Missionaries, details of all chapel missionaries



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115 She came to the Chapel by transfer from Penge on 24th October 1870, and lived at 140 Rose Street. Presumably she came to Edinburgh for study or training, because she returned to ‘Penge Tabernacle near London’ on 12th January 1873, and the Church register notes ‘Gone to China, 1877’.

116 He transferred into the Chapel from the Baptist Church in Peckham on 14th March 1880, in order to study in Edinburgh, and his address was given as Dr. Louis, George Square, (presumably the E.M.M.S.), with the comment that he was a Medical Missionary. His departure from the Chapel was given simply as ‘To Congo’. The Ter-Jubilee list describes him as an Associate Member.

117 She is not on the Chapel Roll of Honour. She was received into membership by baptism on 9 November 1879, along with Helen Brock, and their address was Buckingham Terrace Lane. Their parents were in Edinburgh in June 1883, because the elders called on them over a disciplinary matter involving Helen, postponed until ‘after the departure of her sister to China’. The elders reported back in October 1883. Elders’ Minutes, 3 June and 8 October 1883. The reason for dropping off the Chapel Roll is, in the case of Helen, ‘absent for a long time’, and in the case of Mary, ‘To China’. Her career has not been followed up here.

118 See ‘James Balfour’ on the CD..

119 See ‘Laura Gray’ on the CD.

120 See ‘Thomas Draper’ on the CD.

121 See ‘Jean Scott’ on the CD.

122 See ‘Eleanor Dovey’ on the CD.

123 See ‘Adam Scott’ on the CD.

124 Left the Chapel in 1913 (on her return in autumn 1921 it was said that she had ‘left us eight years ago for India to work among the Eurasian children at Kalimpong’ Record, 1921, p. 90. ? whether a missionary or whether had taken up employment without going through a missionary training?? Ter-Jubilee gives her termination date as 1918, but Record entry implies 1921.

125 Went to West Africa in 1914 with the Sudan Interior Mission. Not a member of Charlotte Chapel until 1944/5 furlough from Nigeria. First mention of him when he spoke in 1938, (Record, p. 159.) Home on furlough in July 1944 (description of cramped conditions on voyage). He spoke at the YPM in late 1944. In late October 1945 he suddenly got the opportunity of a berth for Nigeria and he only went; description of journey. Home, June 1949. (Record, 1945, pp. 10, 169; 1946, p. 93. 1947 p. 126; 1948, p. 190; 1949, pp. 60, 110; 1949, pp. 137, 170; 1950, pp.68, 105; 1951, p. 124; 1952, pp. 14, 47; Home for good, in May 1952 but undertaking service here (1952, pp. 66, 103, 121; 1953, p. 50, 81; 1954, pp. 122; 1955, p. 198. Ter-Jubilee pamphlet includes him as a Chapel missionary. Died, December 1963, (1964, p. 10). Wife, Caroline, is listed separately; father of Norman, also in missionary list.

126 Wife of Thomas Allan, mentioned as ‘recently associated with the Chapel’ in 1940, Record, p. 109; 1941, p. 281; 1943, p. 40. She was nee C.M.B. Colvin; qualification C.M.B. Home from Nigeria in 1937 to look after their children, while he continued there. That is termination date on Chapel Roll, although she was not (apparently) a member of C.C. until October 1945. (Record, 1945, pp. 10, 169, 182.) 1947 Record and Ter-Jubilee pamphlet includes her as a Chapel missionary. On the list of ‘missionaries from the Chapel who have retired from overseas service’ in 1973, 1975, 1980, but not financially supported. Mother of Norman Allan, also on missionary list. Died 20 March (?)1985.

127 S.R.N. Valedictory, 17 July 1919, held early, jointly with Douglas Robertson, in case they could sail but she did not get away until 8 December 1919; details of the farewell at the Caledonian Station; cost of passage was £50; decided as a child to go to China as a nurse, inspired by Hudson Taylor’s life; her detailed log of her journey across the Atlantic, Canada and the Pacific to Shanghai and the start of her work in the Nanning Hospital in Kwangsi is the fullest account of a missionary ‘passage’ anywhere in the Chapel archives; early furlough in 1923 because ill; wanted to return in 1923 but not on missionary list in 1924; then shown as ‘former Chapel missionary’. Record, 1919, pp. 100, 114-5, 169 1920, p.3; 1920, pp. 22-4, 58-60, 77-8, 107-9, 136-7; 1921, pp. 12, 54, 91; 1922, pp. 67, 93, 111; 1923, pp. 18, 32, 36, 50, 74, 78, 93; 1924, pp. 13, 88; 1926, p. 134.

128 North Africa Mission, Algeria, 1919. Reports at Record, 1920, pp. 3, 14; 1921, pp. 23, 91; 1922, p. 16; 1923, pp. 16, 58, 67, 72, furlough after four years; 1924, p. 24, back in North Africa, full description of work; 1925, pp. 44, 150, furlough; 1927, p. 25; 1928, p.13, new station in Algeria; 1929, p. 12; 1930, p. 27; 1931, p. 28; 1932, p. 97; 1933, pp. 12-3 (in Algeria); 1935, pp. 25, 62; 1936, p. 30; 1937, p. 161 (furlough in England, now returned). Not mentioned again; retired in 1939, worn out by ill-health after 20 years in Algeria. Ter-Jubilee pamphlet has her termination date as 1939.

129 Heard the call in Bible Class, fifteen years before his Valedictory, held on 17 July 1919, jointly with Nurse Cowie, in case they could sail. He left Edinburgh on 20 October, with a large send-off at the station, and arrived in China on 13 December 1919. Went to Yencheng, then in Shanghai for summer of 1923, but his wife, H. Evelyn, was not there, as she had son John, seven weeks old on 9 July 1923. Infant Katherine in 1926. His wife, whom he called ‘Anuei’ in 1928, was not a member, as so not a Chapel missionary, until April 1941, but from the beginning she wrote long letters for the Record. Furlough in Edinburgh from October 1927 to February 1929, but busy on deputation. Returned via Siberia as quicker than ship. Another daughter born in 1930. Record, 1919, pp. 100, 114-5, 164; 1920, pp. 60-1, 135-6; 1921, pp. 47-8, 53-4, 66-7, 91 (current address), 1922, p. 48; 1923, pp. 28, 76-7 (Shanghai); 1924, pp. 70-1; 1925, pp. 68-9, 136; 1926, pp. 103-5 (from both); 1926, p. 134; 1927, pp. 92, 94 (long letter), 150, 172, (home); 1928, 12-3, 148, 171, 188 (deputation), 1929, p. 60 (return to China); 1930, pp. 44 (daughter born), 59, 101; 1931, pp. 29, 60-1, 109; 1932, p. 97 (Chefoo); 1933, pp. 56, 61, 87 (three children well); 1934, pp. 74, 90-1 (at Chefoo); 1935, pp. 60, 88; 1936, pp. 71, 93, 154; 1937, pp. 81-2; 1938, pp. 81, 142-3; 1939, pp. 71, 111, 207 (furlough); 1940, pp. 30 (home, couldn’t get back because of war), 32, 45, 109; 1941, pp. 222, 253, 265; 1942, pp. 9, 28. Both on 1944 list. Sailed to China at short notice, Record, 1945, p. 109. He is not on the list of ‘Our Own Missionaries’ in the Record, 1947, p. 168. In Ter-Jubilee list, described as A.R.I.B.A. Died 18 March 1865 – no details given. Record, May 1965, p. 19.

130 In Ter-Jubilee leaflet, listed as a missionary for the same years as her husband, 1921–51, but not obvious from Record when she became a member or when she was regarded as a Chapel missionary. She was described as ‘one of the eight who, having already served as missionaries, have joined us and gone out from us during the first ten years of Sidlow Baxter’s pastorate.’ Maiden name, Evelyn Lachlan. Status, as far as the Chapel is concerned, was in 1945, not home-grown as a Chapel member, confirmed by Sidlow Baxter in Record, 1945, p. 173. She was home in Spring 1947 from China to see the children, who had stayed in this country. Mr. Baxter also met her in Philadelphia just before that. Record, 1947, p. 85. She is not on the list of ‘Our Own Missionaries’ in the Record, 1947, p. 168.

131 Was at Atholl Crescent when offered for missionary service in February 1920. (Record, 1920, p. 100) Valedictory 8 November 1920, left Waverley Station, Edinburgh, 12 November (Record, 1920, p. 180). Reports, Record, 1921, pp. 16, 91 (current address); 1922, p. 84; 1923, p. 32; 1924, pp. 58, 87, home after three and a half years to recuperate, not able to appear on platform; not allocated Chapel funds in October 1924 as she was in receipt of a good salary; Deacons’ Minute, 1 October 1924; Record, 1925, p. 46; still at home; 1926, p. 134, on ‘list of returned after years of service’ but not on ‘former missionary’ list; no further mention until 1929, when health allowed her to return to Church of Scotland mission in Kenya, valediction on 25 August 1929, after time (?working) in Shetland, Record, 1929, pp. 136, 154; reports, Record, 1930, pp. 13, 29, 88; 1931, pp. 59, 108; 1932, p. 61; 1933, p. 37 (four years in Kenya, to be home in autumn); June 1934 list as ‘furlough’; 1934, pp. 45, 70 (testimony); 1935, p. 75 (overseas); 1938, p. 71; 1939, pp. 71, 147 (furlough);.no further mention, not on 1944 list. Although she had retired by 1952, she went back to Kenya for one year in 1957, and finished (again) in 1959 (Record, 1957, pp. 139, 156; 1958, pp. 12, 108; 1959, p. 157) On Ter-Jubilee list as 1920–1952, 1957–8 (still there). At the Ter-Jubilee in 1958, she was described in the Conference brochure as: ‘Miss Lydia Garriock first went to Kenya in 1920 with the Church of Scotland. After many years’ work among women and children she retired in 1952, but set out again in 1957 to undertake the training of Christian social welfare workers for the Presbyterian Church of East Africa.’

