Materials for Teaching, Research and Policy Making



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KEY WORDS: Educational Surveys; Canada; School-to-Work Transition; Occupational Training; Employees Training; Vocational education; Educational Attainment; Educational Level; Postsecondary Education.

Statistics Canada. (2000). Youth in transition survey. Ottawa: Statistics Canada.


Cycle one for the cohort aged 15 includes information collected from youth, their parents, and school principals. The sample design is a school-based frame that allows the selection of schools, and then individuals within schools. This design permits analysis of school effects, a research domain not currently addressed by other Statistics Canada surveys. Methods of data collection include a self-completed questionnaire for youth and school principals, a telephone interview with parents, and assessment of youth competency in reading, science and mathematics as using self-completed test booklets provided under the integration of YITS with the OECD Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA). A pilot survey was conducted in April 1999 and the main survey took place in April-May 2000. Interviews were conducted with 30,000 students aged 15 from 1,000 schools in Canada. A telephone interview with parents of selected students took place in June 2000.
URL: http://www.statcan.ca/cgi-bin/imdb/p2SV.pl?Function=getSurvey &SDDS =4435 &lang =en&db=IMDB&dbg=f&adm=8&dis=2
KEY WORDS: Educational Surveys; Canada; School-to-Work Transition; Occupational Training; Employees Training; Vocational education; Educational Attainment; Educational Level; Postsecondary Education.

Bowlby, J. W., & McMullen, K. (2002). At a crossroads: First results for the 18 to 20-year-old cohort of the youth in transition survey. Hull: Statistics Canada and Human Resources Development Canada.


This report provides a descriptive overview of the first results from the 2000 Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) for 18-20-year-olds in Canada. These early results draw a picture of where youth stand in terms of both their educational participation and attainment and their labour market participation as of December 1999. Youth at this age are in transition - some are in the final stages of completing high school, others are continuing their education at the post-secondary level, while still others have left the school system altogether. Most leave after graduation, while some have left school before completing their program, or using the more common term employed in this report, have "dropped out" of school. Youth in this age group also exhibit different levels of attachment to the labour market, with some combining work and school and others being full labour market participants.

Given variable pathways, a survey such as the YITS that tracks the progress of youth is a key instrument for identifying the factors that can assist youth in the successful pursuit of their education and employment goals. The second cycle of the YITS, scheduled for early 2002, will collect new information from this same group of youth, tracking their educational and labour market activities over time.


URL: http://www.statcan.ca/english/freepub/81-591-XIE/81-591-XIE00001.pdf
KEY WORDS: Education Surveys; Canada; OECD; Educational Planning; Career education; Vocational Education; Longitudinal Studies; School-to-Work Transition; Public Schools; High School Graduates; Academic Achievement; Career Education; Vocational Education; Employment; Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA).

National Health Surveys.


Statistics Canada. (1995). National Population Health Survey, 1994-95 public use microdata files. Ottawa: Statistics Canada. Health Statistics Division.
The National Population Health Survey (NPHS) is designed to collect information related to the health of the Canadian population. The first cycle of data collection began in 1994, and will continue every second year thereafter. The survey will collect not only cross-sectional information, but also data from a panel of individuals at two-year intervals. The target population of the NPHS includes household residents in all provinces, with the principal exclusion of population on Indian Reserves, Canadian Forces Bases and some remote areas in Quebec and Ontario. Separate surveys were conducted to cover the Yukon, the Northwest Territories and the Institutions (long term residents of hospitals and residential care facilities) and will be presented at a later stage. The National Population Health Survey (NPHS) was conducted by Statistics Canada. This manual has been produced to facilitate the manipulation of the microdata file of the survey results.
KEY WORDS: Public Health; Canada; Statistics; Health Surveys; Health Status Indicators; Medical Data Processing.

Statistics Canada. (1998). National Population Health Survey, 1996-97 Household component public use microdata files. Ottawa: Statistics Canada. Health Statistics Division.


