Minor Program in Population Studies Graduate Student Handbook 2015-2016



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Minor Program in Population Studies

Graduate Student Handbook

2015-2016

The information in this handbook and other University catalogs, publications, or announcements is subject to change without notice. University offices can provide current information about possible changes.


Table of Contents

Program Overview.........................................................................................................................3


Degree Requirements – Master’s Minor in Population Studies.....................................................4
Degree Requirements – Ph.D. Minor in Population Studies..........................................................5
Departmental, Collegiate, and University Policies.........................................................................6
Appendix 1 – List of Courses Approved for the Population Studies Minor....................................7
Appendix 2 – Graduate Faculty in Population Studies................................................................11
Appendix 3 – Program Completion form ………………...............................................................13
Appendix 4 – Petition to Add a Course form ………………………………………….…………….14
Appendix 5 – Instructions to Petition to Add a Course ……………………………………………15


Program in Population Studies

Website: http://www.pop.umn.edu/training/popminor

Director of Graduate Studies for the Population Studies Minor:

Professor John Robert (Rob) Warren

Department of Sociology

909 Social Sciences

267 19th Ave S.

Minneapolis, MN 55455

(612) 624-2310

warre046@umn.edu


Population Studies Faculty Training Committee (2015-2016):

John Robert Warren (Sociology, DGS)

Zack Almquist (Sociology, 1 year term)

Ragui Assaad (HHH, 3 year term)

Kathleen Call (HPM, 3 year term)

Jack DeWaard (Sociology, 2 year term)

Miriam King (MPC, 1 year term)

Susan Mason (EpiCH, 2 year term)


Graduate Student Representative

Meredith Cavin




Program Overview

Population Studies is a multidisciplinary research area at the intersection of the mathematical sciences, the health and social sciences, and public policy. Traditionally, the field has been associated with demography, which is concerned with changes in population size, distribution, and structure due to births, deaths, and migration. In recent decades, the scope of population research has greatly expanded to include such topics as family planning; morbidity and access to health care; demographic transitions; mortality; household and family composition; the life course; schooling; poverty and economic welfare; the aged; minorities; economic development; labor markets and labor force composition; social stratification; urbanization; and population growth, density, and distribution.


The University of Minnesota’s graduate minor in Population Studies was established in the fall of 2003. The Population Studies minor is an interdisciplinary minor administered by the Department of Sociology, in consultation with Minnesota Population Center, in the College of Liberal Arts. Courses for the minor and participating faculty are drawn from the College of Liberal Arts, the Humphrey School of Public Affairs, the School of Public Health, the College of Human Ecology, the Medical School, and the College of Agriculture, Food, and Environmental Sciences.
Goals of the Population Studies Graduate Minor

The Population Studies Minor provides solid grounding for graduate students in the theories and methods of demography, with additional specialized training in five interdisciplinary subject areas: historical demography, population geography, economic demography, public health demography, and family and life course demography.


Program Components

The minor is offered at the master’s and Ph.D. level to any student currently enrolled in a graduate degree program offered by the University of Minnesota Graduate School. Students at both levels are required to take one core course in demographic methods and population issues and elective courses in one of five interdisciplinary subject areas: historical demography, population geography, economic demography, public health demography, and family and life course demography. Students also have the opportunity to carry out both theoretical and applied research in using demographic data.




Degree Requirements – Master’s Minor in Population Studies
Student status. Enrollment in the Population Studies minor program at the master’s level is contingent upon enrollment in a master’s degree program offered by the University of Minnesota Graduate School. Students need not formally apply to enroll in the minor; any student currently in good standing in the Graduate School may elect to complete the minor by fulfilling the requirements and filing a program completion form (see end of this handbook) with the Director of Graduate Studies of Population Studies.
Coursework requirements.
• All students must take one of two core required courses: PA 5301, Population Methods and Issues in the U.S. and the Third World or SOC 5090, World Population Issues.

• In addition to the core course, master’s students will take at least three credits from the list of approved courses (see Appendix 1). Courses may not be in the student’s major field.

• A total of six credits is required for the minor at the master’s level.

• Students must register for all courses A/F; courses taken on a pass/fail basis may not count toward the minor.

• In accordance with Graduate School rules, students may not apply courses in their major field of study to the minor program in Population Studies. Students in the Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs are exempt from this rule for the core course, PA 5301 only. Humphrey Institute students who wish to apply PA 5301 to the Population Studies minor may not also include it in their major program.

