in your principal background color.
Sir Lyonel Oliver Grace

Subject: Re: ANST - shield covers

Date: Wed, 17 Mar 99 12:32:41 MST

From: "Joe Wolf"

To:
I fight with a layered wooden heater, that has received many compliments -

it is very period in appearance, and has endured well. It began as a

wetted-plywood base that was curved and allowed to dry (thanks Sir Alexis!)

to which I added hemp-rope edges and a layer of wetted rawhide (using a

woodglue and nails upon the backside). I finished it with a painted, canvas

cover firmly afixed to the rawhide (again with woodglue and nails).


Mark.S Harris asks:

>1) Do you have a particular glue recommendation? A wood glue? Something

>more waterproof? I guess I'm thinking of the recent Gulf Wars and a few

>other events. There often is not space in the tent to store a shield.


Woodglue seems to work fine for the internal structure... but an important

step is the treatment of the wood BEFORE covering, then the treatment of the

canvas cover. Stain your plywood with a waterproofing stain (it saves the

wood and makes the back of the shield look nicer). The canvas cover should

be gesso'd heavily. Apply plenty... then put some more on. Light sanding

between coats makes for a smoother finish (which your artist will

appreciate!) It also waterproofs the face of your shield.
>2) Have you ever tried painting first and then glueing

>the cloth to the shield? I'm wondering if that might be easier, particularly

>for complex heraldic designs.
I made this mistake... put the canvas on the shield FIRST! The design won't

line up properly if you don't. Also, it allows you to stretch the fabric

more tightly across the face of the shield with out cracking or maiming the

painted design. Again, woodglue worked just fine between the canvas and the

face of the shield.
>3) After you glue the cloth to the shield, do you coat the cloth with

>anything? more glue? gesso?


As stated, gesso does the trick... sand between coats.
>4) From your description, you apply the edge hose after the cloth. I

>think I've seen some shields where the cloth is applied over and

>around the edge tubing. I can see where this would have the advantage

>of hiding the ugly mundane tubing.


That's what I did (edging first). It makes for a neater finish, and the

rawhide and canvas save wear/tear on the edging, making the entire piece

last longer. One note I plan on my next shield; some sort of flat metal

flange between the plywood edge and my edging material. Something like

alluminum weather stripping. Make the wood last even longer.
>5) Do cloth covers work on all shapes of shields such as rounds? I

>know that I've seen them on heaters and kite shields.


Using the method I describe, I don't see where shape would be a problem.
>6) Do you just tuck the cloth over the edges of the shield and perhaps

>glue it? Or in the case of plywood shields do you staple or tack it

>down?
Yes, glue and tacks... and an additional note. A piece of gesso'd canvas

gives you a wonderful surface to write some sort of message upon, be it a

period prayer, a sonnet from your paramour, or even just your name.
Herr Manfred von Wolf

Barony of the Stargate

Subject: Re: ANST - shield covers

Date: Wed, 17 Mar 99 14:24:20 MST

From: "Joe Wolf"

To:


>> Yes, glue and tacks... and an additional note. A piece of gesso'd canvas

>>gives you a wonderful surface to write some sort of message upon, be it a

>>period prayer, a sonnet from your paramour, or even just your name.
>Interesting. Would this message be on the front or on the back of the

>shield? I assume the latter. Any indication this was done in period?


On the back... the Museum of London has a German (?) jousting shield

(rounded heater with an extension parallel to ground from upper, sinister

corner) with a Pater Noster ("Our Father?") enscribed where the weilder

would see it if crouched over this shield in a forward riding position.


Herr Manfred von Wolf

Barony of the Stargate

Subject: ANST - Shield Edging

Date: Wed, 17 Mar 99 14:11:44 MST

From: Gunnora Hallakarva

To: ansteorra at Ansteorra.ORG


I have a couple of suggestions for shield edging.
First, Sir Richard ap Morgan uses rawhide to cover the ugly mundane hose

edging on his shields. It looks period, and once you've varnished rawhide

it is almost indestructible. I'd suggest that other types of leather could

be used instead of rawhide (which can be quite expensive) to similar effect

to cover the shield edging.
Also, Sir Burke suggested a really good idea for aluminum shields to help

keep the edges from cutting through the padding so fast. Take tubing

(electrical conduit, copper tubing, etc.) and split it, then apply the

tubing over the edges, wedging the shield rim into the split. Solder or TIG

weld the seam on the tubing, and it will never come loose. Now you have a

round edge rather than a square, possibly jagged edge.


I am presently working on a center grip round. I have successfully applied

small bore copper tubing around the center hole (the hole that allows the

handgrip behind the center shield boss) and it does prevent the edge from

munching up my wrist or gauntlet. I didn't have time to get the outer edge

rimmed before Lyonnesse, but that's the next step. I'm planning on covering

that with high-pressure hose, then rawhide laced on with rawhide strips, and

I may set grommets through the lacing holes to

help lengthen the life of the lacing material.


