Nationalism or Sectionalism? Nationalism



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Nationalism or Sectionalism?
Nationalism is the belief that stresses the national welfare ahead of sectional or regional concerns. It also states that leaders give top priority to national interests in foreign affairs.
Among the people of a country, nationalism means having a strong feeling of being a part of the nation and sharing the nation’s culture and heritage with the rests of the population. Nationalism often shows itself in the peoples’ patriotism, in their pride in the country and its heroes and leaders, and in loyalty to what the nation stands for.
Sectionalism is valuing the interests of your region over the interests of the nation as a whole.

Example 1: From the War of 1812, the Battle of New Orleans became a source of legends about American superiority. Over time, historians have realized that the British probably lost that battle because their advancing soldiers paused and became sitting ducks for American troops. However, immediately after the battle, the tale spread that Americans won the battle because sharp-shooting frontiersmen from Kentucky were able to pick off British troops with incredible accuracy. Americans were proud of the successes of their militia over professional British soldiers, and they chose to believe that the victory of the Battle of New Orleans was a victory for all Americans.
Does the passage above reflect NATIONALISM or SECTIONALISM? How do you know?


Example 2: Between 1819 and 1821, Congress plunged into a lengthy controversy over admitting Missouri to the Union as a slave state. Noting that every president since John Adams had been a Virginian, Federalists portrayed the admission of Missouri as a slave state as part of a plan to extend the rule of Virginian slave holders. Democratic Republicans pointed out the sudden emergence of a vocal anti-slavery group of representatives in the House of Representatives, who were mostly from northern states. The issue of slavery was building a general distrust between the political parties and between sections of the country.
Does the passage above reflect NATIONALISM or SECTIONALISM? How do you know?
Nationalism or Sectionalism?
Nationalism is the belief that stresses the national welfare ahead of sectional or regional concerns. It also states that leaders give top priority to national interests in foreign affairs.
Among the people of a country, nationalism means having a strong feeling of being a part of the nation and sharing the nation’s culture and heritage with the rests of the population. Nationalism often shows itself in the peoples’ patriotism, in their pride in the country and its heroes and leaders, and in loyalty to what the nation stands for.
Sectionalism is valuing the interests of your region over the interests of the nation as a whole.

Example 1: From the War of 1812, the Battle of New Orleans became a source of legends about American superiority. Over time, historians have realized that the British probably lost that battle because their advancing soldiers paused and became sitting ducks for American troops. However, immediately after the battle, the tale spread that Americans won the battle because sharp-shooting frontiersmen from Kentucky were able to pick off British troops with incredible accuracy. Americans were proud of the successes of their militia over professional British soldiers, and they chose to believe that the victory of the Battle of New Orleans was a victory for all Americans.
Does the passage above reflect NATIONALISM or SECTIONALISM? How do you know?


Example 2: Between 1819 and 1821, Congress plunged into a lengthy controversy over admitting Missouri to the Union as a slave state. Noting that every president since John Adams had been a Virginian, Federalists portrayed the admission of Missouri as a slave state as part of a plan to extend the rule of Virginian slave holders. Democratic Republicans pointed out the sudden emergence of a vocal anti-slavery group of representatives in the House of Representatives, who were mostly from northern states. The issue of slavery was building a general distrust between the political parties and between sections of the country.
Does the passage above reflect NATIONALISM or SECTIONALISM? How do you know?


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