Filing the program completion form. Once a student has completed the requirements for the minor, he or she will file a program completion form with the Director of Graduate Studies. The Director of Graduate Studies will approve the form and notify the Sociology Department for formal certification. Students should file no later than the month prior to the month in which they intend to graduate. Program completion forms are available at the back of this handbook or at http://www.pop.umn.edu/training/popminor/popminor-masters.
Filing the degree program with the Graduate School. Students must also formally declare the Population Studies minor on their degree program filed with the Graduate School. The Population Studies Director of Graduate Studies must sign the degree program form (see here for form: https://www.grad.umn.edu/current-students-forms/graduate-minor-request). Students who have already filed with the Graduate School a degree program that does not include the Population Studies minor must petition the Graduate School to change their program; the Population Studies Director of Graduate Studies must sign the petition form. Please consult the Graduate School’s Student Services and Progress Office (316 Johnston Hall) or the Graduate School’s website (https://www.grad.umn.edu/current-students/forms) for more information.
Letter of certification. Some graduate degree programs do not allow a minor program to appear on a student’s transcript. Students in these programs who have completed the Population Studies minor may request an official letter from the Pop Minor DGS certifying their completion of the minor.

Degree Requirements – Ph.D. Minor in Population Studies

Student status. Enrollment in the Population Studies minor program at the doctoral level is contingent upon enrollment in a doctoral degree program offered by the University of Minnesota Graduate School. Students need not formally apply to enroll in the minor; any student currently in good standing in the Graduate School may elect to complete the minor by fulfilling the requirements and filing a program completion form (see end of this handbook) with the Director of Graduate Studies of Population Studies.
Coursework requirements
• All students must take one of two core required courses: PA 5301, Population Methods and Issues in the U.S. and the Third World or SOC 5090, World Population Issues.

• In addition to the core course, doctoral students will take at least nine credits from the list of approved courses (see Appendix 1). Courses may not be in the student’s major field. A student may petition the Director of Graduate Studies to waive the requirement that all courses be from the same subject area if, for example, a student’s planned dissertation topic is closely related to specific courses in two different areas within the Population Studies minor.

• A total of twelve credits is required for the minor at the doctoral level.

• Students must register for all courses A/F; courses taken on a pass/fail basis may not count toward the minor.



• In accordance with Graduate School rules, students may not apply courses in their major field of study to the minor program in Population Studies. Students in the Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs are exempt from this rule for the core course, PA 5301 only. Humphrey Institute students who wish to apply PA 5301 to the Population Studies minor may not also include it in their major program.
Filing the program completion form. Once a student has completed the requirements for the minor, he or she will file a program completion form with the Director of Graduate Studies. The Director of Graduate Studies will approve the form and notify the Sociology Department for formal certification. Students should file the program completion form after completing coursework and in advance of scheduling a defense. Program completion forms are available at the back of this handbook or at http://www.pop.umn.edu/training/popminor/popminor-doctoral.
Filing the degree program with the Graduate School. Students must also formally declare the Population Studies minor on their degree program filed with the Graduate School. The Population Studies Director of Graduate Studies must sign the degree program form (see here for form: https://www.grad.umn.edu/current-students-forms/graduate-minor-request). Students who have already filed with the Graduate School a degree program that does not include the Population Studies minor must petition the Graduate School to change their program; the Population Studies Director of Graduate Studies must sign the petition form. Please consult the Graduate School’s Student Services and Progress Office (316 Johnston Hall) or the Graduate School’s website (https://www.grad.umn.edu/current-students/forms) for more information.
Letter of certification. Some graduate degree programs do not allow a minor program to appear on a student’s transcript. Students in these programs who have completed the Population Studies minor may request an official letter from the Pop Minor DGS certifying their completion of the minor.

