Mighty Jackie The Strikeout Queen by Marissa Moss Grade 4 : Unit 2



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Creating Text-Dependent Questions for Close Analytic Reading

Selection: Mighty Jackie The Strikeout Queen__ by Marissa Moss___ Grade 4 :Unit 2__

Initial Planning

Identify the Core Understandings and Key Ideas of the Text

As in any good backward mapping process, teachers should start by identifying the key insights they want students to understand from the text. Keeping the major points to be made in mind is crucial for crafting an overarching set of successful questions. This step is also critical for creating a means to check for student understanding.


Identify Lesson Focus: (Review Qualitative Measures)

Moderately Complex:

More than one level of meaning, two themes-one being political, the other individual

Text Structure- some shifts in time

Graphics- illustrations generally help comprehension

Language Features: very complex with abstract, irony, and figurative language

Vocabulary- some academic words, with higher level word choice

Sentence Structure-very complex, clauses, phrases, use of dashes and quotation marks

Knowledge /demands-Moderately complex to very complex; background of baseball and gender inequality


CCSS Focus Standards:

Use shorter text or excerpts of longer texts

Supporting Student Needs

Considerations for Reader and Task

To really understand a complex text, the reader will have to read it more than once, to make sense of what the author is saying and to glean the details at both the explicit and implicit levels. First and foremost, close reading demands a willingness to return to the text to read part or even all of it more than once, ultimately instilling habits of mind in approaching text. Planning for multiple reads as well as multiple purposes for reads is essential in order to support all student needs.

Potential Challenges this Text Poses:
Meaning: (Conceptual Understanding Examples, pg. #)

Multiple levels of meaning,

ex. 1. Gender inequality, pg. 166,” “everyone knew that girls didn’t play baseball.

2. Perseverance: Pg. 169: “She practiced pitching till it was too cold and dark to stay outside.”
Language: (Syntax, Vocabulary Examples, pg. #)

Extensive use of similes: “. . .might as well have ‘a trained seal behind the plate’ as have a woman standing there.” (p. 166), “You throw like a girl” (simile/irony, p. 169), “Jackie held that ball like it was part of her arm . . .” (p. 173
Knowledge Demands: (Briefly describe the knowledge demands the text requires of students.) Life Experiences: Very to Moderately to Complex: . . .varying levels of complexity, experiences portrayed are uncommon to most readers.

  • Student population may not have the experience of pitching a baseball.

  • Student population ould be exposed but not all of them with gender exclusion in sports activities, attitudes towards females, simply based on their gender.



Strategies/Lessons to access complex text: Pre teach
CCSS Focus Standards:
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.4.3: Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a character's thoughts, words, or actions).
Preteach Baseball terms and history

Picture Walk with discussion before reading

Teacher reads aloud first read to emphasize prosody (as an aide for comprehension).

Thinking Maps, Think-Pair-Share, Group Discussions, Teacher Modeling, Explicit directions and expectations

Pre teach

Activity/Lesson





Checking for Understanding

How will you know that learning has occurred? Planning for a means to check student understanding is crucial. Refer back to the Lesson Focus to plan intentionally to check for student understanding.
Describe how you will check for student understanding:

Culminating Task: Students will write to the following prompts-

Describe Jackie’s character and the impact she made on history. Cite evidence from the text.

Why is this event important to write about?

Close Reads

Create Coherent Sequence of Text-Dependent Questions

Create Coherent Sequences of Text-Dependent Questions – Start Small to Build Confidence

The opening questions should help orient students to the text, and be specific enough to answer so students gain confidence. The sequence of questions should not be random but should build toward more coherent understanding and analysis to ensure that students learn to stay focused on the text to bring them to a gradual understanding of its meaning.

Think of ways to maximize student engagement.




Close Read I

Learning Focus: Focus CCSS: RL 4.3

Text-Dependent Questions

Evidence-Based Answers/Pg. #

Read page 169. What is Jackie’s experience with baseball as a child? Who were the two people who noticed her talent and what did they do to support her?

Pg. 169. Jackie played ball with her father. He told her she could do anything. She practiced for hours. “Dazzy Vance, the star pitcher for the Brooklyn Dodgers, had taught her how to pitch. A real pitcher talking to a little girl was all Jackie needed to start dreaming of playing in the World Series.”

