Nautical words


Wind Gall. Luminous edge of a cloud to windward. Supposed to indicate approach of a storm. Winding



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Wind Gall. Luminous edge of a cloud to windward. Supposed to indicate approach of a storm.

Winding. Turning a vessel end for end between buoys, or alongĀ­side a wharf or pier.

Winding Tackle. Large purchase, comprising three-fold block aloft and double block in lower end. Secured at lower masthead and used for lifting heavy weights.

Windjammer. Colloquial name for a sailing vessel.

Windlass. Machine working on a horizontal axis and used for working cable. Usually has two sprocket wheel's for holding cables, and warping drums at extremities of shaft. Actuated by steam or electricity. Gearing is provided so that one or both sprocket wheels can be meshed with engine shaft. Brakes are provided for holding cable holders when disconnected from shaft. Old types were hand-worked.

Windlass Bitts. Vertical timbers in which hand-worked windlasses were formerly mounted.

Wind Lipper. Slight disturbance of sea surface by a wind that has just arisen.

Windmill. Formerly carried by Scandinavian sailing vessels for actuating bilge pumps.

Wind Rode. Said of a vessel at anchor when the directions of her head and cable are to windward.

Wind Rose. Intersecting lines, on a weather chart, showing direcĀ­tions, frequencies, and strengths of wind in that locality over a certain time.

Wind Sail. Large tube of canvas with a shaped mouth that can be trimmed to the wind by lines. Used for conveying air to spaces below upper deck.


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