Departmental, Collegiate, and University Policies
Academic standards. In accordance with Graduate School policy, students must maintain a minimum GPA of 2.8 in courses in their Population Studies minor program.
Program completion and certification. Students are responsible for filing a program completion form with the Population Studies Director of Graduate Studies and for declaring the minor on their Graduate School degree program. Students will not receive certification of the minor without completing these steps. Students are responsible for knowing and meeting all requirements for degree completion in their home department and the Graduate School.
Other requirements. There is no requirement for an oral examination or capstone project. For master’s and doctoral students whose programs require a traditional final oral exam according to Graduate School regulations, a member of the Population Studies graduate faculty will represent the minor on the final exam committee.
Petitions. Students may petition for a course in which they have completed a significant Population Studies project, or for a particular topics course to be included in their program of study. The Graduate Training Curriculum Committee will review these petitions to determine whether the course is appropriate for the student’s minor program curriculum; approved petitions will be signed by the Director of Graduate Studies. Doctoral students may petition the Director of Graduate Studies to waive the requirement that all elective courses for the minor be from the same subject area; the Director of Graduate Studies may approve these petitions at his or her discretion. Petition forms are available at the back of this handbook or at http://www.pop.umn.edu/training/popminor.
Advising. There is no formal assignment of advisors to students participating in the Population Studies minor program. It is strongly recommended that students consult with the Director of Graduate Studies or other members of the Population Studies graduate faculty (listed in Appendix 2) for advice on their program of study.
Responsibilities. Students are responsible for knowing and meeting the requirements of the program. The Population Studies program and graduate students participating in the program are expected to adhere to the principles laid out in the Graduate School’s document, “Mutual Responsibilities in Graduate Education at the University of Minnesota” (available at http://www.policy.umn.edu/Policies/Education/Education/DOCTORALPERFORMANCE_APPD.html).
The Director of Graduate Studies is responsible for overseeing the program, chairing meetings of the faculty and the Graduate Training Curriculum Committee, advising students, approving petitions on the advice of the Graduate Training Curriculum Committee, and approving program completion forms.
The Graduate Training Curriculum Committee, which consists of at least four and no more than eight Population Studies faculty members, is responsible for reviewing major changes to the curriculum and other features of the minor, and will advise the graduate faculty in Population Studies.
Conduct. Students and faculty in the Population Studies program are expected to adhere to all standards of conduct established by the University of Minnesota and the Graduate School.

Appendix 1 – List of Courses Approved for the Population Studies Minor


Core Course
SOC 5511

World Population Problems (34569)

Section 001

Instructor Anne Meier

Population trends, population dynamics, and the various factors that influence the volume and distribution of populations across the globe. Exposes students to key theories and central methodologies in social demography, and examines key policy questions in the management and engineering of population dynamics across the globe. 3 cr.
OR
PA 5301

Section 001

Population Methods & Issues for the United States & Global South (66395)

Deborah Levison

Basic demographic measures/methodology. Demographic transition, mortality, fertility. Diverse perspectives on nonmarital fertility, marriage, divorce, and cohabitation. Cultural differences in family structure, aging, migration, refugee movements, population policies. Discussion of readings on population growth and environment. 3 cr.




Elective Courses
ApEc 8701

International Economic Development, Growth and Trade

Economics of research/development. Technical change, productivity growth. Impact of technology on institutions. Science/technology policy. 3 cr.

Population studies area of concentration: economic demography.
FSoS 8106

Family Research from Economic Perspectives

Seminar integrates conceptual and methodological perspectives of family social science with economic approaches to studying families. Family investments in human and social capital. Diversities in families; interface of public policies and family economic well-being. 3 cr.

Population studies area of concentration: economic demography, and family and life course demography.
FW 5051

Analysis of Populations

Factors involved in regulation, growth, and general dynamics of populations. Data needed to describe populations, population growth, population models, and regulatory mechanisms. 4 cr.
GERO 5103

Aging and Society

An examination of the broad range of topics and issues related to aging. Consideration of how the processes of aging affect individuals, groups, cohorts, and societies by drawing from research in sociology, psychology, gerontology, and health sciences. Comparisons are made of the processes of aging in U.S. and other countries. 2 cr.
HIST 3797

Methods of Population History

Standard methods of population analysis with a special focus on methods widely used for historical population research. 3 cr.