Jackie worked at baseball, she worked hard”, “She practiced pitching till it was too cold and dark,… until her shoulder ached, until her eyes were blurry”




Read page 166. What did the New York papers write about the exhibition game?

Explain the meaning of what the reporters said.

Read page 169. What did people think about girls playing baseball?


Pg.166. The media reported girls were not major league baseball players. “The New York Daily News sneered that she would swing a mean lipstick instead of a bat.”

The reporters were saying that Jackie would not be able to play well against the men because she was a girl.

Pg. 169. Jackie knew girls weren’t supposed to play baseball. All the boys told her that. It was common for people to say “You throw like a girl” as an insult.


Pg. 169, pg. 173 ,pg 174

Describe Jackie’s character when she’s pitching. Pg. 179. How did Jackie feel when she struck them out?



Pg. 170. Jackie was confident, knowledgeable and skilled- “It’s my game.” “Jackie was ready for him.”

Pg 173 “Jackie held the ball like it was…she knew exactly where it would go”

She knew the batter would expect the same pitch…so this time she threw…”



Pg. 179. Jackie was proud and happy, “She’d done what she’d always know she could do. She’d shown the world how a girl could throw-as hard and as fast and as far as she wanted.”


Why did the illustrator end the story with a little girl on the pitcher’s mound?


The illustration shows that Jackie dreamed of this from the time she was very little, to show that she worked hard all her life and never gave up, and realized her dream.


Close Read II.

Learning Focus: Describe the event Focus CCSS: RL4.3

Text-Dependent Questions

Evidence-Based Answers/Pg. #

What was unusual about this exhibition game?


Pg. 166, The pitcher was a girl. “Jackie was a girl and everyone knew that girls didn’t play major league baseball.”

Page 173. What are some words and phrases the author uses to describe the spectators in the beginning of the game? How do these words mean the crowd is feeling about Jackie?

But the next pitch was another ball. Now the crowd was hooting and jeering. The Babe was snickering with them.” This means they were laughing at her, or saying she wasn’t any good.

Page 175 and 165. Who was the first batter and why was this significant?


Babe Ruth was a legendary player, “the Home Run King”.. It was significant because if Jackie could face the best batter in the Big Leagues then she would show how good she was.

Page 175-74. How does the author describe Babe Ruth’s reaction to batting against Jackie?


He gaped, after she threw a strike, snickered when she threw a ball. He was mad after the second strike. He glared at umpire and threw the bat down in disgust.

Pg 179. How did the crowd react at the end of this event? Why did it change from the beginning?

The crowd, so ready to boo her before, rose with a roar, clapping and cheering like crazy.” In the beginning they thought there was no chance Jackie would strike out Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig, but at the end the crowd realized they had just seen something very special. Jackie had proven she was a great pitcher.

Why was this event considered historical?

This was an historical event because it proved that a woman could play a major league sport just a well as the boys. Jackie worked very hard to make her dream come true and it did.

Checking for Understanding

How will you know that learning has occurred? Planning for a means to check student understanding is crucial. Refer back to the Lesson Focus to plan intentionally to check for student understanding.
Describe how you will check for student understanding:

Culminating Task: Students will write to the following prompts-

Describe Jackie’s character and the impact she made on history. Cite evidence from the text.

Why is this event important to write about?


Vocabulary

KEY WORDS ESSENTIAL TO UNDERSTANDING

Words addressed with a question or task



WORDS WORTH KNOWING

General teaching suggestions are provided in the Introduction




TEACHER PROVIDES DEFINITION

not enough contextual clues provided in the text





Fluke, page 174

Callused, page 149

Blurred over, page 169

Hooting and jeering, page 173
Gaped, pg. 179

Flinched, pg. 173

Snickering, pg. 173

Insult, pg. 169


STUDENTS FIGURE OUT THE MEANING

sufficient context clues are provided in the text





Bleachers, pg. 170

a big mountain of a man”, page 173



Delicate, page 173

Sultan of Swat”, page 174

Iron Horse”, page 174


Joanne Duehren and Vanessa Anderson





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