132 She joined the Chapel in 1911, challenged during the Chapman-Alexander mission in 1914, qualified as a nurse, and was accepted by the Baptist Missionary Society in June 1920, to sail for China as soon as a passage could be arranged. She left Edinburgh on 26 November 1920. Regular reports, home on furlough from January 1926 to January 1927, during which she completed her training to become a fully-qualified nurse, which there had been no time to finalize before she first sailed. Record, 1920, pp. 115, 180; 1921, pp. 3, 16, 91 (current address); 1922, p. 61 (ill); 1923, pp. 36, 45, 61; 1925, p. 38; 1926, pp. 4, 25, 54 (home), 134; 1927, 6, 24 (farewell at station), 54. The Chapel then lost touch with her, when the Christmas 1927 gift and mail was not acknowledged, and asked the BMS about her. They said she had been at their mission hospital at Bhiwani, North India, until May 1928, and had then appeared in Calcutta on 30 May, on her way to Hong Kong to meet her fiancé, Mr. Young. He needed an operation, and she though that he should have it in England. When (and if) she married is not clear, but she resigned from BMS in or about October 1928. (Deacons’ file, 29 October 1928.) She was not on the Chapel on missionary lists in the Record in 1928, p. 148, nor 1929, p. 58, nor 1930. Her resignation from the Society in 1928 was her termination date on the Chapel Roll. She joined the Colonial Nursing Service in Hong Kong, where she served until the end of the war with Japan. She was highly regarded in the community. When the Japanese took Hong Kong, she was interned, but did a great deal to make conditions easier for others in the camp. She retired in 1946, and settled in her native Edinburgh, looking after students and sick people. Her indifferent health prevented her from attending the Chapel, but she did what she could to help. She died on 12th June 1965. Obituary in the Record, August 1965, p. 15.

133 Sister of Mrs. Theo Danson-Smith. She had trained in America, then went to Jerusalem in April 1920; her mother’s visit in 1923 is fully reported; furloughs in 1925 and 1928; she was sent by her Society for deputation in America from April to July 1929; she was re-validated on Sunday 29 September 1929 and her testimony is in the Record. Record, 1920, pp. 185-6; 1921, pp. 36, 91; 1922, p. 32; 1923, pp. 24, 36, 51, 67; 1924, p. 23; 1925, pp. 74, 104, 150; 1926, pp. 6-7; 1927, p. 59; 1928, pp. 62, 148, 189; 1929, pp. 6, 12, 68, 171; 1930, p. 43; 1931, pp. 74-5; 1932, p. 94; 1933, p. 39; 1934, pp. 44, 60-1, 118 (short furlough in Edinburgh); 1935, pp. 52-3; 1936, pp. 14, 75, 121 (furlough), 134; 1937, pp. 14-5, 107 (not go back because of death of sister); 1938, p. 14 (got parcel); 1940, 109 (described as ‘former missionary’), 152 (married Danson-Smith). Ter-Jubilee booklet in 1958 gives termination date as 1936.

134 He went to India in 1920, she in 1922; both joined the Chapel in 1944. ‘One of the eight who, having already served as missionaries, have joined us and gone out from us during the first ten years of Sidlow Baxter’s pastorate.’ Mentioned as ‘recently associated with the Chapel’ in Record, 1940, p. 109; 1941, p. 281; 1943, pp. 24, 41 (spoke in CC); 1944, p. 10; treated as CC missionaries in December 1943, both on 1944 list, with Edinburgh address. In Scotland, unable to return to India because of the war. Confirmed by Sidlow Baxter in Record, 1945, p. 173. In November 1944, they were suddenly offered a passage back to India, after over five years of ‘extended furlough’ in Great Britain due to the war. Because of war-time conditions, they left their sons, Andrew and George, here.Their status, as far as the Chapel is concerned, was in 1945, not home-grown as Chapel members but ‘having already served as a missionary, have joined us and gone out from us’. They were engaged in evangelistic work in the Orissa and Beharand districts until retiring in 1954. At Raxaul in March 1947, to relieve for the Bloks. Retired from India in 1954, having served 34 and 32 years respectively, and appointed as Scottish Secretary of RBMU. Reports in Record, 1945, pp. 9, 29, 61, 142, 173, 189; 1946, pp. 30, 45, 174; 1947, pp. 61, 155, 189; 1947, p. 48. Home in February 1949, Record, pp. 60, 92, 105. Returned in January 1950, reports in Record, 1950, pp. 27, 29, 78; 1951, pp 45, 110; 1952, pp. 15, 32, 122, 126, 174; 1953, p. 161; 1954, pp. 42, 60, 74; 1954, pp. 21, 92, 189.1953 Record and Ter-Jubilee booklet in 1958 gives their starting date as 1920 for him, 1922 for her, wife is still ‘active’ in 1953 list, but not in 1958. Resigned from mission in 1958.He died in September 1960, obituary in Record, 1960, p. 173.

135 See George McCabe. Wife not (originally) a member, but she was on the financial support list, quarter- support (i.e., £50 personal and £50 to the Society every quarter) in 1980. She too was ‘one of the eight who, having already served as missionaries, have joined us and gone out from us during the first ten years of Sidlow Baxter’s pastorate.’ On the list of ‘missionaries from the Chapel who have retired from overseas service’ in 1973, 1975, 1980, supported

136 See ‘Annie Wighton’ on the CD.

137 He was in the Army for the duration of the Great War, three years of it in the Black Watch, during which he was converted and he was baptised in Greece. He returned home full of missionary zeal, and went to the Bible Training Institute in Glasgow and then to Nigeria as a missionary in 1922. After a term there, he returned to the United Kingdom and offered his services to the Baptist Missionary Society. They accepted him for the Congo, but asked him to take some further training. He had a student-pastorate in Norfolk, then went to Spurgeon’s College in 1925. When he completed his studies there, the BMS had no funds to send him to Africa. There was, however, an opportunity to go to Jamaica, so he went there as soon as funds were available; valedictory in October 1926, and testimony; married Ethel in 1927. She was a Chapel missionary in 1933 - ? when came on list. Record, 1925, 136 (Spurgeon’s); 1926, pp. 134, 169 (valedictory and testimony), 181; 1927, pp. 26, 165 (marriage); 1928, p. 94; 1929, pp. 29, 76-7; 1930, pp. 89 (furlough, baby girl Muriel), 101, 154, 171 (returned October 1930); 1931, pp. 10, 141 (what he does); 1932, pp. 123-4 (another daughter, Dorothy Isobel); asked his younger brother, Alexander, to come to help him. See Alexander McNaughton. Reports, 1933, pp. 40, 125, furlough in August 1933 to be in Surrey. To the Burton Latimer Baptist Church, April 1938 to 1958. (? where is it) (Record, 1938, p. 57; 1939, p. 131, 212 (Columbia); 1940, pp. 45, 90 (son), 110,159. Ter-Jubilee pamphlet in 1958 gives him as Nigeria / Jamaica, 1922 – 1938 and his wife in the as same countries, 1924–38; query whether she was in Nigeria, as pamphlet states. Died, 15 October 1993.

138 See Angus McNaughton.

139 M.B., Ch.B., D.T.M., member for ten years, trained to be a missionary but called in 1923 to the Malta Seaman’s’ Protestant Hospital. Record, 1923, p. 3; 1924, p. 11; 1928, p. 118. Listed in the 1958 Ter-jubilee pamphlet as a Chapel missionary, 1923-1932.

140 Sister of Dr. James Milne; member for five years when went to Malta. All other references in conjunction with James Milne; also listed in the 1958 Ter-jubilee pamphlet as a Chapel missionary, 1923-1932.

141 See ‘Mary Mein Harrison’ on the CD.

142 Graduate of Edinburgh medical school, testimony at valedictory, reports as below; by 1931 feeling called to home work. Record, 1923, pp. 72, 78 (valedictory), 86 (testimony); 1924, pp. 23-4; 1925, p. 53; 1926, pp. 25-6; 1927, pp. 44, 134 (furlough); 1928, pp. 29, 149; 1929, pp. 12, 136 (return to Egypt in August 1929 after furlough); 1930, pp. 43-4, 101; 1931, p. 29. Ter-Jubilee booklet in 1958 gives her termination date as 1930.

143 Baptized and joined the Chapel in 1918. There is mention of her being in Belgian Congo in 1923, but that does not feature in her testimony at her valediction on Sunday morning, 8 February 1925, when she intended to work with the Church of Scotland mission in Blantyre, Nyassaland. She started there, but on 22 January 1926 was sent to fill a gap at another station, at Alto Moloure, Quelimane, Portuguese East Africa, and she spent the whole of her first term there; furlough in June 1929, went to work with Fisher Girls in North, at home until 6 March 1930; further testimony on the Sunday before she sailed. Record, 1925, p. 37 (valediction and testimony); 1926, pp. 57, 92; 1927, pp. 109, 157; 1929, pp. 76, (furlough), 149 (Fisher Girls); 1930, pp. 11, 22 (leave), 58 (testimony); 1932, pp. 109-10; 1933 list has her in Blantyre, Nyassaland; 1934, pp. 61, 91, 166; then home on furlough in order to nurse her parents - both June and December 1934 lists; 1935, pp. 27, 36 (not going back; she took various nursing posts in this country); not on 12/36 list; finished in 1935 through domestic circumstances. Ter-Jubilee booklet gives her date of termination as 1934. Assistant Matron of Bruntsfield Hospital, Edinburgh, for several years before retirement in 1959. (Record, 1960, p. 41.) Died in March 1971 (Record, April 1971).