Population studies area of concentration: historical demography.
HIST 5970

Advanced Research in Quantitative History: Fertility and the Family

The first part of this course examines trends, differentials and transitions in human fertility, focusing on historical and contemporary fertility transitions in developed and developing countries and economic, social, and biological factors affecting fertility. The second part of the course examines issues related to marriage and other romantic partnerships, family, and family change. 4 cr.
HIST 8970

Advanced Research in Quantitative History: Demographic Transition

This course focuses on the transition from high birth and death rates in the United States and Europe in the late nineteenth century to low birth and death rates in the early twentieth century. We will examine early demographic transition theory, recent criticisms, and new and classic studies of the transition and its causes. Although theories of demographic transition have not fared well, the fact remains: life expectancy nearly doubled between 1870 and 1930 while fertility fell from almost 6 children per woman to less than 3. Approximately half of the course will be dedicated to the mortality transition (and the related epidemiological and health transitions) and half dedicated to the fertility transition. Topics will include the public health movement, medicine, contraception, and abortion. A few weeks will be dedicated to comparing demographic transitions in Asia and elsewhere to those in the United States and Europe and the possibility of an on-going "second demographic transition." 4 cr.
HSG 5484

Rural Housing Issues

Housing issues for non-metropolitan places, small towns, and rural areas are explored in this course. Emphasis is on the housing needs and policy implications for targeted rural populations including Native American Indians, immigrants, migrant farm workers, and those living in areas of persistent poverty. Impacts of various rural economic development strategies and public policies on housing availability, adequacy, and affordability will be discussed. 3cr.

Population studies area of concentration: population geography.
HSG 8463

Housing: Race and Class

Roles of difference (race, gender, class) in shaping distribution of housing, particularly in cities. Role of housing in patterns of social differentiation. 3 cr.

Population studies area of concentration: population geography.

PA 5204

Urban Spatial and Social Dynamics

Behavioral theories of internal spatial arrangement, functioning, and characteristics of cities at macro level and how they produce a system of cities. Factors influencing urban spatial structure over time. Urban form, land use/rent. Spatial expression of economic, social, and political forces. 3 cr.

Population studies area of concentration: population geography.
PA 5401

Poverty, Inequality, and Public Policy

Nature/extent of poverty/inequality in the United States, causes/consequences, impact of government programs/policies. Extent/causes of poverty/inequality in other developed/developing countries. 3cr.

Population studies area of concentration: economic demography.
PA 5451/PubH 6281

Immigrant Health Issues

Web-based course. Research skills how to access demographic, health, and background information on immigrants in the United States; determine major character/health needs of immigrants; design “culturally competent” health programs; and advocate for changes to promote immigrant health.

This course is taught entirely on-line, but the interaction among students and between the students and the instructor permit us to get to know one another and to have lively exchanges of ideas and reports on community-based assignments. It is designed for current or future policy makers or service providers who want to understand how to design effective and culturally relevant programs and services for immigrants. Note that no previous health background is required. 'Health' is defined broadly to include social characteristics and access to services. The course can be taken for either four-credits (with final project), or three-credits (without final project)

Course Objectives: 1. Students will acquire research skills necessary to access demographic, health, and background information on immigrants in the U.S. 2. Students will understand the major social and health needs of new immigrants. 3. Students will be able to design `culturally competent programs. 4. Students will learn to advocate for needed changes to promote immigrant wellbeing. Contact the instructor for more information. 3-4 cr.

Population studies area of concentration: public health demography.


PA 8312

Analysis of Discrimination

Introduces students of policy analysis and other applied social sciences to tools for measuring and detecting discrimination in market and nonmarket contexts. Application of modern tools of labor econometrics and race relations research to specific problems of market and nonmarket discrimination.

This is a skills-based course designed to introduce students of applied economics, policy analysis and other applied social sciences to the tools of measuring and detecting discrimination in market and non-market contexts. The focus is on the application of the modern tools of labor econometrics and race relation research to specific problems of market and non-market discrimination. Students will read and critique classic journal articles on the economics of discrimination. They will also work through several exercises designed to sharpen empirical skills related to analyzing discrimination. Students are expected to have a working knowledge of intermediate microeconomics, basic statistics and regression analysis and some familiarity with STATA, SPSS, SAS or similar software programs. 4 cr.



Population studies area of concentration: economic demography.


