Napoleon’s Greatest Gamble: The Invasion of Russia (1812) Campaigns of the Napoleonic Wars vol. I



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Examples of play – Combat (2)


Following the previous example of play, let’s see how the combat proceeds.
Davout has 4 Inf divs, 1 Cav div and 1 Arty. As these six (6) units comprise three (3) different types the attack value is 6 + 4 = ten (10). This value is not halved because this is Davout’s first attack and he did not force march [Rule 11.3.].
The attack value is reduced by three (-3) as the attack involves crossing a river; and, by a further one (-1) as Davout is attacking with artillery into a hex containing a fortified city, to give a modified attack value of six (6) [Rule 11.4]. This value is increased by Davout’s CR of three (3) [Rule 11.5] to give a value of nine (9) [10 – 4 + 3]
It is also increased by support from Ney [Rule 11.5].
Ney has four (4) undisrupted units, one of which is Arty. As he had to force march to join the battle, the value of these is halved to two (2) [Rule 11.2, bullet 3]. Moreover he is attacking across a river, which gives a further negative adjustment of minus two (-2). However, as a commander Ney’s presence contributes one (1) to the attack, giving an overall modifier of one (1) [Rule 11.5.]
The French player rolls 1xd6. The result is a 5, so the final attack value is 9 (Davout) + 1 (Ney) + 5 (die-roll) = 15 (fifteen).
Constantine has 2 Inf divs and 1 Cav div. As these three (3) units comprise two (2) different types the defense value is 3 + 2 = five (5). This value is not halved because this is Constantine’s first combat and he did not force march [Rule 11.6.]. It is increased by Constantine’s CR of one (1) [Rule 11.7] to give a value of six (6) [3 + 2 + 1]. It is also increased by support from Platov and Wittgenstein [Rule 11.7].
Platov has three (3) undisrupted units, but as he force marched to join the battle the value of these is halved, with fractions rounded down, to one (1) [Rule 11.2, bullet 3]. So Platov contributes two (2) to the defence value (1 for the units and 1 for his presence) [Rule 11.7].
Wittgenstein has one (1) unit with him (not halved), which means that he also contributes two (2) to the defence value (1 for the units and 1 for his presence) [Rule 11.7].
The Russian player rolls 1xd6. Unfortunately, he/she only manages to score a 2 so the final defence value is 6 (Constantine) + 2 (Platov) + 2 (Wittgenstein) + 2 (die-roll) = 12 (twelve).
The French player is the winner. The Russian player must allocate three “hits” (15 – 12) [Rule 11.14] to his/her units which participated [Rule 11.17] and, because the winning margin was three or more, Constantine’s stack must withdraw from Smolensk [Rule 11.12, bullet 1].

Note that depending upon how the hits are allocated, and the class of units involved, Constantine may suffer further casualties during the withdrawal [Rules 11.11 and 11.16].
The French player must allocate half that number of hits, with fractions rounded down (that is, 1), adjusted per Rule 11.15, to units which participated in the attack [11.17]. The undisrupted combat units in Davout’s stack may advance to occupy Smolensk [Rule 11.12, bullet 1].




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