144 Joined the Chapel in 1919. S.R.N., S.C.M. Completed General Nurses training in Sunderland in 1924, then to Glasgow, valedicted Sunday morning 8 February 1925, to work with children in India (but went to Livingstonia). Testimony – one of those who offered to fill the places of the men killed in the Great War. Breakdown in health in 1927, returned permanently to Edinburgh and faithful at Ladies Prayer Meeting. Never lost her interest in the Chapel but ? how long a member. Married Davidson. With crippling arthritis of the spine, she and her daughter Marjory (husband not mentioned) moved to Southsea to warmer climate and also to be nearer her son William. Died July 1966. Record, 1924, p. 74; 1925, p. 37; 1926, pp. 56, 105; 1927, pp. 60, 148, 150. Obituary in Record, August 1966, p. 13;

145 See Andrew G. W. MacBeath on CD; also in

146 See Andrew G. W. MacBeath on CD.

147 M.B., Ch. B., D.T.M.& H. Son of John Edward Dovey; qualified as doctor in June 1924, married a doctor in 1924 (Congregationalist from Sheffield), accepted by London Missionary Society for Hong Kong, gave his testimony at Valediction in the Chapel for himself and his wife in 1925, to Shanghai hospital 1925, son died there in September, due home in March 1927 but took up a Colonial appointment in Hong Kong in May 1927, so no longer on missionary list; wife Lilias (not Chapel member) home for health, in Chapel in November 1927 with daughter of ten weeks before sailing in October for China. Record, 1924, pp. 58, 83; 1925, pp. 5, 22-3, 72; 1926, pp. 25-6, 54, 56, 151; 1927, pp. 26, 44, 85, 157, 181.

148 Converted at the age of ten in Charlotte Chapel, called to this Mission in April 1923 through the Y.P.M., member of the Women’s Missionary Auxiliary; went to the Bible Training Institute, Glasgow in 1924 for two years, hoping to go to Morocco; reports from B.T.I; valediction and testimony, left Caledonian Station on 18 November 1926, with singing of Psalm 23, Deacons’ Minute 7 January 1925; Record, 1924, p. 75; 1925, p. 74; 1926, pp. 68, 169, 181; reports from Morocco, Record, 1927, pp. 85, 92; 1928, pp. 28-9, 118; 1929, p. 44; 1930, pp. 27, 101; home in May 1931, deputation, Record, 1931, pp. 28, 93, 107, 168; Left 3 December 1931 for another five years, farewell at station, Record, 1932, p. 12; 1934, p. 45, 118, 155-7, 184 (at home, February 1934, not on June list but returned to Morocco in September, so back on December list); 1935, p. 9; 1936, pp. 14, 48 (Edinburgh), 72, not on December 1936 list. Ter-Jubilee booklet confirms 1936. Came home to care for her elderly mother. Went back on a visit, Record, 1954, p. 10. Active in the Chapel on her return to Edinburgh until illness curtailed her activity. She died in Edinburgh on 6 July 1989, in her early 90s. Obituary in the Record, November 1989, p. 3.

149 Trained, 1926, at London headquarters of the China Inland Mission, but resigned on ‘extremely unfortunate’ grounds and went instead to Egypt with the Egypt General Mission in 1927. Brought up as an Anglican, but baptised in Charlotte Chapel. Record, 1926, p. 134 (training); 1927, p. 135 (valedictory, Sunday evening, 31 July 1927, testimony); 1928, pp. 43-4. Elders’ Minute, 26 January 1927. Then not on October 1928 missionary list, nor 1929 nor 1930. . Ter-Jubilee booklet in 1958 gives her termination date as 1928.

150 Eldest daughter of Mr Tait, an office-bearer in the Chapel. She was converted early in life and was baptized at a children’s baptismal service during Dr Scroggie’s ministry. Trained as a doctor at the University of Edinburgh, M.B., Ch.B., valedictory and testimony, Sunday evening 31 July 1927, father now an elder, farewell at station. Reports from Damascus; came home for a time and married Dr. Emrys Thomas in the Chapel on 1 September 1931, went with him to Nazareth. (Record, 1926, p. 134; 1927, pp. 118, 135-6 (valedictory), 148 (farewell); 1928, p. 28; 1930, pp. 89-90, 101; 1931, pp. 12-3, 93, 95-6, 149; 1933, p. 38, (Jerusalem for language study, soon to go to Damascus); 1934, p. 106; 1935, pp. 26, 27-8, 135; 1936, pp. 15, 72 (return), 109; 1937, p. 61 1939, p. 71; 1939, pp. 32, 69, 165 (home for mother’s illness); 1940, pp. 45, 109; 1942, pp. 61, 135; 1943, p. 105.) In 1941, she couldn’t get permission to return although he went back in July 1941 as a key worker; she returned early 1943. Both on 1944 list, although he was not a member. Reports from Nazareth, then Damascus, (Record, 1945, pp. 42, 61, 110). Spoke in the Chapel in December 1946. (Record, 1947, pp. 22, 61, 105 (both in Chapel); 125 (full report), 173.) In 1947 Record list, but her husband is not included, as he was not a member, nor in the Christmas mail for 1956 (she only). In a 1957 list, both are named but only she has an asterisk as ‘our own missionary’; (Record, 1957, p. 28). For other entries, see note on her husband, Emrys Thomas, next entry. At the Ter-Jubilee in 1958, they were described in the Conference brochure as: ‘Dr and Mrs Dr E. Thomas have been at the E.M.M.S. Victoria Hospital, Damascus, since 1927. They have seen many changes, politically and socially, and not a few changed lives.’ In 1964 list, at Molepolele (both of them listed – see his entry for details). On the list of ‘missionaries from the Chapel who have retired from overseas service’ in 1973 and 1975, still supported, but he was not mentioned. She died in 1975 and her obituary is in the Record, January 1976, pp. 8-9. .

151 Emrys was born in Arthog, near Barmouth, in 1905; he qualified in medicine in Edinburgh in 1929. After qualifying, he had to learn Arabic before going to Nazareth and then to Damascus to work. He married Dr Margaret (‘Peggy’) Tait in the Chapel soon after qualifying, and she joined in his work both in Damascus and Botswana as obstetrician and gynaecologist. He had an adventurous time during the Second World War, having to flee from Damascus disguised as an Arab when the Vichy French took over the city. On returning to Damascus in 1945, he kept the hospital open when the city was shelled. For this achievement he became, he said, what he always thought he had been, a Member of the British Empire. This was later upgraded to an OBE. For work prior to 1944, see entries for his wife, Margaret Tait. He appeared on the 1944 missionary list, and then, when he was awarded an MBE in January 1946, for medical services during the war, he was described as ‘one of our own missionaries’. However, he is not on the lists of ‘Our Own Missionaries’ in the Record, 1947, p. 168, 1953, p. 11. Reports appear about his movements in the Record, 1946, pp. 24, 45; 1947, pp. 22, 30; 1948, pp. 14 (home), 25 (return to Damascus), 57, 87 (he transferred to Nazareth, no communication possible), 109 (her report); 1949, p. 110. Both at Damascus, (Record, 1950, pp. 14, 36, 110; 1951, pp. 29, 60, 76 (home briefly), 94, 110; 1952, p. 62; 1953, p. 32, 109 (OBE in addition to existing MBE); 1953, p. 130; 1954, pp. 54 (home), 92, 137; 1955, pp. 58, 123, 155; 1956, pp. 126, 185; 1957, pp. 13, 141 (photo). In a 1957 list, both are named but only she has an asterisk as ‘our own missionary’; (Record, 1957, p. 28.) At the Ter-Jubilee in 1958, he was described in the Conference brochure as: ‘Dr and Mrs Dr E. Thomas have been at the E.M.M.S. Victoria Hospital, Damascus, since 1927. They have seen many changes, politically and socially, and not a few changed lives.’ Further reports in the Record, 1958, pp. 29 (Damascus closed), 61, 141; 1959, pp. 110, 124, 156 (home in October); 1960, pp. 123, 158, 172. After nearly 30 years' service in Damascus with the EMMS, in 1959, when they were prevented from remaining in Syria, they were seconded by the EMMS to the United­ Free Church of Scotland Mission Hospital in Molepolole, Botswana (? Bechuanaland) (she was supported by the Chapel, he was not), where they served in the mission hospital until retirement. They sailed in November 1960; (Record, 1960, p. 158; 1961, pp. 45, 62, 141; 1962, pp. 29, 82, 126, 141, 190; 1963, p. 141; 1964, April, p. 23, May, p. 21, August, p. 21; 1965, February, March and October; 1966, March and July; 1968, February, p. 23, July, p. 23, September, p, 22, November, p. 21; 1969, February, p. 22, June, p. 22 (home). Retired to Edinburgh in May 1969, where, sadly, Peggy died in 1975. Emrys continued to live in Edinburgh, supported by a host of friends, and he maintained his interest in life to the end. He remained fluent in Welsh and would often surprise visitors from the Middle East by addressing them in Arabic. He worshipped regularly at Charlotte Chapel where he had married more than 60 years before. 90th birthday on 25 June 1995. He died in Edinburgh on 19 March 2002, and his funeral service was held in the Chapel. He was survived by his younger brother, Dr Alun Thomas, of Vancouver, Canada. Obituary: ‘Former medical missionary with the Edinburgh Medical Missionary Society, serving in Damascus 1934-59 and Botswana 1960-70.’