PA 8390

Advanced Topics in Advanced Policy Analysis Methods -- Global & U.S. Perspectives on Health & Mortality (25852)

The health of populations in developing and developed countries is very different. Within countries, great health disparities exist between more advantaged and more disadvantaged populations. When crafting policies that aim to improve population health, it is crucial to know how to measure health and how to think about the health needs of the specific population in question. This course will provide an overview to the factors driving health, mortality, and aging across different populations. In addition, students will learn the best sources of data and measures to use to describe the health status of a population. Furthermore, students will be able to assess policy options that address the health of their population. 3 cr.
PubH 5099

Population Aging and Health

This survey course introduces core concepts and methods related to population health and aging. Half of the course will focus on demographic measures of population health and aging, primarily life expectancy and mortality, as well as family demography, fertility and migration. The other half of the course will use an epidemiologic approach to population prevalence, incidence and distribution of specific diseases and conditions relevant in older age. 2 cr.
PubH 6370

Social Epidemiology

This course aims to introduce public health and other interested graduate students to the sub-discipline of social epidemiology, including theory and methods. Social epidemiology is the branch of epidemiology that consider s how social interaction and purposive human activity affect health. 2 cr.

Population studies area of concentration: public health demography, and family and life course

demography.
PubH 6605

Reproductive and Perinatal Health

Epidemiology, programs, services, and policies. Social, cultural, psychological, physiologic,

environmental, economic, and political factors that affect reproductive health, pregnancy, and

childbearing. 2 cr.

Population studies area of concentration: public health demography, and family and life course

demography.
PubH 6607

Adolescent Health: Issues, Programs and Policies

Major public health issues of adolescents in the United States. Emphasizes prevention and health promotion strategies and effectiveness of programs/policies. 3 cr.

Population studies area of concentration: public health demography, and family and life course

demography.
PubH 6845

Section 001

Using Demographic Data for Policy Analysis

How to pose researchable policy questions, locate existing data, turn data into a usable format,

understand data documentation, analyze data, communicate findings according to standards of

the professional policy community. Quantitative issues. 3 cr.
PubH 8805

Sociological Theory in Health Services Research

Effect of social structure on health outcomes/behaviors. Current/historical events/issues from

perspective of sociological/social psychological theories. Students apply theories to a topic they

identify. 3 cr.

Population studies area of concentration: public health demography.

SOC 8551

Social Structure and the Life Course

Central concepts and premises of life course analysis as applied to intersocietal (comparative),

intrasocietal (socioeconomic status, race, and gender), and historical variability; institutional

patterning of life course (family, education, work, the polity); deviance and criminal careers;

changes in the self; and methodological strategies. 3 cr.



Population studies area of concentration: family and life course demography.
SOC 8590 (Topics Course)

Sociology of Time: Age, Work and the Gendered Life Course

We are all living in, affected by, using, strategizing around, and moving through multiple layers of time. For the most part, time remains invisible – to scholars as well as to other individuals.

This course offers a sociological approach to time, demonstrating that it is not simply a “given” but, rather, socially constructed: as subjective experience and expectations over the life course;

in the form of cultural beliefs about human development, biological aging, health and the ordering of events; and as a series of age-graded, socially-expected role entries, exits, boundaries, behaviors, and durations. 3 cr.

Population studies area of concentration: family and life course demography.

SOC 8590 (Topics Course)

Work Health and Well-Being

This class introduces perspectives on the life course in relation to work, mental and physical health, and gender. We will focus on three broad themes. The first is that occupational and organizational structures and interactions around work promote health and illness. The second is that this is a dynamic recursive process, producing and reproducing disparities in health and health related resources. The third is that the work-health interface, along with strategic patterns of self-care, vary across time and culture. 3 cr.

Population studies area of concentration: family and life course demography.
SOC 8890

Advanced Topics in Research Methods- Advanced Demographic

This course is a second course in demographic methods. The objective of this course is to introduce students to and familiarize students with some more advanced tools used by demographers for studying human populations. As the term advanced in the course title is used to mean both breadth and depth, this course begins by reviewing some basic demographic measures and models described in Public Affairs 5301 (Population Methods and Issues for the United States and the Global South) and Sociology 5511 (World Population Problems), either of which is a prerequisite for this course. This course then builds from there to cover more advanced measures and models, as well as other topics. Two important features of this course are its emphases on population dynamics (i.e., how fertility, migration, and mortality interact to produce changes in population size, composition, etc.), and, in a quintessentially Minnesota way, on demographic data. 3 cr.