Like Sir Lyonel, I have faced my aluminum street-sign shield with cloth --

you can't get the applied reflective material off a street sign without

sandblasting, and the stuff won't take paint worth a darn! I used a

long-set 2-part epoxy (takes 30 minutes to set up) so I'd have time to work,

then I applied a very thin layer using a trowel over the entire face of the

shield. My cloth went down over the epoxy, and I smoothed it carefully by

hand to work out as many of the air bubbles as possible. I

have been told that you have to use a natural muslin or other natural cloth,

as chemical interactions between poly-blend cloths and the glue can cause

the fabric to deteriorate quickly. Lyonel's correct in stating that the

cloth takes paint beautifully.
::GUNNORA::

Date: Sun, 07 Nov 1999 09:21:55 MST

From: "j'lynn yeates"

Subject: Re: ANST - Shield Blanks

To: ansteorra at Ansteorra.ORG
On 7 Nov 99, at 10:36, Jeff Smith wrote:

> Does anyone have an email address or web site for titanium shield blanks?


don't have a address, but know of a soviet salvage yard that for american

green, i am sure they would let you rip apart scrapped soviet sub hulls or

aeroframes ....
seriously, the question must me asked *why* ...
titanium has many real unique properties, but thanks to the media of this age,

people tend to get hooked onto the "fantasy" aspects of it ... the reality is

that the metal in sheet that large is *expensive* and hard to find (industrial

metal, high demand, low supply, most locked up in military & aeorspace

contracts ...), and very difficult to work in civilian home shops (just try

getting a curve to hold in it .. not to mention cutting, drilling, finishing

(having worked it as exotic jewelry on a small scale and having made a sword

out of a piece of bar stock that was mistakenly thrown out that was salvaged

...), and it does pose safety hazards when working it - at industrial levels

the dust is nasty stuff and prone to spontaneous ignition.


a much saner apparoach would be a good, generally available aluminum alloy ..

about same weight, widely available in sheets and shield blanks, far cheaper

and easier to work, and for SCA uses totally adequate ... basically, titanium

would offer *zero* benefits in this arena, all expense and problems.


'wolf

Date: Sun, 07 Nov 1999 10:45:16 MST

From: "j'lynn yeates"

Subject: ANST - exotica ... was: Shield Blanks

To: ansteorra at Ansteorra.ORG
On 7 Nov 99, at 16:34, Jeff Smith wrote:

> Excellent points. That said, I'm just a middle man. Members of my group

> are looking for titanium (it's "shield envy"...I have titanium), so I'm just

> looking to see if any is still available.

>

> I will pass your excellent points along to them, and I thank you.


based on those points, seriously doubt that you will find anyone with shield

sized blanks .. about all i've ever been able to find are small strips, wire,

and the occasional (rare and/or expensive) bar stock ... taking a wild guess

slightly based on past experience, *if* you could find a metal supplier to

fulfill the order, a "blank" of that size would probably run $200-300 range

(possibly more) for materials and fabrication since it would be a "one of" job

...
added consideration, i'm not even sure that it's commonly rolled in a guage

that would make a shield a practicality (a shield is useful becuase of it's

mass, absorbing energy). in the commonaly avaialble sheet guages i have seen,

you will end up with a thin sheet that will transfer the energy into your arm

instead of dampening it. i have personal experience with a large steel round

that did just that ... transferred the blows energy through it's matrix into

your arm, numbing it short order, no matter how well mounted / padded it was

.. not to mention ringing like a bell. while the aluminum models i've

experimented with over the years are much more intert, especially when a

"aluminum over wood" design is used


back to cost issues, once you factor in the materials, fab charges, your

fabrication time, aggravation, and tools (you'll go through a lot of blades and

bits) needed to make the blank a shield, and your talking a potential $500 plus

combat shield (call it the "pentagon model" ... and i think that's probbaly on

the conservative side) that's more a show-piece than a functional combat

shield.


and after all that it's still going to be *flat* (try curving / dishing a small

jewelry blank and you'll see what i mean) unless you have a industrial class

hydraulic press sitting around and a framework to rivet it to so it holds it's

shape.
makes the aluminum (already exotic and controversial enough) much more

attractive, eh? this exact subject has been the center of more than one bar-

discussion over the years.


titanium armour has always been a great fantasy (25 years worth of experience

with that one ...) but like all fantasies, when you start applying the

realities of the matter it quickly fades in practicality .... making small-

scale (*flat*) jewelry out of it is hard enough (and i didn't even get into the

nasty acids and high voltages needed to produce the wonderful colorations that

make it so attractive ... this and the fabrication problems mentioned are main

reason most go to niobium instead)
'wolf

Date: Mon, 08 Nov 1999 04:48:03 MST

From: "Lorraine and/or Kief"

Subject: Re: ANST - Shield Blanks...Shield Standards

To: ansteorra at Ansteorra.ORG
Heilsa Janos and all other Good and True Ansteorran Combatants...
It was written:

>From: "Jeff Smith"


>Excellent points. That said, I'm just a middle man. Members of my group

>are looking for titanium (it's "shield envy"...I have titanium), so I'm

>just looking to see if any is still available.
Good my Friends, I would remind everyone that there _are_ minimum weight

standards for shields. To wit:


SECTION 3.III. SHIELD STANDARDS.
A. Shields and Bucklers:
1. Shall have a comparable weight to those constructed with period

materials. A minimum of one pound (1 lb) per square foot should be used as

base guidelines.
[Note - I believe Sir Kief is quoting from the Ansteorra regulations, here. This may or may not apply to other SCA kingdoms - Stefan]
>I will pass your excellent points along to them, and I thank you.
Please pass along this information as well.
>Janos
Waes Thu Hael fellow Combatant...

Kief - EM Ansteorra

Date: Thu, 23 Dec 1999 09:37:49 MST

From: Michael Gunter

Subject: Re: ANST - need new shield for husband

To: ansteorra at Ansteorra.ORG


> Help! My husband wants a new aluminum shield for Christmas.
> Does anyone know a web site or phone number for me to call...I'm

> not trying to actually GET it by Sat...I just wanted to be able to tell HIM

> where to go to get it.

> thanks,

> gwyneth
Try The Armour Store, http://204.210.12.252/armourstore/index.htm.

They have a nice selection.


Gunthar

Date: Thu, 23 Dec 1999 10:03:59 MST

From: Michael Gunter

Subject: Re: ANST - need new shield for husband

To: ansteorra at Ansteorra.ORG
Anshelm Arms, http://www.anshelmarms.com, has T6 Aluminum in 24"

x 36" for $75 in stock.


Gunthar

Date: Thu, 23 Dec 1999 09:53:22 MST

From: "Caley Woulfe"

Subject: ANST - Shield Search

To: "Ansteorran List"
Try Red Falcon Armory. When you go the catalogue, use the text links, not

the graphics/bars; they don't work. The text links are below the bars.I

recommend this company highly....
http://redfalcon.home.mindspring.com/
Caoillainn De Bhulbh, She-Wolf of Limerick

Date: Thu, 23 Dec 1999 11:40:47 MST

From: Michael Gunter

Subject: Re: ANST - advice on which shield blank

To: ansteorra at Ansteorra.ORG
> I really can't see much

> difference between the Armor Store product and the Anshelmarms place except

> the price. Any comments would be helpful...anyone order anything from any

> of these places?


The real difference between the Armour Store and Anshel Arms is that the

Armour Store's shields are 24" x 32" and Anshelm's is 24" x 36". You can

also get shields fully strapped and edged with a shield basket from the

Armour Store.


I've heard good things about both companies.
> gwyneth
Gunthar

Date: Fri, 18 Feb 2000 12:08:03 -0600

From: Amy Forsyth

Subject: Re: ANST - Re: The Book of Fencing

To: stefan at texas.net
Stefan,
I sent this to ANST-list, but it hasn't posted; although Yoomi did receive

his copy.


~Adela
Talhoffer, Hans (fl. 15th cent.)

"Livre d'escrime de Talhoffer (Code de Gotha) de l'an 1467: representant

les combats singuliers et judiciaires"

publie par Gustave Hergsell, avec 268 planches en photogravures

Prague: G. Hergsell, 1901
46 p., 270 leaves of plates: facsims.; 30 cm.

"Il a ete tire de cette edition 50 exemplaires numerotes"-- T.p. verso.


OCLC #13203545
>Greetings to the fencers on the Ansteorra list,

>

>This gentleman in Switzerland is looking for the bibliographic info



>on a period rapier book. He used a search engine and found a partial

>referance to the book he seeks in my shields-msg file in the COMBAT

>section of my Florilegium. Unfortunately, I believe this is the only

>referance to this book in my files.

>

>I am hoping that someone on this list can answer his questions or



>forward this note to perhaps the rapier maillist if no one here has

>the answers.

>

>Please send him a copy of any correspondance by email since he is



>not on the lists. Of course I would love the answer also, so that

>I may place it in the Florilegium for folks to have in the future.

>

>His email is: yoomi.steffen at olympic.org



>

>Thanks for any help anyone can give.

>

>Stefan li Rous



>------------------------------------------

>Yoo-Mi Steffen wrote:

>> Dear Stefan,

>>


>> First of all I would like to present myself. My name is Yoo-Mi and I

>> am in charge of the Olympic Museum's Library in Lausanne, Switzerland.

>>

>> I was looking for an old book, very famous among fencers. After my



>> research on the web (Thalhofer and fencing on Metacrawler.com), your

>> site was referenced in the first place.

>> Could you be kind enough to give me - if possible of course - the

>> complete reference of the following book :

>> "Book of fencing : code de Gotha" by Hans Thalhofer, 1467

>> The place of publication, the editor or printer would be very valuable

>> informations.

>>


>> Thank you in advance and kindest regards,

>> Yoo-Mi Steffen (Ms.)