152 Paul and Mrs Maida Contento, BA and MA respectively. She was brought up in the Chapel by Chapel members, Mr and Mrs George Bolster and was always financially supported by the Chapel; Paul was an American and was never a member. They were members of the Overseas Missionary Fellowship (formerly China Inland Mission) from 1928. She graduated MA in 1924, in training, London HQ, CIM, 1926; valedictory, Sunday 25 December 1928, and testimony; left 31 December. Originally she worked in China among University students, see section ‘Maida Contento’ on the CD. (Reports. Record, 1924, p. 58; 1926, p. 134; 1928, pp. 23, 53; 1929, pp. 13, 60; 1930, pp. 90-1; 1931 pp.61, 93; 1932, p. 95; 1933, pp. 56, 119 (married Paul Contento in China, 10 June 1933, he was never a member of the Chapel and so never received financial support); 1934, p. 119 (called Mary here and elsewhere); 1935, pp. 74-5; 1936, pp. 58, 71, 91-2, 172, 198; 1937, p. 15; 1938, pp. 44, 59; 1939, p. 128, 171; 1940, pp. 45, 185 (daughter), nothing else because of war until 1944, p. 186.) On 1944 list, with husband; although he was not a member, he was referred to as one of ‘our own’ missionaries in China when he was seriously ill in 1945. (Record, 1945, p. 10.) She came home in August 1946, after 9 years, he went to USA, she joined him there, and met Mr Baxter, and then on to China, March 1947. (Record, 1946, pp. 78, 136, 141, 154, 183; 1947, pp. 11, 42; 1948, pp. 109, 157, 190; 1949, pp. 59 126, 169-170.). He was in the USA until October 1949, and when he returned to China he could have no communication with his wife because she had returned to Sian, China, while he was away, and he went to a different part and there was no link between them; he had still not communicated with his wife and daughter by 1950. (Record, 1950, pp, 14, 25, 68, 136.) They got together in November1950 (Record, 1951, pp. 28, 73-4). They were then in Hong Kong and went to Singapore in 1952 (Record, 1951, p. 124; 1952, pp. 31, 34; 1953, p. 81.) At the Ter-Jubilee in 1958, they were described in the Conference brochure as: ‘The Rev. Paul Contento, B A., with his wife, Maida (nee Bolster), M.A., have been with the CIM, OMF, since 1928. Originally in China working among University students, they are now in Singapore doing similar work. Both at Nanyang University and at Singapore Theological Seminary, there are tremendous opportunities for strategic Christian training.’ (Record, 1956, p. 13; 1957, p. 125; 1958, pp. 45, 146, 158; 1959, p. 126; 1960, pp. 29, 78, 110, 140, 189; 1961, pp. 30, 62, 110, 157, 190; 1962, pp. 13, 34, 94, 126, 174; 1963, pp. 14, 93, 157; 1964, March p. 22, May, p. 21, August, p. 21, September, p. 21; 1965, May, p. 22, June, p. 22, October, p. 22, November, p. 22; 1966, March, p. 22, May, p. 23, November, p. 21; 1967, February, p. 23, April, p. 22, June, p. 21, November, p. 21.) In the 1964 list, both of them were in Saigon, Vietnam. The next letters noted are from Saigon in 1968, March p. 23, May p.22, October, p. 21. In 1969 they were seconded to the International Fellowship of Evangelical Students to evangelise and train University and High School students in Vietnam. (Record, 1969, February, p. 22, May, p. 22, July, p.15, November, p.22; 1970, June; 1971, February, August, September, 1972, he was aged 65 in May but wanted to stay in Saigon; Record, September;1973, May, October, December; still in Saigon, two letters in 1974 Record; . Their one daughter, Isobel, married and lived in America – details on the CD section ‘Maida Contento’. Events at the beginning of 1975 compelled them to leave Vietnam, and they worked in the Bible Seminary of the Philippines and also helped to develop youth leadership in the Chinese Churches.(Five letters in the Record, 1975, five in 1976, five in 1977, four in 1978, four in 1979, two in 1980, and then letters right through to 1986.) In California, letters in 1987 and 1988. They retired in 1982 and worked with Chinese students in California. She was still on the financial support list, fully supported (i.e., £50 personal and £200 to the Society every quarter) in 1980. She died in California on 14 November 1985, after lecturing to students. Obituary in the Record, January 1986, p. 5. Her husband’s obituary of her is at ‘Maida Contento’ on the CD. A copy of Paul Contento’s autobiography, A Maverick Missionary on Asian Campuses (Shangkuan Press, Philippines, 1993) is in the Chapel archives under 1993. Report about his retirement activities, Record, March 1993, p. 9. He died on 1 August 1997, two weeks short of his 92nd birthday.

153 Rev. Gerald and Mrs Mar­garet Block, both financially supported by the Chapel, were with the RBMU in India for 34 years, latterly in leprosy work at Muzatfarpur. On returning home, they assisted in deputation work, especially in the East of Scotland and the Borders. Trained at the Bible Training Institute, Glasgow, 1926-8, she kept saying that she would go with the Regions Beyond Missionary Union, but her destination was in fact the Behar and Orissa Mission in September 1928 (there may have been some link between them). On 2 April 1931 she married Gerald J. Blok (later Block), who had gone to India in 1930. Baby, Margaret Ruth, died and she herself was very ill, Chapel funded passage home, arrived London on 4 November 1932, Record, 1926, p. 134 (training); 1928, pp. 118, 167-8 (valedictory); 1929, pp. 28-9, 77; 1930, pp. 44-5, 101, 157; 1931, pp. 73-4, 86 (marriage); 1932, pp. 96-7, 140, 170; 1933, pp. 37-8, 151 (on furlough, spoke on Missionary Sunday), 152 (returning to field); 1934, pp. 37, 89, 103, 184 (furlough); 1935, pp. 26, 52, 117, 132, 147 (return, Mr. Blok gave his testimony, converted in India in 1924), 149; 1936, pp. 75-6, 91; 1937, p. 30, 1938, pp. 60, 128; 1939, pp. 12, 50, 111, 147 (furlough); 1940, pp. 10 (return), 14, 152 (Geraldine born); 1942, pp. 11, 78, 174; 1943, pp. 25, 78; 1944, p. 45; 1945, pp. 42 (voyage home), 56 (in Edinburgh), 71, 121 (in Holland). On 1944 list, with husband, although he was not a member; likewise in Ter-Jubliee brochure in 1958, where the spelling ‘Block’ is used. For travels from 1945 on, see notes on husband. Entries in the Record between 1949 and 1971 listed in her husband’s entry. At the Ter-Jubilee in 1958, they were described in the Conference brochure as: ‘Rev. and Mrs Gerald Block (new spelling) have been with the RBMU in India for 30 years. Their most recent and dramatic advance has been in leprosy work at Muzaffarpur. With hundreds under their care, they have seen many respond to the love of Christ.’ In 1964 list, with her husband. On the list of ‘missionaries from the Chapel who have retired from overseas service’ in 1973, 1975, 1980, supported. On the financial support list, half- support (i.e., £50 personal and £100 to the Society every quarter) in 1980. She died in Edinburgh on 25 August 1985.

154 Sometimes called Vonda, sometimes called Melville. Parents had been missionaries in Arabia, felt called, two years in Faith Mission, 1924-6, studied medicine 1926-8, valedictory and testimony, 8 July 1928 at Sunday evening service, reports in Record, 1928, pp. 115-7; 1929, pp. 28, 61, 125; 1930, pp. 45, 61, 68, 88, 101; 1931, pp. 73, 133-4; 1933, pp. 37 (had been in Edinburgh for five months, now to Northern Ireland on deputation, to go to Belgium in March 1933 for four months to do Diploma in Tropical Medicine, needed for medical work in Congo), 118 (passed), 151 (spoke on Missionary Sunday); 1934, pp. 45 (medical study and deputation), 103 (sailed for Congo, 12/7/34); 1935, pp. 46, 52; 1936, pp. 30, 76, 80, 172; 1937, p. 81; 1938, p. 60; 1939, p. 111, 147 (furlough, June 1939), 231; 1940, pp. 32, 109; 1941, p. 11. In Bristol in December 1941, never went back, not on 1944 list. Ter-Jubilee brochure gives termination date as 1939.

155 Brother of Alison Ballantyne. In training at B.T.I., received grant from the Memorial Training Fund some time after 1927; valediction by Graham Scroggie and testimony, 29 September 1929, sailed October, reports, home April 1932; re-valediction, 19 February 1933, report and appeal. Record, 1929, pp. 136, 140, 154, 171; 1930, p. 26; 1931, pp. 29, 92, 93; 1932, pp. 77, 78, 170, 172; 1933, p. 42; 1934, pp. 73, 134; 1935, pp. 46, 58 (furlough), 60, 84, 117, 132, 144, 147; 1936, pp. 14, 71 (return); 1937, pp. 82, 161; 1938, pp. 78-9, 141-2, 159 (home), 173; 1939, pp. 50, 65 (home), 107-8, 147 (back in Sudan); 1940, pp. 14 (return), 110, 121, 135 (married Margaret on field); 1942, p. 78; 1943, pp. 94 (home), 105. On 1944 list, wife also on list but not member and not CC missionary. Left S.U.M., at home and not sure of next step – Record, 1945, p. 45. Ter-Jubilee brochure gives termination date as 1944. However, he visited the Chapel in 1949 (Record, 1949, p. 29) and in 1989 it is said that he spent 33 years overseas, which is 1962, mentioning a recent visit to West Africa – Record, September 1989, p. 8.

156 Medical missionary student, born to missionary parents in the New Hebrides, with E.M.M.S. from 1925, went to help at Nazareth in 1929, aged 21, as a fourth-year student for practical training, taken ill three months later, died 17 August 1929, buried in hospital there. Record, 1929, pp. 154, 183-4.

157 Rev. Gerald and Mrs Mar­garet Block, both financially supported by the Chapel, were with the RBMU in India for 34 years, latterly in leprosy work at Muzatfarpur. On returning home, they assisted in deputation work, especially in the East of Scotland and the Borders. Went to India in 1939 (1953 list says 1930). On 1944 list, as husband of Margaret Myles, although he was not a member; likewise in Ter-Jubliee brochure in 1958, where the spelling ‘Block’ is used. Qualification, MTC. His status in 1945, as far as the Chapel is concerned, was ‘One of the eight who, having already served as missionaries, have joined us and gone out from us during the first ten years of Sidlow Baxter’s pastorate.’ He joined in 1947. He spoke at the members’ meeting on 30 May 1949. Report in 1945 that he had had a holiday with the family in Darjeeling, had left them there, and wife and Geraldine would join him later in Raxaul; Elizabeth to stay in Darjeeling for school but would join the family for the holidays; in Edinburgh, February 1947. Record, 1945, pp. 13, 45, 173; 1946, 29, 77-8, 186; 1947, pp. 42 (voyage home), 56 (in Edinburgh), 71, 121 (in Holland, visiting his family). On list for 1947 Record, at home. On furlough in Edinburgh with the family in December 1947, expecting to be here for some time. Record, 1948, pp. 29, 103, 1949, pp. 60, 174. Name spelt as Block from 1949. Reports in the Record 1950, pp. 29, 110; 1951, pp. 13, 45; 1951, pp. 60, 94; 1952, pp. 14, 46, 94, 174; 1953, pp. 49, 130; 1954, p. 27; 1955, pp. 10, 155; 1956, pp. 13, 126; 1957, pp. 14, 45, 61, 73, 138 (home); 1957, p. 142; 1958, pp. 61, 109 (return), 158 (sail). At the Ter-Jubilee in 1958, they were described in the Conference brochure as: ‘Rev. and Mrs Gerald Block (new spelling) have been with the RBMU in India for 30 years. Their most recent and dramatic advance has been in leprosy work at Muzaffarpur. With hundreds under their care, they have seen many respond to the love of Christ.’ Further reports in Record, 1959, p. 11; 1960, pp. 94, 109, 189; 1961, pp. 29, 138 (children qualify), he in India, she to join him; 1961, p. 173; 1962, pp. 62, 94, 157; 1963, pp, 29, 61, 79, 93, 173; April 1964, p. 21, June 1964, p. 22 (furlough). In 1964 list, with his wife. Record, February 1965, p. 21, April, p. 21, October, p. 21; November 1966, p. 21, to undertake deputation permanently at home. Retired from the mission in good standing in 1967 – Deacons’ Minute, 1 February 1967. Three years deputation, Record, April 1967, p, 22. On the list of ‘missionaries from the Chapel who have retired from overseas service’ in 1973, 1975, 1980, supported. On the financial support list, half-support (i.e., £50 personal and £100 to the Society every quarter) in 1980. Letter in Record, April 1971; daughter married in Canada in 1972. Died 9 August 1991; obituary, Record, November 1991, p. 3.