The National Population Health Survey (NPHS) uses the Labour Force Survey sampling frame to draw a sample of approximately 20,000 households. The sample is distributed over four quarterly collection periods. In each household, some limited information is collected from all household members and one person in each household is randomly selected for a more in-depth interview. The questionnaire includes content related to health status, use of health status information includes self-perception of health, a health status index, chronic conditions, and activity restrictions. The use of health services is probed through visits, health care providers, both traditional and non-traditional, and the use of drugs and other medications. Health determinants include smoking, alcohol use, physical activity and a special focus in the second cycle of the survey was access to services with questions on preventive tests and examinations probing for frequency, reasons for use or non-use and barriers encountered. The demographic and economic information includes age, sex, education, ethnicity, household income and labour force status.
KEY WORDS: Public Health; Canada; Statistics; Health Surveys; Health Status Indicators; Medical Data Processing.

Statistics Canada, Health Canada, & Canadian Institute for Health Information. (2006). National survey of the work and health of nurses (NSWHN). Ottawa, ON: Statistics Canada.


The main objective of the 2005 National Survey of the Work and Health of Nurses is to provide an overall picture of the health and working conditions of regulated nurses in Canada. A total of 18,676 nurses were interviewed, representing registered nurses (RN), licensed practical nurses (LPN) and registered psychiatric nurses (RPN) employed in a variety of health care settings and in all provinces and territories. The survey's impressive response rate of 80% reflects the enthusiasm and support of nurses across the country.

The survey collected information on a rich array of topics reflecting the physical and emotional challenges nurses face in delivering patient care today. Nurses answered many questions about the quality of patient care, working relations with co-workers and managers, the amount of time they work to get their jobs done, and the way they feel about their jobs and careers as nurses. Data from the 2005 NSWHN will provide an invaluable resource for researchers, health care providers, policy makers and anyone with an interest in human resources, particularly in the health care field.


KEY WORDS: Surveys; Work; Health; Nurses; Canada.

Miscellaneous Statistics Canada Canadian Surveys.


Statistics Canada. (1995). Canadian out-of-employment panel survey. Ottawa: Statistics Canada.
The Canadian Out-of-Employment Panel Survey was conducted by Statistics Canada for Human Resources Development Canada, Strategic Evaluation and Monitoring. This survey interviewed people who had a job interruption during one of the two reference periods: (1) Jan. 29-Mar. 11, 1995; or (2) Apr. 23-June 3, 1995.

The survey gathered information on subsequent employment during a 13-month period, background demographics on the individual and the household, as well as information on job search activities and outcomes, income, assets and debts, expenditures, and training. The survey collects information on employment history during an 18-month period, background demographics on the individual and the household, as well as information on job search activities and outcomes, income, assets and debts, expenditures, and training. The main changes to the sample design compared to COEP 1995 are as follows: all individuals who are issued an ROE in the reference period are included in the 1996 design whereas under the 1995 design, only individuals whose ROE was issued for particular reasons were included; and the reference periods for the 1996 design are consecutive quarters, giving complete coverage across time whereas for the 1995 design, two discrete time periods were selected. As well, information is collected about all employers the individual worked for during the reference period whereas under the 1995 design, information was only collected for the ROE employer, the next employer and the current employer.


URL: http://www.statcan.ca/english/Dli/Metadata/coep/1995/coep95gid1.pdf

URL: http://www.statcan.ca/english/Dli/Metadata/coep/1995/coep95que1w1.pdf

URL: http://www.statcan.ca/english/Dli/Metadata/coep/1995/coep95que2w1.pdf

URL: http://www.statcan.ca/english/Dli/Metadata/coep/1995/coep95cbk1.pdf


KEY WORDS: Employment Surveys; Canada; Employment; Unemployment.

Statistics Canada. (1995). Survey of work arrangements. User's guide. Ottawa: Statistics Canada, Special Surveys Division.