>> Head of Library

From: "David W. James"

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: More Re: viking shields

Date: Mon, 19 Jun 2000 23:45:02 GMT
You should look for a copy of 'Early Anglo-Saxon Shields", by Tania Dickinson

and Heinrich Härke (H-umlaut a-rke), volume 110 of Archaelogia, The Society

of Antiquaries of London, 1992. ISBN 0-85431-260-9. It was 25 Pounds new, I

found a used copy for 18 back in '97. Neat book, right up your alley.


David/Kwellend-Njal

Date: Wed, 23 Aug 2000 10:29:23 -0400

From: "Matt Beaudoin"

To:

Subject: Re: Norman Kit shield
> Has anyone seen a pattern for this type [Norman Kite shield] around ?

> Mel
I know how to make one, I just don't know how to describe it... Below is my

lame attempt to begin describing it. I have made about 30 of these, but I

have always taught hands on.....hrmpf....

lothar
[Norman Kite Shields are pretty Simple....when I make my kites, I just

inscribe a semi circle equal in diameter to the shoulder width of the owner.

from the ends of the semi circle, I draw a pair of lines down towards a

point. That point should be imagined as being about 6 inches off the ground

if the shield is held at shoulder height. The kite does not come to a

point, however. Hold the shield in a guard position and mark approximately

3 inches below the knee. Mark that line. Now, to dish the shield, you need

to cut a line from the center point of the semicircle to the base of the

shield. Then measure one inch]

Date: Thu, 24 Aug 2000 16:28:18 -0400

From: "Matt Beaudoin"

To:

Subject: Re: Norman Kit shield
> I'm understand up to

>

> >Now, to dish the shield, you need



> to cut a line from the center point of the semicircle to the base of the

> shield. Then measure one inch]--

>

> Do you mean the semicircle at the top ? One inch where ?



>

> Mel
I stopped mid thought because I was confusing myself...

basically, you get a line from the center of the semicircle to the base

(perpendicular to the bottom), then make a parallel line to it, that way you

can fold on layer over the other and rivet through the two layers. Be sure

to drill a hole in the center of the semicircle (the intersection of the

radii), this will relieve strain from the fold. You will also need a

'boss', or a piece of Aluminum that can cover the sharp edge that will be

from that center hole down approximately 5 inches. After that, the overlap

is substantial enough that you can hammer the top Aluminum fold flat against

the lower....Someday I will write this up with 8x10 color glossy photos with

circles and arrows and a paragraph on the back of each one...


hope this doesn't confuse too much,

Lothar


Date: Fri, 25 Aug 2000 16:22:20 -0400

From: "Matt Beaudoin"

To:

Subject: Re: Norman Kit shield


oh, basics...my shields are T-5 aluminum with an aluminum boss made from the

scraps... Don't think of a boss like on a center grip round, these are just

a veneer of aluminum over the sharp bits where the fold comes together...I

used the same kite with an aluminum boss for 7 years before retiring the

whole shield for a new one. My master, Feral, used the same shield for 15

years before retiring his because one of my not so tiny squire brothers

decided to crease the bottom edge pretty good....
The fold is an overlap of one side of the kite over the other. This causes

the entire thing to dish. An alternative technique involves using 2 layers

of birch plywood, a curving jig of some sort, and lots and lots of wood glue.

I haven't made a wooden one, so don't ask for details, I ain't got none

:)..... Just a word of advice...you might not want to try to learn from a

stick jock, we can swing a stick, but aren't very articulate....at least I'm

not....
LTW

Date: Sun, 03 Sep 2000 04:58:38 -0400

From: rmhowe

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: Norman Kite shield
Marine plywood and exterior plywood frequently have the same glue.

Marine plywood can be bought in some pretty exotic varieties of wood.


The principal difference between them though is that marine plywood

lacks internal voids in the plys that would trap water and cause rot.


You can take several fingers and run them across the surface of

plywood.


If you encounter a void in the ply it will pick up immediately with

a change in tone.


Since you won't be trying to join sheets to sheets to get long pieces

I won't go into scarfing practice here needed to join longer sheets.


Save your money. Pet the wood. Listen. You'll hear the void.
Around these here parts people normally laminate two quarter inch

sheets over a shield press which is a frame shaped a bit overmuch

the curve you want (accounting for some springback) with a water

proof glue such as resourcinol, Titebond II, or one of those new

Urethane glues like Gorilla. Some weight it, some clamp it.
Stick jocks are unmistakable. First time you get downwind you'll

recognize one at a quarter mile ever after. Some are sneaky, some

are dumb as doornails. All are potential organ donors. They wear

armor, they clank, they smell like horses and sweat and mold.


Magnus
Melanie Wilson wrote:

>


> > the entire thing to dish. An alternative technique involves using 2 layers

> of birch plywood, a curving jig of somesort, and lots and lots of wood glue.