Appendix 2 – Graduate Faculty in Population Studies
John Robert Warren

MPC Training Director and Population Studies Minor Director of Graduate Studies

Department of Sociology
Cawo Abdi

Department of Sociology


Ryan Allen

Humphrey School of Public Affairs


Zack Almquist

Department of Sociology


Ragui Assaad

Humphrey School of Public Affairs


Kathleen Thiede Call

Division of Health Policy and Mgmt, SPH


Benjamin Capistrant

School of Public Health


Kathryn Coursolle

Minnesota Population Center


Jeff R. Crump

Department of Design, Housing, and Apparel


Elizabeth E. Davis

Department of Applied Economics


Jack DeWaard

Department of Sociology


Julia Drew

Minnesota Population Center


Paul W. Glewwe

Department of Applied Economics


Ezra Golberstein

Division of Health Policy and Mgmt, SPH


David J Hacker

Department of History


Janna Johnson

Humphrey School of Public Affairs


Pinar Karaca-Mandic

Division of Health Policy and Mgmt, SPH


Sheela Kennedy

Minnesota Population Center

Miriam L. King

Minnesota Population Center


Deborah Levison

Humphrey School of Public Affairs


Carolyn Liebler

Department of Sociology


Sharon Long

Division of Health Policy and Mgmt, SPH


Susan Mason

Division of Epidemiology, SPH


Ann Meier

Department of Sociology


Phyllis Moen

Department of Sociology


Jeylan T. Mortimer

Department of Sociology


Samuel L. Myers, Jr.

Humphrey School of Public Affairs


J. Michael Oakes

Division of Epidemiology, SPH


Theresa Osypuk

Division of Epidemiology, SPH


Lisa Park

Department of Sociology


Michelle Phelps

Department of Sociology


Joe Ritter

Department of Applied Economics


Evan Roberts

Department of History


Steven Ruggles

Department of History


Tetyana Shippee

Division of Health Policy and Mgmt, SPH


Virginia Solis Zuiker

Department of Family Social Science




Graduate Minor in Population Studies Program Completion Form
Name: ______________________________________________________________
Student ID Number: ___________________________________________________
Phone: _____________________________________________________________
E-mail: _____________________________________________________________
Mailing address (campus address ok): ___________________________________________________________________
Major program: ______________________________________________________
Degree sought: _____ Master’s _____ Ph.D.
Population Studies Minor area of concentration (optional)
_____ Historical Demography
_____ Population Geography
_____ Economic Demography
_____ Public Health Population Studies
_____ Family and Life Course Demography
Course completion

year

term

course #

title

# credits

grade






























































































































Submitted: ___________________________________ ______________________



student’s signature date
Approved: ___________________________________ ______________________

signature, Director of Graduate Studies, Population Studies date
Submit this form with a copy of your University of Minnesota transcript to: Minnesota Population Center, 50 Willey Hall.

Graduate Minor in Population Studies Petition to Add a Course
Name: ______________________________________________________________
Student ID Number: ___________________________________________________
Phone: _____________________________________________________________
E-mail: _____________________________________________________________
Mailing address (campus address ok): ___________________________________________________________________
Major program: ______________________________________________________
Degree sought: _____ Master’s _____ Ph.D.
Population Studies Minor area of concentration (optional)
_____ Historical Demography
_____ Population Geography
_____ Economic Demography
_____ Public Health Population Studies
_____ Family and Life Course Demography
I wish to petition to include the following course(s) in my Population Studies program:


year

term

course #

title and instructor

# credits

grade























































Submitted: ___________________________________ ______________________



student’s signature date

Approved: ___________________________________ ______________________



signature, Director of Graduate Studies, Population Studies date
Submit this form with a copy of the syllabus for each course to: Minnesota Population Center, 50 Willey Hall.
Instructions to Petition to Add a Course
Only courses that are in the approved Population Studies curriculum may be applied automatically to a student’s minor program. To obtain permission to include a course not in the curriculum, fill out this petition form, attach a copy of the syllabus for each course noted on the form, and submit all material to the Minnesota Population Center, 50 Willey Hall. All petitions for additions to a student’s minor program require review and approval by the Director of Graduate Studies and the Graduate Training Curriculum Committee.
Use this petition for the following reasons:
1. To request that a course in which you completed a significant project in Population Studies be included in your program of study. Include a description of your project, outlining the nature of the topic, the methods used, and the final length.
2. To request that a particular topics course be included in your program of study.

You must supply a copy of the syllabus for each course listed on the petition form.
For questions, please contact: grumore@umn.edu


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