The Survey of Work Arrangements was conducted by Statistics Canada in November 1995 with the cooperation and support of Human Resources Development Canada. This manual has been produced to facilitate the manipulation of the microdata file of the survey results.

The need for information on work arrangements such as work schedules, flextime and home-based work was behind the 1991 Survey of Work Arrangements - the first national survey covering these issues. An interest in changes in work arrangements, as well as a need for data on other aspects of working conditions led to the 1995 Survey of Work Arrangements. Both surveys were conducted as supplements to the Labour Force Survey (LFS).


URL: http://www.statcan.ca/english/Dli/Metadata/was/1995/was95gid.pdf
KEY WORDS: Employment Surveys; Social Surveys; Canada; Paid work; Type of work; Occupations; Hours of Labor; Flexible Hours of Labor; Shift Systems; Home Labor; Temporary Employment; Labor market; Self-employment; Employment; Seasonal Employment; Employment Benefits; Income; Self-Employment; Income.

Statistics Canada. (1997). Survey of 1995 graduates who moved to the United States (SGMUS). Ottawa: Statistics Canada.


The Survey of 1995 Graduates Who Moved to the United States (SGMUS) was commissioned by Human Resources Development Canada (HDRC) and conducted by Statistics Canada. The purpose of this survey was to collect information on the work and education experiences of 1995 postsecondary graduates who were living in the United States in 1997, and the factors that attracted them to the United States.

The target population consisted of graduates of Canadian post-secondary institutions who received their certificate, diploma or degree, or completed their requirements in 1995 and had moved to the United States by the summer of 1997. Excluded were: those who were exclusively American citizens who had been studying in Canada and who had returned home to the U.S.; those who were not living in Canada or in the U.S. at the time of the survey; and graduates who may have moved to the U.S. but returned to Canada before the summer of 1997.


URL: http://www.statcan.ca/cgi-bin/imdb/p2SV.pl?Function=getSurvey& SDDS= 4436 &lang = en&db=IMDB&dbg=f&adm=8&dis=2
KEY WORDS: Employment Surveys; Canada; College Graduates; Employment; Business and Education; Labor mobility; Migration.

Statistics Canada. (2001). Participation and activity limitation survey. Ottawa: Statistics Canada.


The 2001 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS) is a post-censal survey of adults with disabilities, including any person whose everyday activities are limited because of a physical condition or health problem.

The survey covers themes such as activity limitations, help with everyday activities, education, employment status, social participation and economic characteristics. Data collected by the survey will be used to plan the services and programs required by persons with disabilities to participate fully in our society. The most recent data collected on persons with disabilities before PALS is from the 1991 Health and Activity Limitation Survey (HALS). In order to better identify the PALS target population, major changes were made to the structure of the sample and the filter questions identifying persons with disabilities. Therefore, comparisons between the 1986 and 1991 HALS and 2001 PALS surveys are not possible. On the other hand, these filter questions can now serve as a standard for identifying persons with disabilities in other Statistics Canada surveys. The PALS survey population consisted of all persons who reported disabilities in response to the Census questions on activity limitations and who were living in Canada at the time of the Census. Interviews were conducted over the telephone by interviewers completing a paper-and-pencil questionnaire. Interviews by proxy were allowed. In some special cases, face-to-face interviews were conducted. Data collection began in September 2001 and continued until January 2002. The reference period varied depending on the question asked, e.g., the past week, the past six months, the past year or the past five years.


URL: http://www.statcan.ca/english/Dli/Data/Ftp/pals.htm
KEY WORDS: Household Surveys; Social Surveys; Canada; Activity Limitations; Survey Methodology; Household Characteristics; Educational Attainment; Labour Force Status; Employment; Salaries and Wages; Income.

Statistics Canada. (2002). Public service employee opinion survey (PSES). Ottawa: Statistics Canada.