> I haven't made a wooden one, so don't ask for details, I ain't got none >

>

> I will be making it of wood as near as possible to the period construction,



> we tend to use Marine ply, for cost as much as anything, but have a few

> plank ones for display, rather than fighting, the ones I've made before at

> round 'poached egg types' and friends have made heaters. Bending I'm told

> can be achieved by soaking & bending with lorry tie downs around a barrel or

> similar

>


> <:)..... Just a word of advice...you might not want to try to learn from a

> stick jock, we can swing a stick, but aren't very articulate....at least I'm

> not.... >

>


> What is a stick jock ?

>


> Mel

From: Nils K Hammer

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Copper - Historical uses ??

Date: Thu, 9 Nov 2000 18:57:14 -0500
The historical shields I saw a couple of weeks ago in Europe were

all covered in rawhide, and none had metal edging. This of course is

only a small sample of shields, and none of them were "heaters".
nils

From: Ulf Gunnarsson [ulfie at mmcable.com]

Sent: Sunday, April 07, 2002 9:08 PM

To: Ansteorra

Subject: [Ansteorra] Round Shields
Question for those who do weapons and armor research, especially fighters:
Why did Vikings use round shields so much?
I've got a theory, but first the negatives. Here are some of the reasons

why I think these northern Europeans would have picked a different shape:


Heaters and other shapes seem more effective in combat.

I understand that the average fighter finds a round shield to take more

effort than other shapes.

It seems that a square object is easier to build and less wasteful of wood

than a round object.
The clues that I have for my theory are the numerous accounts of single

combat in the sagas that mention chunks getting cut out of shields. One of

the law books required one to take three shields with you to a holmgang

(duel), just because of this damage to the shield. Another clue is in the

design of the shields themselves with a rim of material around the edge.

And the last clue is in changes in SCA helmet design.


My theory is that the reinforced edge of a round shield was meant to deflect

a sword shot. Real swords would skip off the edge of a round shield much

easier than SCA swords. Over time we has seen the disappearance of the flat

topped helm in the SCA in favor of the round or bullet shape for much the

same reason. A real sword would be expected by the fighter to cut into a

real shield and eventually into the fighter behind it. This does not happen

in the SCA with rattan swords, so it is something we never worry about.
I'd be interested in playing with this theory a little bit, but some other

questions immediately come up. Why did the round shield disappear? Was

there a change in sword steel quality at the same time as its disappearance?

Was it a cultural assimilation thing? Was it due to a change in military

tactics? Is there something I'm overlooking here?
If someone has a few sources to help support the tenets of the theory or to

help answer the questions, I'd appreciate a little more info.


Thanks,

Ulf Gunnarsson, OL

From: C. L. Ward [gunnora at vikinganswerlady.org]

Sent: Sunday, April 07, 2002 9:35 PM

To: ansteorra at ansteorra.org

Subject: RE: [Ansteorra] Round Shields


>My theory is that the reinforced edge of a

>round shield was meant to deflect a sword shot.


Ulf, I think your understanding of the Viking round shield is way off. The

edges are not just *not* reinforced, they're thinner than the rest of the

shield. I think that the idea was to allow your opponent to chop into the

shield edge, whereupon you'd viciously wrench the handle and try to either

bend the weapon or jerk it out of the foeman's grasp altogether. We run

into occasional mentions in holmgang descriptions of people having second,

backup swords, and of fighters having to straighten their sword blades

during a fight.


There's an outstanding article available on Viking shields:
Beatson, Peter. "The 'Viking Shield' from Archaeology." NVG Miklagard.

2000. http://members.ozemail.com.au/~chrisandpeter/shield/shield.html


The relevant points he makes about shields are these:
Shields were typically 80-90 cm in diameter. The board was flat, and made of

a single layer of planks butted together. The planks were usually only 6-10

mm thick, and were bevelled even thinner at the outer edge. There is no

archaeological evidence for laminated (ie. cross-ply) construction though

contemporary poetry and slightly later legislation suggests it. Continuous

gutter-shaped metal edge bindings like those known from Vendel, V‰lsgarde,

and Thorsbjerg were obsolete by the Viking Age. In the vast majority of

finds there is no evidence of edge reinforcement, which must therefore have

been absent, or of a perishable nature. On the Gokstad shields, small holes

are bored about 2 cm in from the edge, at intervals of c.3.5 cm , presumably

to fasten a rim, all other traces of which have perished. It can be

speculated that the edge was bound with a leather strip fastened with

stitches or thongs, or possibly very fine iron nails.
::GUNNORA::

From: David Hughes [davidjhughes.tx at netzero.net]

Sent: Monday, April 08, 2002 7:52 PM

To: ansteorra at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Ansteorra] Round Shields
Ulf Gunnarsson wrote:

> Question for those who do weapons and armor research, especially fighters:

> Why did Vikings use round shields so much?
SNIP

> I'd be interested in playing with this theory a little bit, but some other

> questions immediately come up. Why did the round shield disappear? Was

> there a change in sword steel quality at the same time as its disappearance?