158 Member from 1925, while medical training at University, went in January 1930 with his young bride to take charge of Tanna Hospital, New Hebrides. Letter published but not on missionary list. Record, 1930, pp. 23, 181 (arrived); 1931, p. 123; 1932, p.13, is on missionary list in 1934, p. 185. Reference to him in 1934, p. 53; 1935, pp. 26, 108; 1936, pp. 30, 109, 172 (furlough, family live in Glasgow), 1937, pp. 23, 41, 61. Ter-Jubilee brochure gives termination date as 1937. Qualifications, M.B., Ch.B., D.P.H. In 1980 Dan and Mary, living in Kilmarnock, celebrated their golden wedding, Record, February 1980, p. 4.

159 Converted in Charlotte Chapel at the age of ten, at a Sunday School Decision Day, trained with Edinburgh Medical Missionary Society, valedictory at evening service in Chapel, 19 April 1931, full testimony and details of expected work, Record, 1931, pp. 87-8. Letter from him and his wife, L.M., language study, school and medical work, Record, 1932, p. 124; 1935, p. 61; 1936, pp. 15, 35, 71, 153 (furlough); not on 12/36 list. Ter-Jubilee brochure gives him still on Missionary Roll of Honour as continuing in 1958, but now in South Africa, and he is not described as a ‘Present Member’. May have ceased membership in 1936. At September 1958 he was in membership elsewhere.

160 He (only) is mentioned as ‘recently associated with the Chapel’ in Record, 1940, p. 109 and a member by 1942, p. 73, linked with the China Inland Mission. Status, as far as the Chapel is concerned, was in 1945, not home-grown as a Chapel member but ‘one of the eight who, having already served as missionaries, have joined us and gone out from us during the first ten years of Sidlow Baxter’s pastorate.’ Confirmed by Sidlow Baxter in Record, 1945, p. 173. In the Ter-Jubilee booklet in 1958, he is not a ‘Present Member’ but is listed in the Missionary Roll of Honour as having gone to China in 1931 and still there. However, his obituary (Record, July 1991, p. 3) says he was ‘a former Chapel missionary to China (1942-66)’. The opening date presumably means when he first went as a Chapel member, not his first time in China. They were both in Edinburgh in the summer of 1942 (the first reference which the writer has picked to her) and although they were accredited to C.I.M, they were valedicted from the Chapel on the Sunday morning before he went as Red Cross workers, not as missionaries. Was this in order to get them travel permits? They sailed for China in the summer of 1942, but their departure was fairly low-key – no valedictory service, just a farewell word from the pulpit. Nevertheless, their letters were printed along with others ‘From Our Own Missionaries’. Mr Ward then visited the Chapel briefly for two Sundays in August 1945 as ‘one of our own missionaries working with a Red Cross team in China’. He was on a short visit to Britain by ‘plane, and hoped to complete his Red Cross work within a year, and, after a short period, to return to his mission work in China with Mrs Ward. She was with UNRRA on the same basis as he was with the Red Cross. They went back to Shanghai, leaving the children (apparently young) in Bournemouth until they could join them for school in China. In 1947, he was ‘one of our missionaries who has been working during the war under the auspices of the Red Cross Society, [now] appointed Secretary and Treasurer for the whole of China of the Methodist Mission at Shanghai.’ Mrs Ward was to return to this country for furlough and might take the children back with her. Record, 1942, pp. 73, 90, 157; 1944, pp. 58-9; 1945, pp. 158, 189-90; 1947, p. 39. He was not on the 1944 list of missionaries in the Record. He is not on the list of ‘Our Own Missionaries’ in the Record, 1947, p. 168. He remained in membership and was described in the 1960s by the Missionary Committee as ‘late of CIM, now in government service in Malaya’ and he and his wife had been seen in the Chapel recently. He died in Australia on 3 June 1991 (reference to obituary, above.)

161 Younger brother of Rev. Angus McNaughton, BMS missionary in Jamaica, who asked Alexander to come to Jamaica in 1932 at his expense, because the local churches could not maintain one missionary, let alone two. Farewell from Charlotte Chapel and testimony on Sunday morning, 17 July 1932, when he acknowledged that he had no training. To All Nations College, 1933, sailed to Bolivia with WEC in January 1936, then in Columbia. (Record, 1932, pp. 123, 125, 140-1; 1933, pp. 40, 185 (College)); ‘One of the eleven of our younger people who have gone out into full-time Christian service during the first ten years of Sidlow Baxter’s pastorate.’ Sidlow Baxter’s review of 1935-45, Record, 1945, pp. 165–6, 173 – (? whether accurate report as he first went in 1932.) 1936, pp. 57 (testimony), 127; 1937, pp. 46, 96, 127, 194; 1938, pp. 14, 128; 1939, pp. 131, 212; 1940, pp. 45, 90 (son), 110, 159; 1941, p. 253; 1942, p. 189; 1943, p. 141; 1944, p. 141. Otherwise described as ‘Heart of Andes Mission, 1936-1945. Both on 1944 list. Furlough in 1944 after nine years, left Columbia in December 1944, started trip by plane, to USA to await ship, arrived Edinburgh in September 1945. Confirmed by Sidlow Baxter in Record, 1945, p. 173. Obtained a year’s extension of furlough, decided in October 1946 not to return but to seek service in U.K. (Record, 1945, pp. 29, 61, 154; 1946, pp. 29, 174.) Seriously ill in Edinburgh Royal Infirmary, Record, January 1948, better in Record, 1948, pp 29, 47, not able to return, 1952, p. 178. Wife gave talk on his behalf, 1958, p. 76. The Ter-Jubilee booklet in 1958 includes them both in the Missionary Roll of Honour, he as Jamaica, Colombia, South America from 1932 (not 1935), with a termination date of 1945. Cross-check with Jessie McNaughton, below, who appears to be his wife and whose story is on the CD.

162 Chapel member, sister of James Ballantyne, went to London for training, home for Christmas 1931, accepted by CIM and valedicted 3 August 1933. (Record, 1932, p. 11; 1933, pp. 118, 151 (testimony); 1934, 73-4, 134; 1935, p. 39; 1936, p. 71; 1937, pp. 31, 61; 138, pp. 14, 44; 1939, p. 111; 1940, pp. 89, 123, 143 (home); 1941, p. 202, 222, 249; 1942, pp. 12, 25 (can’t get back to China, so Y.M.C.A. here; 1943, pp. 25, 28, 61, 169; 1944, pp. 10, 30, 58 (hopes to return to China); on list, 1944.) Still waiting in 1945, in London, engaged to Rev. Norman C. Pateman, CIM missionary on furlough, married 26 March 1945. In London in 1945, where he (husband) was Secretary of the Mission, but hoping to go to China in 1946; still in London in 1947, awaiting going to China, husband still required as Secretary in London, Record, 1946, p. 29; 1947, p. 42, and same on June 1949 list. Still hoping to return to China, daughter born in London, 1948 – Record, 1948, pp. 29, 137; 1949, pp. 60, 140; 1952, pp. 14, 178; 1953, p. 28. Ter-Jubilee booklet has her termination date as 1940 but the 1947 and 1953 Record lists have her as a current missionary. Record, 1947, pp. 7, 168, 1953, p. 11. In February 1952, the Foreign Missions Committee recommended, and the Deacons’ Court, agreed, that she should be sent the same gift (£3) as serving missionaries, because her husband ‘was not paid on a home salary basis’. On Christmas 1956 list, 1933, ‘China, At Home, CIM Headquarters’. Still there in 1965 and when Donald Fleming came to work at OMF HQ and was fully supported, the deacons realized this was illogical and put her back onto full missionary support; but she was not on the spring 1965 list of ‘Your Missionaries’. She died in 1979 and her obituary read, ‘one of our former missionaries, Mrs. Pateman was with the CIM in China from 1933-1940. Until she retired two years ago she worked in OMF headquarters in London.’ Record, March 1979, p. 5.

163 Came to the Chapel in 1920, call to missionary service, All Nations Bible College, turned down by EUSA, accepted by Bolivian Indian Mission, went in November 1933. Record 1933, pp. 151, 185; on Missionary list, 1934, pp. 134, 168, 184-5; 1935, pp. 62, 154; 1936, pp. 34, 154; married Molly Wood, 7 January 1937, 1937, pp. 22, 112, 161; 1938, pp.44, 96 (baby), 143; 1939, pp. 12, 71; 1940, p. 143; 1941, pp. 202, 284, 299, 329 (son), 363; 1943, p. 25 (wife ill); 1943, pp. 42, 169 (daughter); 1944, pp. 30, 136; 1945, 190; 1945, p. 190; 1946, pp. 93, 154; 1947, pp. 11, 14, 22, 29, 56, 93, 122; Not able to get home during Second World War, arrived September 1946. He took up employment with the Y.M.C.A. in Aberdeen in March 1947, wife and daughters stay in Edinburgh meantime, then joined him. Last entry in Record in August 1947. Members of Gilcomston Park Baptist Church, Aberdeen, where he was Church Secretary for some years. Died in August 1956. Wife a Chapel missionary in her own right – see Molly Wood. She remained in the north-east after his death for a while, returning to membership in the Chapel in February 1971 (Record, March 1971, no pagination.). Daughter, still in membership in the Chapel (Mrs. Morag Norton), paid a return visit in 2005.

