Northup, Solomon. Twelve Years a slave (New York: Penguin Books, 2012). (461)


Hadingham, Evan. “America’s First Immigrants.”



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Hadingham, Evan. “America’s First Immigrants.” Smithsonian (2004): 91-98. (8)

Hadingham’s piece collaborating on theories regarding the first immigrants to North America follows a logic rarely explored outside of the Anthropological field. “America’s First Immigrants” follows studies theorizing the relationship between Clovis era manifestations and the spread of similar tools throughout Europe, with hundreds of years in between. Primarily a thought which is knocked down in modern society, as well as within the Anthropological world itself, Hadingham takes the works of various scientists, including Michael Collins, Douglas Wallace and Dennis Stanford, and asks his audience to question exactly who were America’s first immigrants.

Hadingham’s first concentration of data and research suggests that there is in fact a different way to view the migration to the Americas than that of the Siberian route. Instead, one can incline that this different suggestion of population could easily manipulate the way one thinks of the history of the Americas. Hadingham continues on this stream of thought by citing the work of Wallace, who was able to, though working with mitochondrial DNA, discover that there were, at minimum, four different generations of migration – wit the earliest being 20,000 years ago. The findings of these scientists and the work of Hadingham suggest a new way to view the start of the America’s, as well as a new way to view history. Instead of contributing to read into what the history books grant access to, Hadingham’s audience is able to see that there can be different explanation for every question; it’s all about perspective. This bit of knowledge can call on a nearly innate yearning to know where one “comes from” and continue the search through ancestry roots.




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