> Was it a cultural assimilation thing? Was it due to a change in military

> tactics? Is there something I'm overlooking here?

>

> If someone has a few sources to help support the tenets of the theory or to



> help answer the questions, I'd appreciate a little more info.

>

> Ulf Gunnarsson, OL


Round shields are fast, easy to maneuver, and very easy to run with.

Great for solo and small unit skirmishing. Not too good for

overlapping in large formations or turtling against missile fire.
Scotums, kites and other large heaters, rectangles are more static, a

pain to run with, but overlap very well, work great in large marching

formations, and can turtle up against arrows, spears, sling bullets

and even small ballista projectiles.


David Gallowglass

From: "Jay and Diane Rudin"

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: shield straps

Date: Sat, 17 May 2003 15:32:37 -0500
"kurt bowker" asked:

> I have seen modern illustrations of dark age foot soldiers (viking,

> norman, saxon, what have you) using their shield straps in combat.

>

> Is there any period evidence for this that anyone knows of?


Dark Age? I don't know. Period? Yes (almost).
The book, *Mars, His Field* (1608), is a series of woodcuts showing how to

carry pike with buckler and sword, or sword and shield, into battle.

Successive plates show how a pikeman should march, ready his pike, slide his

round shield around to his left arm, wield pike with round shield, and

eventually drop the pike and ready the sword. It goes on to show him

sheathe the sword, slide the shield back around, and pick up the pike. He

is always wearing the strap, but it is not shown as having any use except to

bear the shield when it's on his back.


The next set of plates show a swordsman with a large heater shield. The

shield starts on the warrior's back held by the strap. It is turned to the

front without removing the strap, and the sword is then drawn.
So the strap seems to have no particular purpose while the shield's on your

arm. It's to carry the shield to and from the battle, and is (presumably)

not in the way when you fight.
Robin of Gilwell / Jay Rudin

From: David Serhienko

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Source for plywood shield blanks?

Date: Sun, 19 Jun 2005 11:12:02 -0500
Michael Grossberg wrote:

> "David Friedman" wrote

>> jankin wrote:

>>

>>I probably made my first curved plywood shield close on thirty years



>>ago--using a bathtub not a kiddie pool. Given the work involved in

>>getting from the shield blank to the shield, I would on the whole prefer

>>one done by someone who does a better job than I do, in terms of both

>>uniformity and quality. Soaking plywood for several days may have a

>>deleterious effect on the glue that holds the layers together, or the

>>wood.


>>

>>If I were making it myself I would probably skip most or all of the

>>soaking, and use several thin layers on a shield press. But I'm not.

>>--


>>David/Cariadoc

>>www.daviddfriedman.com

>

> Of course, My Lord, you _could_ always buy a metal shield blank that was



> already curved. I've seen enough of them at Pennsic.

> Gardr Gunnarsson


My undersanding was that you were looking for a curved plywood blank?
If a metallic shield is more to your liking, many people who frequent

the Armour Archive seem to hold the following two armories in high esteem:

http://www.mandrakearmory.com (6061 T-6 Aircraft Aluminum)

http://www.icefalcon.com/ (T100 aluminum)


For curved plywood, consider GAA armories:

GAA_armouries at yahoo.com They make an birch curved heater using 8 layers

and marine glue. Should be suitably strong and durable.
Deykin

From: Christie Ward

Date: January 25, 2006 9:31:45 AM CST

To: ansteorra at ansteorra.org

Subject: RE: [Ansteorra] Research help
> I need some help/direction for research. I am wanting to start a

> tooled leather shield cover, but have only found a few sources online.


The problem may be that word "online". Remember that libraries are

your friends! And almost all university libraries have their card

catalogs available via the internet these days, so you can check to

see if resources that might help you are available and where.


Texas and Oklahoma also have some good interlibrary loan systems set

up cooperatively between the state universities and the public

library systems, so if you can't get to the university library to

look at something, ask the reference desk librarian at your public

library - they may be able to get it for you!
You left out a critical area here, and that the information about the

time period and culture the shield should represent. Something that's

appropriate for 10th century Scandinavia may not be appropriate for

15th century Milan, and vice versa.


If you are interested in Norse shields with leather facings, I highly

recommend one well-researched online source, Peter Beatson's The

'Viking Shield' from Archaeology (http://members.ozemail.com.au/

~chrisandpeter/shield/shield.html). There is no evidence for

tooling, but some leather faced shields were gessoed and painted.
You should also consider the question whether what we consider

"tooling" today is an appropriate leather technique for your period.

For early northern Europe, designs were not cut then bevelled to high

relief. The most common designs are either geometric cut patterns

with no embossing (rows of diagonal lines, chevrons, etc.), or else

they're pure embossing with no cutting.


Another thing to be aware of is that what we call "tooling" is

usually referred to as "stamping" or "embossing" in medieval

contexts, while "tooling" refers to gilding. Be careful when you are

reading!
Good luck on your project!


