Northup, Solomon. Twelve Years a slave (New York: Penguin Books, 2012). (461)


Hackett Fischer, David. “Champlain among the Mohawk, 1690.”



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Hackett Fischer, David. “Champlain among the Mohawk, 1690.” Chaplain’s Dream (2008): 24-27. (4)
David Fischer states in his piece, “Champlain among the Mohawk, 1690”, that Champlain knew that some of the world’s evils overshadow even war.4 This statement is a prime example of the pieces discussed this week; those highlighting individuals who were not necessarily normal in their leading of colonies and expeditions into the Americas. Champlain’s interaction with the Mohawk is one which remains perhaps the most interesting in that he never looked to being a war between the natives, but instead worked towards a “coalition of Montagnais, Algonquian, and Huron, with French support” as a means to deter further warfare between the groups and the Mohawk. This perspective, as well as the further pieces in the reading, is unique in that there is rarely popular record of individuals choosing to help the natives instead of slaughter them.

Individuals like Champlain helped to create an interesting dynamic in the modern day learning of history in that his story is never heard of until post-secondary schooling. This is a failure on society’s part in that there is only teachings of full force, in example the French and Spanish rivalry over Florida. As Fischer nicely ties up his piece with, “Champlain’s policy affected a middle way of peace through the carefully calibrated use of limited force”.5 Champlain’s story of limited force creates a sense of hope that there are other stories like this that just aren’t as mainstream, while also creating conflict in that there easily could not be. Champlain’s interaction with the Mohawk could easily remain a one in a million story, but as we will further read, it easily may not.






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