The fundamental objective of the 2002 Public Service Employee Opinion Survey (PSES) was to seek employee opinion on a variety of issues related to organizational effectiveness, workplace well-being and service delivery. The 2002 PSES was designed to enable departments and agencies to identify areas where the Public Service is doing well and point to other areas where improvement is still needed. In addition to making it possible for new employees to provide their perspectives on the workplace, the survey ensures a measurement capacity between the 1999 and 2002 questionnaires. The survey solicited views of Public Service employees on their work environment and overall job satisfaction. Employees expressed their opinions on their work unit, their communication with their supervisor, skills and career aspirations, client services and labour management relations. General information such as age, gender, years of service and province of work were collected and questions were asked on specific themes such as staffing fairness, official languages, health and safety, harassment and discrimination, and retention issues.

The Public Service Employee Survey (PSES) was administered in May and June of 2002 to all employees in the Public Service for which Treasury Board is the employer. The survey was a census. Each member of the target audience received a paper questionnaire to complete. The survey was anonymous; that is, the respondent's name or other identification was not required on the questionnaire.


URL: http://www.statcan.ca/english/Dli/Metadata/pses/2002/pses2002gid.pdf
KEY WORDS: Employment Surveys; Employees Attitudes; Labour Relations; Work Experience; Communication in Personnel Management.

Statistics Canada. (2003). Household internet use survey. Ottawa: Special Surveys Division, Statistics Canada.


The Household Internet Use Survey is being conducted by Statistics Canada on behalf of Industry Canada. The information from this survey will assist the Science and Technology Redesign Project at Statistics Canada to fulfill a three-year contractual agreement between them and the Telecommunications and Policy Branch of Industry Canada. The Household Internet Use Survey is a voluntary survey. It will provide information on the use of computers for communication purposes, and households' access and use of the Internet from home.

The objective of this survey is to measure the demand for telecommunications services by Canadian households. To assess the demand, the authors measure the frequency and intensity of use of the internet. This was done by asking questions relating to the accessibility of the internet to Canadian households both at home, the workplace and a number of other locations. The information collected will be used to update and expand upon previous studies done by Statistics Canada on the topic of the Information Highway. Among other things, the 2003 survey results showed that after surging during the late 1990s, the growth in Internet use among Canadian households has levelled off. However, growth rates remained relatively stable largely because the majority of households were already plugged in, an estimated 7.9 million (64%) of the 12.3 million Canadian households had at least one member who used the Internet regularly in 2003, either from home, work, school, a public library or another location.


URL: http://www.statcan.ca/english/Dli/Metadata/hius/2003/hius2003gid.pdf
KEY WORDS: Household Surveys; Social surveys; Canada; Internet; Households; Information Highway; Survey Methodology; Computers; Personal Computers; Internet use.

Statistics Canada. (2004). Information and communications technologies in schools survey (ICTSS). Ottawa: Statistics Canada.


The Information and Communications Technologies in Schools Survey (ICTSS) collects data on the infrastructure, reach and some usage patterns of information and communications technologies in all elementary and secondary schools in Canada. The main purpose of this survey is to obtain critical benchmark data on the integration of ICT in education. The Information and Communications Technologies in Schools Survey (ICTSS) collects data on the infrastructure, reach and use of information and communications technologies in all elementary and secondary schools in Canada.

The survey was sponsored by Industry Canada's SchoolNet program which works with Canadian learning partners to increase access to and integration of ICT into the learning environment in order to develop an ICT-skilled population, capable of participating in the knowledge economy. Support to the initiative has been provided by the Library and Archives Canada. The survey asked a variety of questions about the reach, use, infrastructure and outcomes of ICT being used in schools. The main topics include:

- the current ICT infrastructure in the school;

- information about the time when students can access computers;

- information about the location of computers in the school;

- the types of internet and intranet connections;

- teacher skills and training in ICT;

- capabilities in regards to online courses and videoconferencing;

- attitudes toward ICT;

- challenges encountered in using ICT.