164 The only reference to him is up in the Ter-Jubilee booklet in 1958, where, in the Missionary Roll of Honour , he is an Associate Member’, listed as having gone to India in 1933 and still there. Qualifications, B.A., M.B., Ch. B. He is not on the list of ‘Our Own Missionaries’ in the Record, 1947, p. 168.

165 The only reference to him is up in the Ter-Jubilee booklet in 1958, where, in the Missionary Roll of Honour, he is not a ‘Present Member’ but is listed as having gone to Nazareth in 1933 and left in 1934. Qualification, M.B., Ch. B.

166 Mrs Isobel Wide – Isobel Stewart was an associate member, took degrees M.A., Ll.B., married Dr. Edgar R. Wide in the Chapel on 23 November 1931, sailed for Congo in January 1932 with RBMU, ceased Chapel membership when she went to the Congo, Record, 1943, p. 137. Nevertheless, in autumn 1947, she and her husband (he was never a member) were welcomed as ‘our esteemed missionary friends’, still RBMU, spoke at the Monday meeting on their way back to Belgian Congo. (Record, 1947, p. 139.) Sidlow Baxter visited them (Record, !950, pp. 156, 190). He spoke in the Chapel, Record, 1951, p. 90 – query whether they were members. Report in Record, 1951, p. 154. In Christmas 1956 list, she is ‘wife of missionary, 1933, Central Africa’. On Ter-Jubilee list of Chapel members in overseas missionary service. Not on 1965 lists.

167 See Adam Wilson on the CD.

168 Married Kennedy. See ‘Mary Weightman (Kennedy)’ on the CD.

169 S.R.N., S.C.M. Record, 1934, pp. 21, 102, 155-7 (testimony), 168, 185, sailed 19 October 1934; 1935, pp. 53, 62, 121; 1936, p. 59; 1937, p. 81; 1938, p. 78; 1939, p. 111, 207 (home for good, unwell); 1940, pp. 10, 32, 109; resigned through ill-health, Deacons’ Minute 12 March 1941. Worked in London until 1954; then had to give up work through arthritis. Ter-Jubilee booklet gives her termination date as 1939. Updates in Record, 1950, p. 41; 1952, p. 178; 1955, p. 25, 1956, p. 61. Died in London on 13/7/69, Record, September 1969, p.15.

170 Joined the Chapel in 1915, became a deacon in 1922, and was secretary of the Christian Service Class. Sunday School Superintendent; Elder in 1927. In October 1934 he went to the Mission to Mediterranean Garrisons in Gibraltar, apparently without being recognized by the Chapel as one of their missionaries at that stage; Record, 1934, pp. 148, 172; 1935, pp. 34, 88-9; 1936, pp. 14, 159; then on Missionary List of December 1936; 1937, Record, pp. 30, 158 (home), 173, 194; decided to go to Hong Kong in December 1937 and worked with the Hong Kong Evangelical Fraternity; Record, 1938, pp. 10, 142; 1939,pp. 12,18, 25 (photo, Hong Kong), 32, 171; 1940, p. 29; 1941, p. 253; 1942, pp. 25, 41, 103, 164 (interned by the Japanese in Hong Kong); 1944, 27, 123, 136; released September 1945, welcomed in Chapel on 7 November, 1945, pp. 169-71, 182, 185. Looking for work in Britain when he was unexpectedly invited to return to Hong Kong; travel permits and a boat passage were providentially provided and he arrived in September 1946. He died suddenly there in November 1946 and was buried there. His wife had predeceased. Record, 1946, pp. 13, 154, 183, 186; 1947, pp. 9, 23.

171 BSc, MB, ChB, DPM. Native of Edinburgh, converted, baptized and brought up in Charlotte Chapel, trained as a doctor in order to be a medical missionary, but the door closed, so became assistant MOH at Oldbury, Birmingham. Then married Dr. Patrick Petrie, who for eight years had practiced in Arabia and went with him to Aden in 1935, helping in his work. Furlough and son in 1936, returned to Aden. On Chapel list of missionaries in December 1936. To their surprise, they were asked to live and work in Sana, capital of Yemen, as medical officers in the employ of the king, he in eye work, she among women and children – the first British subjects ever to live and work there. They were on leave in Scotland when the Second World War broke out, he was allowed to return to Sana but the British Government would not allow her and the two children (boys) to return to Yemen under war conditions. She took them to Jamaica. Not on 1944 list. Ter-Jubilee booklet gives her termination date as 1938. Record, 1935, p. 3; 1936, pp. 51, 108, 181; 1937, pp. 30, 174; 1941, pp. 244, 250 (most of the information about her comes from here).

172 Given grant in own right, before married Adam Wilson, Deacons 9/1/35 – ? her status. Sailed 11/1/35 to marry Adam Wilson; valedicted 6/1/35; Record, 1935, pp. 25 (testimony), 44 (marriage). Sister of Annie. For further details, see Adam Wilson. She is on the list of ‘Our Own Missionaries’ in the Record, 1947, p. 168.

173 Formerly a member of the Portobello and Dublin Street Baptist churches, she became actively involved for nine years with the Chapel’s High Street Mission, where for six years she was head of the Primary Department and for two years Girl Guide Captain. Record, 1935, pp. 36, 147 (Mount Hermon Bible College, London, for training), grant from Training Fund, 11/7/34, 25/9/35, and accepted as missionary in 6/11/35, photo under her maiden name in album. (‘One of the eleven of our younger people who have gone out into full-time Christian service during the first ten years of Sidlow Baxter’s pastorate.’ Sidlow Baxter’s review of 1935-45, Record, 1945, pp. 165–6, 173.) Valedicted from the Chapel for missionary service in Bolivia in 1935. Record, 1935, 117 (sailed 11/35), 132, 135 147 (testimony), 149; 1936, pp. 30, 172; 1937, pp. 14 (married Alexander Clark, 7/1/37, who had served in Bolivia since 1933), 22, 112. For entries after that, see note about him. She joined (must mean rejoined) the Chapel by transfer in February 1971, along with her daughter Morag (now Mrs. Norton) . She died in May 1987, obituary in the Record, August 1987, p. 12. Morag has researched her parents’ missionary service, including a return visit to Bolivia in 2005.

174 Rev, Robert and Dr. Chris Martin worked in India and Pakistan from 1936. Following several years’ service in the United Christian Hospital at Lahore, in Pakistan, they worked in Delhi Gate Clinic in that city. Robert worked in hospital administration and chaplaincy work until 1969. Chris died and he retired to Scotland and took up a business appointment here. Neither was ever supported financially by the Chapel. Robert was born in 1912 in East Calder. At an early age he committed his life to Jesus Christ through a Summer Tent Campaign led by the Faith Mission. Called of God to missionary service, he attended Emmanuel Bible College in Swansea. He went to northern India from 1936–39 under the auspices of the Worldwide Evangelisation Crusade. Due to severe illness, he returned to Scotland and then the door to India was firmly closed due to the Second World War. He attended the Baptist College with a view to further studies and pastoral ministry. In India he had met, at Language School, Dr Christina Mactaggart, who came from Charlotte Chapel. On his return to Edinburgh in 1939, he started attending the Chapel and was active in Sunday School and YPM. He did not join the Chapel until 1944 (Record, 1945, p. 173). First mention in the Record is as a temporary Sunday School teacher in 1943, reporting on his work among boys and girls in India, but he was described as a Chapel missionary when he married Christina McTaggart in 1944 (‘both members of Charlotte Chapel, both missionaries home on furlough’). In 1941, Dr McTaggart had come home on furlough and for further studies. Chris and Bob were asked to take a meeting in Glasgow and that was the turning point in their relationship. After their marriage they went to Shetland, Chris to be GP in Lerwick and Bob to be Pastor of the Burra Isle Baptist Church. He was ordained and was always known, after that, as the Rev. Bob Martin, even although his work was in hospital administration. He, not she was described as ‘one of the eight who, having already served as missionaries, have joined us and gone out from us during the first ten years of Sidlow Baxter’s pastorate.’ From 1945–1969 they were back in their beloved India, to work with the Ludhiana Hospital, Chris as the gynaecologist and Bob as Hospital Administrator. While at Ludhiana they were approached by the American Presbyterian Church who wished to support them. This meant a period of work in the States, for Chris to study and do medical work and for Bob to do Hospital Administration and take the examinations. They were offered lucrative permanent positions in the United States, which they turned down. ‘No problem’, said Bob, ‘We were called by God for our working life to India and Pakistan – money did not feature in our decision.’ Report 1946 from Ludhiana, where wife was at the Women’s Christian Med. College, three months after leaving Edinburgh. (Record, 1943, p. 105; 1944, pp. 120, 136; 1945, pp. 75, 158, 182; 1946, p. 45. 1947, p. 41 (long report); Record, 1948, pp. 13, 109, 140 (Chris home to visit her mother), 157; 1949, pp. 92, 109; 1950, pp. 29, 42 (home early), 60; 1951, pp. 62, 178 (in America), 190; 1953, pp. 7 (brief visit to Edinburgh on way back to India), 50, 144; 1954, p. 11; 1955, pp. 43 (home. Ill), 58, 76, 195 (return); 1956, pp. 94, 141 (Chris home for medical emergency; 1957, pp. 141, 156, 172; 1958, pp. 28, 62 (home); 1959, pp. 30, 59, 157 (return); 1960, p. 14; 1961, p. 110 (return, September); 1962, pp. 30, 158; 1963, pp. 45, 77, 108, 126; 1964, April, p. 23, May, p. 3, June, p. 23 (sailed again), July, p. 21, August, p. 22; 1965, May, p. 23 (home), August, p. 20 (returned); 1966, January, p. 21, July, p. 21, September, p. 21; 1968, July, p. 22 (Lahore); 1967, January, p. 22; 1969, August, p. 23; returned to India. In 1953 Record list, with the American Presbyterian Board. In 1964 list, with his wife. On their retirement, they planned a World Tour - travel they enjoyed - but sadly it was cut short as the cancer Chris had had operated on 12 years previously reappeared. They had so little retirement together as she died in 1971. Bob said, ‘A perfect marriage and a wonderful life - all given to us by God. Bob had another twenty-two years of life, and filled them actively. (This from the Record, July 1993, pp. 6-7). Not mentioned in the Record from1971 until August 1977, more letters in 1977 (3), 1978 (1), no more letters and he was not on the 1978 missionary list. He himself was diagnosed with cancer, but in talking at the Marie Curie Hospice, he never once questioned God about it. ‘He gave me a wonderful life, a perfect marriage, and would see me through this crisis.’ He never knew fear again. He died in June 1993. The four meaningful things in his life were, the Faith Mission, Charlotte Chapel, the American Presbyterians and the Salvation Army. The Salvation Army provided him a home at Sunnyside in 1988, for which he was enormously grateful. He became a Salvationist, and proved himself to be a first class Soldier of the Army. (Record, July 1993, pp 6–7. Ter-Jubilee booklet gives his starting date as 1936. Both were valedicted on 16 September 1945, but he still awaited a passage (?perhaps doctors had a higher priority). Status, as far as the Chapel is concerned, was in 1945, not home-grown as a Chapel member but ‘having already served as a missionary, has joined us and gone out from us’ (Record, 1945, p. 173). Regular reports, but not on financial support list in spring 1965. On the list of ‘missionaries from the Chapel who have retired from overseas service’ in 1973, 1975, 1980, but not supported. In 1985 he was attending the Gorgie Salvation Army in Edinburgh, although a member of the Chapel, and transferred his membership to them in December 1985.He died in June 1993 and the service was in the Gorgie Salvation Army citadel.

