Module specification template



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MODULE SPECIFICATION TEMPLATE


SECTION 1: MODULE SPECIFICATIONS

1. The title of the module: British History in the 19th Century: Politics, Society and Culture

2. The Department which will be responsible for management of the module: School of History

3. The Start Date of the Module: Academic year 2013/2014

4. The cohort of students (onwards) to which the module will be applicable: Stage 1 students, primarily single- and joint honours History, but also available as ‘wild module’

5. The number of students expected to take the module: c. 40-60

6. Modules to be withdrawn on the introduction of this proposed module and consultation with other relevant Departments and Faculties regarding the withdrawal: none

7. The level of the module (eg Certificate [C], Intermediate [I], Honours [H] or Postgraduate [M]): C

8. The number of credits which the module represents 15

Note: undergraduate full-time students take modules amounting to 120 credits per year and postgraduate full-time students take modules amounting to 180 credits per year for a Masters award

9. Which term(s) the module is to be taught in (or other teaching pattern): Spring term

10. Prerequisite and co-requisite modules: none

11. The programmes of study to which the module contributes: BA in History (single and joint honours), Visual History

12. The intended subject specific learning outcomes and, as appropriate, their relationship to programme learning outcomes:


  1. To introduce students to the main political and socio-cultural developments in the history of modern Britain between c. 1830 and 1900; and to provide students with the skills needed to understand evaluate, contextualise and communicate effectively their knowledge of history (School of History, BA Programmes 2002/2003, Learning Outcomes, A.1 and 5)

  2. To provide students with an opportunity to develop their intellectual interests in modern British history and their skills in researching historical subjects and in communicating their knowledge and ideas, both orally and in writing. (Learning Outcomes, A. 3, C.2 and D.1)

  3. To expose students to the disciplines of political, social and cultural history. (Learning Outcomes, B).

13. The intended generic learning outcomes and, as appropriate, their relationship to programme learning outcomes:

  1. Students will gain an understanding of modern British history in its international/European context, which should help to equip them to live and work in Continental Europe. (Programme Aims, 1 and 2)

  2. Students will be encouraged to consider critically relevant intellectual concepts as well as differences of opinion and interpretation both in the past and among historians, and they will also be encouraged to develop their ability to identify and solve problems (A.2 and B.1 and 2)

  3. The course will test problem solving skills and ability to work both independently and within groups. Students will engage in independent work, using library resources, and will practice and improve their skills in time management, historical research, organisation and analysis of material, oral presentations and essay-writing. (A.2, C.2, D.1, 3 and 5)

  4. Students will also engage in group work in seminars, in which they will be encouraged to interact effectively with others and to work co-operatively on group tasks. (D.1)

  5. Students will acquire the skill to communicate complex concepts effectively both orally and through written work. They will acquire the ability to further develop skills they have already gained, which will be of use to them in future study or occupations (B 1-4)

  6. To provide students with communication skills and to provide skills in IT (Transferable Skills 1, 3)

14. A synopsis of the curriculum:

This course examines the principal themes of the political, social and cultural history of Britain during the Victorian era (c. 1830 –1900). This period saw the building of one of the world’s greatest empires, the transformation of Britain from a rural society into the world’s first and leading industrial nation, and the development of a modern state and new forms of democratic participation. Throughout the course, ‘Britain’ is not confused with ‘England’; all the themes outlined above will be presented in the context of Britain as a whole.

With the significant exception of the Crimean War (1854–6) Britain was at peace with its European neighbours during the century covered by this course – in marked contrast with the experience of the previous century. This is not to deny the importance of colonial conflicts (Afghanistan, South Africa, the Sudan and, most spectacularly, the Boer Wars) or of the continuing role of military and naval questions in British politics. But just as warfare had provided a major impetus for economic and social change in the eighteenth century, its relative absence in the nineteenth century was of equal importance.

We shall examine the Industrial Revolution, including its implications for demography, for transport, for exports and for agriculture. We shall assess the political impact of industrialisation by raising the issue of the potential for revolution in the years before 1832, the emergence of `liberal Toryism’, the pressures for and the consequences of the first Reform Act of 1832 and the crisis over the repeal of the Corn Laws in 1845-6. Appreciating that religious allegiance, as well as nationality, region, class, occupation and dialect, played a crucial part in the formation of individual and collective identities, the course will consider the Catholic Emancipation issue (1828-29), the growth in numbers of most of the Protestant dissenting denominations and the response of the Church of England which, in 1850, was still the established church in England, Wales and Ireland (though not Scotland).