URL: http://www.statcan.ca/cgi-bin/imdb/p2SV.pl?Function=getSurvey&SDDS =5051& lang =en&db=IMDB&dbg=f&adm=8&dis=2
KEY WORDS: Information and Communications Technologies; Public Education; Elementary Schools; Secondary Schools: Surveys; Canada.
Statistics Canada. (2006). Participation and activity limitation survey (PALS). Ottawa, ON: Statistics Canada.
Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS) is a post-census survey that uses the census as a sampling frame to identify its target population. The Health and Activity Limitation Survey was conducted by Statistics Canada focused on persons with disabilities in 1986 and 1991. In 2001 the Health and Activity Limitation Survey was renamed the Participation and Activity Limitation Survey. The new name reflected the fact that the new survey would focus on the participation of persons with activity limitations. The data collected by the survey are used to plan services and programs required by persons with disabilities to participate fully in our society. PALS is funded by Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC).
KEY WORDS: Questionnaire; Adults; Children; Activity Limitation; Health Problem; Questionnaire; Data Sources; Methodology; Disability; Equity and Inclusion; Health; Society and Community; Canada.

Statistics Canada, & Canadian Council on Learning. (2007). Survey of Canadian attitudes toward learning (SCAL). Ottawa, ON: Statistics Canada.


The Survey of Canadian Attitudes toward Learning (SCAL) provides a unique opportunity to gauge the opinions, perceptions and beliefs of Canadians regarding various aspects of learning in Canada. Now in its second year, the survey was designed by the Canadian Council on Learning (CCL) in consultation with Statistics Canada, which administered the survey on behalf of CCL. SCAL data were collected in May and June 2007. Results are based on telephone interviews with 5,361 Canadians. All respondents had previously participated in Statistics Canada's Labour Force Survey or the Canadian Community Health Survey.
KEY WORDS: Learning; Attitudes; Opinions; Perceptions; Beliefs; Surveys; Interviews; Canada.


III. Other Canadian Surveys on Learning and Work
New Approaches to Lifelong Learning (NALL)
Livingstone, D. W. (1998). First national survey on informal learning (NALL). Toronto: The National Research Network for New Approaches to Lifelong Learning (NALL), Centre for the Study of Education and Work, OISE/UT.
The first Canadian Survey of informal learning examines the extent of adult learning, the existence of social barriers to education courses, and more effective means of linking informal learning with organized education and work. This study is based on a random sample of 1,562 Canadian adults conducted by the Institute for Social Research at York University between August and November, 1998. Nearly everybody (over 90% of the population) is involved in some form of informal learning activities that they can identify as significant. The survey provides estimates of the amount of time that all Canadians - including those who say they do no informal learning at all - are doing in all four areas (employment, community, household, and general interest). The average number of hours devoted to informal learning activities by all Canadian adults over the past year was around 15 hours per week. This is vastly more time than Canadian adults are spending in organized education courses (an average of about 3 hours per week if we include the entire population.) In summary, the majority of Canadian adults are now actively engaged in extensive informal learning, taking further education and training courses and planning to take still more courses.
URL: www.nall.ca.
KEY WORDS: Canada; Informal Learning; Underemployment; Employment; Labor supply; Educattional Attainment, Job Requirements; Effect of Education.

Livingstone, D. W. (1999). Exploring the icebergs of adult learning: Findings of the first Canadian survey of informal learning practices. Canadian Journal for the Study of Adult Education, 13(2), 49-72.


This paper provides empirical estimates of the extent and distribution of self-reported learning activities in the current Canadian adult population, based on a recent country-wide survey, and briefly addresses some implications of these adult learning patterns. The basic finding from the survey is that most Canadian adults are spending a great deal and increasing amount of time in learning activities, most of this in informal learning on their own. The major implications are that Canada is already and increasingly a knowledge society in any reasonable sense of the term and that Canadian adults' mostly informal learning practices should be taken into account more explicitly when shaping educational, economic and other social policies; adult educators should take this detectable informal learning into greater account to develop more responsive further education opportunities.

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