175 Felt called to missionary service from the age of 16, she studied at Edinburgh University under the E.M.M.S., graduated M.B., Ch. D. in 1933, then did tropical medicine studies at the University of Liverpool, awarded D.T.M.; also (? when) M.R.C.O.G.; followed by a year at the Elsie Inglis Hospital, Edinburgh; (‘One of the eleven of our younger people who have gone out into full-time Christian service during the first ten years of Sidlow Baxter’s pastorate.’ Sidlow Baxter’s review of 1935-45, Record, 1945, pp. 165–6, 173.) Ridgelands Missionary Training College, then in April 1936, six months in EMMS Nazareth, then on to the staff of the Ludhiana Women’s Christian Medical College, India, in October 1936, where for five years she took charge of the obstetrics and gynecology wards. Record, 1929, p. 140;, 1933, p. 118; 1936, pp. 72, 89, 137, 156-7 (testimony), 181; 1937, p. 96; 1938, pp. 96, 128; 1939, pp. 32, 111, 147 (furlough for sick leave), 162, 206 (return to India), 231; 1940, pp. 80, 110; 1941, p. 361 (home); 1942, p. 28; 1943, pp. 23, 41; 1944, pp. 41, 120; (married Robert Martin on 25/7/44 while on furlough in Edinburgh, whom she had met in language school and who became chaplain and hospital administrator at Ludhiana.) See Robert Martin. Owing to war-time conditions, they went to Burra Isle Church, Shetland, but hoping to return to India in autumn 1945.Both were valedicted on 16 September 1945, she to return to the Women’s Christian Medical College, Ludhiana, India, and she left Glasgow on 20 September. He still awaited a passage (? perhaps doctors had a higher priority).1945, pp. 75, 158, 182; 1947, p. 41 (long report). In the 1950s, the husband and wife team worked with the American Presbyterian Board; details in Record, February 1970, p. 9. In 1964 list, with her husband. Regular reports, but not on financial support list in spring 1965.Retired to Edinburgh in 1970, but she died here on 13 December 1970. Record, February 1970, p. 9. Fuller references in the Record to their service are under Robert Martin.

176. The Ter-Jubilee booklet in 1958 includes her in the Missionary Roll of Honour, as Colombia, South America from 1935, with a termination date of 1945. For other details, see her husband. See also ‘Jessie McNaughton’ on the CD.

177 M.A., Edinburgh University, then B.D. in 1936; to B.T.I. 1936. ‘One of the eleven of our younger people who have gone out into full-time Christian service during the first ten years of Sidlow Baxter’s pastorate.’ Sidlow Baxter’s review of 1935-45, Record, 1945, pp. 165–6, 173. He was accepted by CIM, valedicted and ordained for missionary work, 1937, could not get away because of war in China so preached in Furnace, finally sailed September 1938. Record, 1936, pp. 135, 170; 1937, pp. 105, 157,173; 1938, pp.41, 111, 158 (testimony); 1939, pp. 72 (ordained), 171; 1940, pp. 61-2 (full); 1941, pp. 253, 363. On 1944 list. Married a Chinese girl on 24 August 1944 so had to resign from CIM because of their policy on this, but secured teaching position on staff of Bible School connected with CIM and still a Chapel missionary. She came to Scotland in August 1946 and he, having been in New York, arrived in September. Record, 1945, pp. 13, 109; 1946, pp. 73, 136, 154; 1947, pp. 30, 137, 153 (inducted as minister, Wishaw Baptist church). Preached in the Chapel, 1950; 1950, p. 73. Pastor of Wishaw Baptist Church, 1947–58 (at least) and lecturer in New Testament at the Baptist Theological College of Scotland, 1957–8 (at least). Record, 1951, p. 138; 1956, pp. 57,73..

178 Associate member. M.B., Ch. B., F.R.C.S.E. No apparent mention in Record at the time, but the Ter-Jubilee booklet in 1958 gives his starting date as 1938. He is not on the list of ‘Our Own Missionaries’ in the Record, 1947, p. 168. In Edinburgh in 1948 – reports in Record, 1948 p, 91; 1955, p.10; 1956 p. 189, February 1965 p. 22; March 1966 p.3; 1969; 1971. At the Ter-Jubilee in 1958, he was described in the Conference brochure as: ‘Dr Cedric Cooper, M.B., Ch.B., F.R.C.S.E., and his wife Jessie (nee Hutton), have been in Lovedale for twenty years. Working at first with the Church of Scotland, they stayed on to maintain the Christian witness and tradition of their hospital when the South African Government took over its management.’ See footnote for wife for their position in 1957 as ‘in secular employment for missionary service’. In 1964 list, along with his wife. On 1965 list, with occasional (second-hand) reports, but not financial support. Retired in 1973, and ceased to be on the Christmas list.

179 See Cedric Cooper. Maiden name, Hutton. She was a full member, he was not. She married Dr Cedric Cooper, 1937, Lovedale, South Africa, Record, 1937, pp. 189-90. She is not on the list of ‘Our Own Missionaries’ in the Record, 1947, p. 168, but she is on the Christmas 1956 list as ‘wife of missionary, 1937, South Africa’. In the 1957 Record, p. 28, they are in a new category, ‘In secular employment for missionary service’. Both are named but only she has an asterisk as ‘our own missionary’. In 1964 list, along with her husband. On 1965 list, with occasional (second-hand) reports, but not financial support. For other information, see husband.

180 Miss Bessie Barnie, financially supported by the Chapel. ‘One of the eleven of our younger people who have gone out into full-time Christian service during the first ten years of Sidlow Baxter’s pastorate.’ (Sidlow Baxter’s review of 1935-45, Record, 1945, pp. 165–6, 173.) She was with the Sudan United Mission in Nigeria from 1939 to 1973. (Record, 1936, p. 27 (BTI); 1937, p. 80; 1939, pp. 50, 66 (valedictory and testimony), 111, 132, 212; 1940, pp. 62, 110, 159, 170; 1941, pp.284, 299, 363; 1942, pp. 78, 90, 106, 189; 1943, pp. 42, 93; 1944, pp. 45, 105, 119 home in July 1944); spoke in Chapel, then in England, returned to Nigeria April 1946. Reports from Nigeria on her return – Record, 1945, pp. 10, 45, 158, 169, 182, 185; 1946, pp. 13, 74, 89, 109, 185; 1947, p. 42; 1948, p. 14; 1949, pp. 89, 92, 153, 186; 1950, p. 36; 1951, pp. 46, 157; 1952, pp. 15, 63, 76, 103, 159, 178, 180, 189; 1953, pp. 9, 130; 1954, pp. 45, 174; 1955, pp. 90, 121, 137, 197, returned by air, p. 195; 1956, p. 13; 1957, pp. 44, 77, 157,; 1958, pp. 12, 107, 139, 158, 189. At the Ter-Jubilee in 1958, she was described in the Conference brochure as: ‘Miss Bessie Barnie has been with the S.U.M. in Nigeria since 1939. Hospital accountant and Guide leader at Vom for many years, she is now dealing with the administration of Gindiri Teachers’ Training College.’ . Record, 1959, pp. 45, 77; 1960, pp. 29, 110; 1961, pp. 93, 126, 190; 1962, pp. 141, 174; 1963, pp. 45, 108, 126, 174; 1964, June p.21, December p.21; 1965, August p,20, October p.21 (home); 1966, April p.22, July p.21; 1967, May, p.23; 1968, February p.23, June p.23, September p.22; In 1969, she was based on Kabwir and toured the district, helping local women to appreciate the Word of God and to train their families in it. Record, 1969, February p.21, March p.23, May p. 22 (home), September p.23, November p.23; 1970, March, July, September, December; 1971, July, September, December; 1972, June, July August, November (home on deputation; 1973, May, August; Retired in August 1973. On the list of ‘missionaries from the Chapel who have retired from overseas service’ in 1973, 1975, 1980, supported. On the financial support list, quarter- support (i.e., £50 personal and £50 to the Society every quarter) in 1980. Two reports in 1975 Record. In November 1989, she handed the writer a 24 page typed autobiography, which is in the Sidlow Baxter box of papers in the archives, because it relates mostly to the years that he was at the Chapel. Died 16 August 1990; her obituary in the Record, October 1990, pp. 4-5, read: ‘No-one who heard Bessie pray at the prayer meeting could be unaware of the missionary fire that still burned brightly in her heart after many years of ‘retirement’. In spite of a losing battle against serious ill-health in her latter months, Bessie was as active as she could be in checking manuscripts for the Mission and pursuing her own studies. Her interest in missionary work began in her early teens when she attended missionary meetings at St. Andrew’s Hall, Leith. Her contact with the Sudan United Mission began when, at the age of 16, she became a box-holder and prayer partner. She was baptised and became a member of Charlotte Chapel in 1928. In 1935 she enrolled at the Bible Training Institute in Glasgow where, in addition to the general missionary course, she studied Greek and Music. Then, after a period of service in Dr Barnardo's Orphanage in Washington, Co. Durham, she undertook further study at the Missionary School of Medicine and the School of Oriental Studies. She said that she was challenged that the people of Nigeria ‘deserved her very best’. Bessie was accepted by S.U.M. for service in Nigeria and was valedicted by Rev. J. Sidlow Baxter in 1939, and set sail for Lagos from Liverpool. After a number of placements in the Bauchi Plateau area of Northern Nigeria, she spent most of her missionary service based at Vom where S.U.M. had a Hospital, Leprosarium. Bessie did extensive trekking into many extensive areas and was often pioneering in places where no white person had been before. Because of the war, Bessie was not able to return to UK until 1945, having spent 5 years and 4 months on her first term of missionary service. On her return to Nigeria after a period of working at the Mission H.Q. in Hertford, she resumed her work at Vom. In addition to her primary responsibilities as Secretary/Treasurer, she also oversaw the building and maintenance work, supervised the work amongst the women and girls in particular, and even did the occasional bit of dentistry when required! She was never happier than when on one of her many treks into the bush by foot, or on a bicycle (she covered 40 miles on one day by byke!) and more recently by car. During her last 10 years of service she averaged about 9000 miles each year visiting and encouraging the work among the women. Since her retirement she has maintained an active link with her beloved Nigeria, always on the lookout for any Africans in the city and especially those who speak Hausa. Bessie's attitude to life and to her Lord was beautifully summed up in a recent visit paid to her when in the Royal Victoria. After a reading of scripture and prayer, she was asked, ‘Bessie, if the Lord were to grant you one request, what would it be?’ With no hesitation she replied, ‘I'd ask to be made more like Jesus.’ Well, she is now!’