The Great Exhibition of 1851 and the religious census of that year will enable us to assess the nature and impact of change during the first 20 years of the course. We will then move on to examine the Crimean War and the ascendancy of Palmerston, the emergence of the Conservative and Liberal parties in the heyday of Gladstone and Disraeli, the development of later nineteenth-century imperialism and the campaigns for legislative reforms in factories and public health. The second half of the course takes up the broad theme of political participation, notable through the expansion of the parliamentary franchise in 1867 and 1884. It will also discuss the substantial expansion of trade union membership, especially with the growth of the `new unionism’ in the 1880s, before examining in depth the rise of the Labour party. Political issues which dominated the final years of the course included the questions of Irish Home Rule, the consequent divisions in the Liberal party, the so-called ‘rediscovery’ of, and public (and private) responses to, poverty.

15. Indicative Reading List:

Hugh Cunnningham, The challenge of democracy. Britain 1832-1918 (Pearson, 2001)

M. J. Daunton, Progress and poverty. An economic and social history of Britain 1700-1850 (OUP, 1995)

Eric J. Evans, The forging of the modern state. Early industrial Britain 1783-1870 (Longman, 1983)

K. Theodore Hoppen, The mid-Victorian generation 1846-1886 (Oxford, 1998)

Donald Read, England 1868-1914. The age of urban democracy (Longman, 1979)

W.D. Rubinstein, Britain’s century. A political and social history 1815-1905 (Arnold, 1998)

Donald Winch and Patrick O’Brien (eds.), The political economy of British historical experience 1688-1914 (OUP/British Academy, 2002)

16. Learning and Teaching Methods, including the nature and number of contact hours and the total study hours which will be expected of students, and how these relate to achievement of the intended learning outcomes:

The module will consist of weekly lectures (10) and fortnightly 1-hour seminars (Programme Learning Outcomes A2-3). Use will be made of literary, visual and material sources (Programme Learning Outcome A4). Selected primary documents will be examined critically in seminars (Programme Learning Outcomes A1, A2-3, A5, B1-3, C1-3 and D1-6). The total number of study hours expected of students will be ten per week.

17. Assessment methods and how these relate to testing achievement of the intended learning outcomes:

The module will be assessed by means of two pieces of coursework (80%) and oral contributions to the seminar (20%).

18. Implications for learning resources, including staff, library, IT and space:

The module will be taught by Dr Stefan Goebel and other modern British historians in the School (Dr Bowman, Prof. Connelly and Prof. Ditchfield). The Templeman Library is well-served in terms of secondary material, but will need to acquire the most recent secondary sources in the form of books. As regards IT sources the library is well served by high-quality internet sources, including electronic journals and the Times Digital Archive, all of which are accessible both on and off the campus.
19. A statement confirming that, as far as can be reasonably anticipated, the curriculum, learning and teaching methods and forms of assessment do not present any non-justifiable disadvantage to students with disabilities:
I confirm that, so far as can be reasonably anticipated, the curriculum, learning and teaching methods and forms of assessment do not present any non-justifiable disadvantage to students with disabilities.
If the module is part of a programme in an Associate College, please complete the following:

20. Associate College:

21. University Department (for cognate programmes) or Faculty (for non-cognate programmes) responsible for the programme:

SECTION 2: MODULE IS PART OF A PROGRAMME OF STUDY IN A UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT

Statement by the Director of Learning and Teaching: "I confirm I have been consulted on the above module proposal and have given advice on the correct procedures and required content of module proposals"

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Director of Learning and Teaching
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Print Name




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Date



Statement by the Head of Department: "I confirm that the Department has approved the introduction of the module and, where the module is proposed by Departmental staff, will be responsible for its resourcing"

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Head of Department
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Print Name



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Date




SECTION 3: MODULE IS PART OF A PROGRAMME IN AN ASSOCIATE COLLEGE

(Where the module is proposed by an Associate College)



Statement by the Nominated Officer of the College: "I confirm that the College has approved the introduction of the module and will be responsible for its resourcing"

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Nominated Responsible Officer of the Associate College

………………………………………………….

Print Name

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Post
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Associate College




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Date





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