::GUNNVOR::

From: Goedjn


Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Beginner Shield Edging Questions

Date: Mon, 09 Apr 2007 15:23:30 -0400

Organization: University of Rhode Island
On 9 Apr 2007 11:45:09 -0700, cwhite2812 at dslextreme.com wrote:
>Fast forward and its become nessecary for our group to turn out some

>less utilitarian and more "period" looking weapons and shields for

>performances. The weapons have been fairly easy, again with the help

>of numerous SCA documents and a good rattan supplier nearby, but the

>shield edging specifically has me baffled. With a proper basket,

>boss, and stain, the shield looks just fine, but without the edging,

>its strictly not battle-ready. Given that the looks on this 2nd round

>of shields is important, brown duct tape just doesn't cut it so I am

>searching for a way to either cover the pipe foam or find another

>edging material that is equally capable but perhaps easier to

>disguise. I've seen some weather stripping that comes in adhesive

... more deleted....

>apart problems since its not covered. I have tried covering it with

>some reasonable looking cloth, which quickly disintegrated in combat.

>

>In most of the SCA documents I've seen, the recommended edging is some



>form of plumbing line (heat hose, irrigation hose, flexibile supply

>line, etc.) and its attached by drilling holes and roping the edging

>down. While this protects the edge of the weapons, it doesn't appear

>to afford much padding.


Multiple layers of hose actually gives more padding than you'd

think. I assume that bicycle tires would fail your appearance

standards.
>I'd appreciate any suggestions or tips from the more experienced

>armorers and wielders. I'm open to fundamental design changes if they

>achieve the goal and am prepared for the "you just can't get there

>from here" but am hopeful a good solution can be found.

>

>Chris
Depends on whether you're looking for "authentic", or



are willing to settle for "plausible".
And at what range it has to look right. For the plausible,

Cover the edge with whatever was working before, and cover

that with thin leather, or faux leather, or garden hose

with colors that you can claim look like leather

or snakeskin.
Seatbelt webbing should solve the "disintigrating cloth" problem,

Dog-leash webbing is probably too narrow to work.

Web-search on "nylon webbing".
Rope would make a good edging material too, if you can figure out a

way to hold it in place.


For "authentic", you need to find some covering for the

padding that looks like metal, because my limited understanding

is that, if a medieval shield was edged at all, it would be

with the toughest metal available.


--Goedjn

From: David Friedman

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Beginner Shield Edging Questions

Date: Mon, 09 Apr 2007 12:37:35 -0700
cwhite2812 at dslextreme.com wrote:
> Fast forward and its become nessecary for our group to turn out some

> less utilitarian and more "period" looking weapons and shields for

> performances. The weapons have been fairly easy, again with the help

> of numerous SCA documents and a good rattan supplier nearby, but the

> shield edging specifically has me baffled. With a proper basket,

> boss, and stain, the shield looks just fine, but without the edging,

> its strictly not battle-ready.
What I have used for some time is:
Over the wood edge, a strip of scrap wool multiple layers deep.
Over that, in particularly vulnerable places, a strip of thick

rawhide--like what they use for dog chews.


Over the whole thing a strip of leather--8 ounce or more.
The leather I slightly water harden--meaning immersing it in 180 degree

water just until it goes limp. When you pull it out it is stretchy, so

will form fit over the shield edge. If you leave it in longer than that

it gets harder but also more brittle. You could probably do it just

soaking in cold water, but it wouldn't be as stretchy.

--


http://www.daviddfriedman.com/ http://daviddfriedman.blogspot.com/

Author of _Harald_, a fantasy without magic.

Published by Baen, in bookstores now

From: Bernard Wright

Date: February 5, 2008 6:06:05 AM CST

To: Barony of Bryn Gwlad

Subject: Re: [Bryn-gwlad] Request for information
I sent him the info for Cat's site fromt the Armour Archieve, she has some nice stuff for shields, posted info here too if anyone elsed wanted to take a look at it. -barnet

 

http://www.freewebs.com/catherinesquest/index.htm



 

Myfanwy ferch Eifion wrote:



<<< I received a phone call today from a gentleman named Bob who is looking for

a place to purchase a Viking shield boss. He is not in the SCA but is

making a Viking shield and wants to have something appropriate.
Myfanwy >>>

From: maxengel at aol.com

To: rschriber at austin.rr.com

Sent: Mon, 4 Feb 2008 9:02 pm

Subject: Viking sheild boss
I understand that you are looking for a Viking shield boss.  I make shield bosses and have documentation for a variety for different styles including Viking ones.  Any Idea what you want it to look like?  A rough date?  Heat treated steel?  Mild steel (heavier)?  Let me know if you want to talk.
Max

North Star Armoury

25 years and still have fingers

From: YsfaelEleanor at aol.com

Date: June 23, 2008 8:59:19 AM CDT

To: ansteorra at lists.ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Ansteorra] Closed cell foam....
tomjenkins at suddenlink.net writes:

<<< Can anyone suggest a place or company where I can find 1/4 inch closed cell

foam? I have plenty of 1/2 inch, but I really need the 1/4 inch for certain

pieces of my armor. Thanks! >>>
Auto upholstery shops will know where it can be purchased or will sometimes

sell you some. An auto upholstery supply house, if you can find one. BTW,

this is a good place to get the snap edge vinyl shield edging some people use

for metal shields. An auto upholsterer supply house will know it as door

edge guard and it comes in about 14 colors.
Ysfael

From: Eric Brown

Date: August 22, 2010 5:25:34 PM CDT

To: bryn-gwlad at lists.ansteorra.org, Shire of Ffynnon Gath

Subject: [Bryn-gwlad] Take your shield boss to the next level?
http://www.talerwin.com/sheilds.htm

From: Gavin Kinkade

Date: June 13, 2011 1:27:42 PM CDT

To: "trimaris-temp at yahoogroups.com"

Subject: Re: [tri-temp] Question on shield material
<<< Question on shield material

 


Looking to build a new round shield but wanting to find a good material to make it out of. Trying to avoid aluminum was looking for something cheaper wood wise. I want something light but strong or at least as good as wood can get. Not sure of what would make the best material. Any suggestions?

Pomestnik Dmitrii Ivanov >>>


I have used with success layers of Lauan glued together. Meranti/Lauan is a beautiful hardwood plywood
. It is available at Home Depot and Lowes

3 layers makes a great war shield, 2 layers for most other shields

.
Lord Gavin Kyncade



Marcaster Archery and Thrown weapons Ranger


Squire to Sir Takamatsu


Apprentice to Maitresse Aspasia Moonwind


Cadet to Don Tomas Mac Coran
gavin.kinkade at yahoo.com
727-320-5490



From: mkendrick01 at msn.com

Subject: RE: [tri-temp] Question on shield material

Date: June 13, 2011 1:44:01 PM CDT

To: trimaris-temp at yahoogroups.com
I was going to recommend the layered approach as well using plywood. Make sure you cross grain the layers for the best strength.
MK

From: trimaris at gmail.com

Subject: Re: {TheTriskeleTavern} Re: [tri-temp] Question on shield material

Date: June 13, 2011 6:32:18 PM CDT

To: the-triskele-tavern at googlegroups.com
<<< Something I have found to extend the life of a wood shield is to put

metal braces on the edge. If you have sheet steel, aluminum, or road

signs you can cut them to round shape in sections and attach them with

pop rivets. Don't forget the heater hose.


- Gavine Armestrang >>>
As far as extending the life of the shield, Lord Gavine has the right of it. I use "U" channel and clip it to fit the curve.

A more period solution is to use rawhide for the shield edges instead of the hose or car door edging you see. A good pet store will have the really large rawhide chew "bones" for dogs. Soak those till soft, put shape them and put them on while wet. Lace up and they dry veddy hard and durable.


From: garmestrang at gmail.com

Subject: Re: {TheTriskeleTavern} Re: [tri-temp] Question on shield material

Date: June 13, 2011 6:43:08 PM CDT

To: the-triskele-tavern at googlegroups.com
Can also get rawhide strips at Tandy. Not as cheap, but easier to work with. Just be careful with how wet you get it. It'll "melt".
- Gavine

From: gavin.kinkade at yahoo.com

Subject: Re: [tri-temp] Question on shield material

Date: June 14, 2011 3:57:55 AM CDT

To: trimaris-temp at yahoogroups.com
From: Stefan li Rous:

<<< I'm not Gavin, but you should be able to use wood glue. It's best to

put glue on one side of each piece of plywood, then put the two glued

faces together and place weights on top, like books or fitness weights

or whatever. Some glue may squeeze out the edges, simply wipe that off

with a paper towel or wet rag.
This is for a flat shield. A curved shield is a bit different. >>>
lowes and home depot sell wood glue. Titebond 2 or Titebond 3 are my recomendations. 2 is water resistant, and 3 is water proof (when dry) Elmers works but not water resistant, and here in Florida its humid and full of water.

Yes you want to apply glue to both faces of the wood that will be glued together. You want to evenly coat both surfaces, so apply the glue and use a stiff plastic card or epoxy spreader to spread the glue out on the surface, do not have any dry spots of wood.

Place the two glued faces together and lay on a flat surface. Place weights, books, heavy stuff on the shield. Also make sure to lay down wax paper under the shield or the excess glue will squeeze out onto the floor or where ever you layed the shield down at. I use a bunch of 10 and 25 lbs weights from my bar bell set. but a crap load of big heavy books works too. Whatever use use make sure to cover the entire shield evenly with weights so as to as uniformly as possible apply pressure while the glue dries.

Lord Gavin Kyncade


Marcaster Archery and Thrown weapons Ranger

Squire to Sir Takamatsu

Apprentice to Maitresse Aspasia Moonwind

Cadet to Don Tomas Mac Coran





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