181 MB. Ch. B. The first reference to him in the Record is ‘experience abroad’, Record, 1939, p. 27; however, the Ter-Jubilee booklet in 1958 gives him as a missionary from 1939, in Palestine, then Arabia and Israel. ‘One of the eleven of our younger people who have gone out into full-time Christian service during the first ten years of Sidlow Baxter’s pastorate.’ (Sidlow Baxter’s review of 1935-45, Record, 1945, pp. 165–6, 173), but no letters from him are printed in the Record. In the Record, 1945, p. 173. He is not on the list of ‘Our Own Missionaries’ in the Record, 1947, p. 168, but he is on the ‘Missionary Roll of Honour’ in the Record, 1963, p. 109, but not in the 1964 list. Arnold Walker (wife died, Record, August 1973, p.8) never a Chapel missionary.

182 MD, DPM, PhD. Both he and his wife were among ‘the eight who, having already served as missionaries, have joined us and gone out from us during the first ten years of Sidlow Baxter’s pastorate.’ Came home in 1948 (Record, 1948, p. 169). On June 1949 list, and wife also. Ter-Jubilee booklet has him still abroad at its date, 1958, but not with mark for current Chapel member. List in 1957 does not mention them at all – Record, 1957, p. 28. Status, as far as the Chapel is concerned, was in 1945, not home-grown as a Chapel member but ‘having already served as a missionary, has joined us and gone out from us’. Confirmed by Sidlow Baxter in Record, 1945, p. 173. Required by government to stay in this country during the war, but in June 1946 sold his medical practice in Larkhall in order to return to South America. Wife and family with him. In Paraguay, March 1947. Record, 1945, p. 173; 1946, p. 106; 1947, pp. 61, 174. In 1947 Record list. At roll revision in 1958, could not be traced and both removed from membership; Elders’ Minute, 18 June 1958; Members’ Minute, 3 May 1962.

183 See her husband.

184 At Sidlow Baxter’s tenth anniversary in the Chapel, in October 1945, described as ‘in training’ – Record, 1945, p. 173. Ter-Jubilee booklet has him still abroad at its date, 1958, but not with mark for current Chapel member. He is not on the list of ‘Our Own Missionaries’ in the Record, 1947, p. 168, nor 1957, p. 28. By September 1958 he was in membership elsewhere.

185 Winifred Tunnah came up through the Chapel Sunday School and youth organizations (no mention of parents in the Chapel), joined the Chapel on 6 February 1938 by baptism, trained as a nurse in the Deaconess Hospital in Edinburgh and the Royal Maternity Hospital in Glasgow, returned to Edinburgh as Sister in Charge of the Children’s Ward until March 1946. She had felt the urge for some years for overseas mission, and after hearing Dr Lechler at a Missionary Convention in the Chapel in 1945, she applied to the Edinburgh Medical Missionary Society in July and was accepted for Damascus; brief testimony in Record 1945, p. 182. At Sidlow Baxter’s tenth anniversary in the Chapel, in October 1945, described as ‘in training’ Record, 1945, p. 173; about to sail for Damascus, farewell on 10 March 1946, reports on arrival, Record, 1946, pp.29, 58, 109, 185; 1947, p. 110 (long report). In 1947 Record list. She worked in Damascus from 1946 to 1952 (reports in the Record in 1948, pp. 77, 93; 1949, p.158; 1950, p.46; home in May, 1950, Record, 1950, p. 90, home 1950. Returned, Record, 1951, p. 57; 1952, p. 31; home to get married, 1952, p. 159. In 1962, she transferred with her husband (David McGowran) to Landsdown Church, Bournemouth. In 1964, described as ‘was a missionary for a few years (Record, 1964, p. 13). She died after illness on 22 April 1970, leaving her husband and a son Kenneth. (Record, July 1970, p, 4; Elders’ Minute, 6 June 1962.)

186 Miss Marjorie Sommerville was with the Overseas Missionary Fellowship (China Inland Mission) from 1946; for five years in China and thereafter in Malaya, where she concentrated on Bible teaching. For her autobiography, see ‘Marjory Sommerville’ on the CD. All other information is here. July 1945, finishing training at Mount Hermon Bible College, London, after nursing training, and accepted by China Inland Mission for China, to complete preparations in CIM Headquarters in London from September. Record, 1945, p. 106. At Sidlow Baxter’s tenth anniversary in the Chapel, in October 1945, described as ‘in training’ – Record, 1945, p. 173; awaiting passage, farewell 11 August 1946, testimony and training, details of journey, Record, 1946, pp. 41, 136, 154, 183; 1947, pp. 29, 109 (long report); 1948, pp. 29, 109, 170; 1950, pp. 50 (ill), 188; 1951, pp. 30 (over illness), 74 (home), 76, 1952, pp. 31, 66 (return, June), 66, 103 (Malaya), 104, 157; 1953, pp. 32, 81; 1954, pp. 28, 45; 1955, pp. 10, 108 (furlough), 137, 153, 195, 197; 1956, pp. 93 (return, May), 141; 1957, pp. 14, 60, 157, 189; 1958, pp. 28, 94, 156. At the Ter-Jubilee in 1958, she was described in the Conference brochure as: ‘Miss Marjory Sommerville, S.R.N., was working in the CIM, Shanghai Hospital, from 1946 to 1951. Thereafter in Malaya she has continued work among the expatriate Hakka Chinese, a hard and proud people who resist the Gospel message. Further reports in the Record, 1959, pp. 45, 109, 158; 1960, pp. 57, 125, 174; 1961, p. 93; 1962, pp. 61, 94, 110, 174; 1963, pp. 13, 61, 107, 158, 173; 1964, April, p. 21, September, p. 22, November, p. 21, December, p. 22; 1965, February, p. 22, June, p. 21; 1966, February, p. 23, April, p. 22, August, p. 21, September, p. 21, November, p. 11;1967, Janaury, p. 21, February, p. 23, March, p. 21, April, p. 21, May, p. 22, August, p. 22, November, p. 21 (returned); 1968, February, p. 23, April, p. 22, June, p. 22, October, p. 23; 1969, February, p. 22, April, p. 22, September, p. 21; 1970, April and November; 1971, January and May (home); 1972, June, at OMF HQ inLondon; support stopped in mid-August 1972, to retired list, Record, 1973, March and May . On the list of ‘missionaries from the Chapel who have retired from overseas service’ in 1973, 1975, 1980, supported. On the financial support list, quarter- support (i.e., £50 personal and £50 to the Society every quarter) in 1980. Died in the Tor, Edinburgh, 21 June 2006.

187 At Sidlow Baxter’s tenth anniversary in the Chapel, in October 1945, described as ‘in training’ (Record, 1945, p. 173); awaiting boat, meantime helping at Rye Lane, 1946, to sail 25/7/46 for Congo; 1946, p. 125, 186; 1947, pp. 109, 174 (two long reports). In 1947 Record list as Chapel missionary; reports from Belgian Congo, Record, 1948, pp. 110, 157. Home to convalesce, 1949, p. 188; 1950, p. 60. Returned to Africa, 22 April 1950, Record, 1950, pp. 60, 78, 189; 1951, pp. 46, 157; 1952, pp. 15, 103 (coming home), 121 (unable to return), ended July 1952. Report in Record, 1952, p. 171, course in tropical medicine, 1952, p. 178, not to return, 1953, p. 111, but in 1953 list she is ‘awaiting new appointment’ and she is not on the 1954 list. In Record, 1955, pp. 43, 57, 108 and 1956, p. 29, in Government service in Sarawak, Borneo. Home in Record, 1956, pp. 126, 169, then back in 1957, pp. 124, 173 and 1958, p. 46. Ter-Jubilee booklet has her still abroad at its date, 1958, but now in Government Service in Kenya. Record, 1958, pp. 89, 92, 108, 111, not returning to mission field but taken post at home. At the Ter-Jubilee in 1958, she was described in the Conference brochure as: ‘Miss Sheila P. Macdonald


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