Materials for Teaching, Research and Policy Making



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KEY WORDS: Data Capture; Data Collection; Data Editing; Data Processing; Data Quality; Dictionaries; Handbooks; Industries; Interviews; Labour Force Survey; Provincial Differences; Questionnaires; Sampling and Weighting; Survey Methodology; Survey Sampling; Surveys.

Statistics Canada. (2006). Improvements in 2006 to the Labour Force Survey (LFS). Catalogue no. 71F0031XIE2006003. Ottawa: Statistics Canada.


This paper introduces and explains modifications made to the Labour Force Survey estimates in January 2006. Some of these modifications include changes to the population estimates, improvements to the public and private sector estimates and historical updates to several small Census Agglomerations (CA).
URL: http://www.statcan.ca/bsolc/english/bsolc?catno=71F0031X2006003
KEY WORDS: Demographic Characteristics; Estimation Methods; Labour Force Characteristics; Labour Force Survey; Population Estimates.

Statistics Canada. (2006). The Canadian Labour Market at a Glance. Catalogue no. 71-222-XWE. Ottawa: Statistics Canada.


This new online publication provides an overview of a host of labour market topics, illustrated by charts. Among these topics: labour market trends; employment by industry; trends in workplace training; reasons workers select part-time jobs; absenteeism rates; wages and income; international comparisons; labour markets in provinces and census metropolitan areas; and the labour market for immigrants and Aboriginal people. The first issue of The Canadian Labour Market at a Glance is available from the Statistics Canada website, Our products and services page, under Browse our Internet publications, choose Free, then Labour, then The Canadian Labour Market at a Glance.
URL: http://www.statcan.ca/english/freepub/71-222-XIE/71-222-XIE2006001.pdf
KEY WORDS: Aboriginal Peoples; Aging Population; Analytical Products; Earnings; Educational Attainment; Employment; Employment Benefits; Employment Growth; Employment Insurance; Flexible Working Arrangements; Full Time Employment; Hours Worked; Immigrants; Labour Market; Male Female Income Gap; Multiple Jobholders; Occupations; On-the-Job Training; Part-time Employment; Retail Trade; Retirement; Salaries and Wages; Self Employment; Temporary Employment; Type of Work; Unemployment; Unionization Rates; Wage Inequality; Work Arrangements; Work at Home; Working Mothers; Young Adults.

II. Other Statistics Canada Canadian Surveys
National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY)
Statistics Canada and HRDC. (1999). National longitudinal survey of children & youth (NLSCY). Overview of survey instruments for 1998-99. Ottawa: Statistics Canada.
The National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) is a long-term study conducted in partnership by Human Resources Development Canada (HRDC) and Statistics Canada. The primary objective of the NLSCY is to monitor the development and well-being of Canada's children as they grow from infancy to adulthood. The NLSCY is designed to follow a representative sample of Canadian children, aged newborn to 11 years, into adulthood, with data collection occurring at two-year intervals. The first collection of information (cycle 1) took place in the winter and spring of 1994-95 and the second (cycle 2) in the winter and spring of 1996-97. Collection of cycle 3 began in the fall of 1998 and was carried until June 1999. In addition to the original sample of children, who were aged 2 to 13 years at the time of the second data collection, a new sample of newborn and 1-year-old children was added to cycle 3 to allow for cross-sectional estimates. An extra cross-sectional sample of children 5 years old was also added to allow some provincial estimates for that age group.
URL: http://www.statcan.ca/english/freepub/89F0078XIE/99003.pdf
KEY WORDS: Social Surveys; Canada; Longitudinal Studies; Health surveys; Family; Children; Youth; Single Parents; Child Development; Social Conditions.

Statistics Canada. (1999). National longitudinal survey of children & youth Cycle 3 survey instruments 1998-99 (Vol. 2). Ottawa: Statistics Canada and Human Resources Development Canada.


This is the second in a set of two documents containing the NLSCY cycle 3 instruments, the various questionnaires used to gather information from parents, children and youth, teachers and principals. This document includes the teacher, principal and youth self-complete questionnaires only; the parent questionnaires can be found in Book 1. The questions used in Cycle 3 are quite similar to those used in Cycle 1 and 2; the reader may also wish to refer to the Cycle 1 and 2 documentation.
URL: http://www.statcan.ca/english/freepub/89F0077XIE/cyc3-bk2.pdf
KEY WORDS: Social Surveys; Canada; Longitudinal Studies; Health surveys; Family; Children; Youth; Single Parents; Child Development; Social Conditions.

National Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating (NSGVP/CSGVP)


Statistics Canada. (2001). 2000 National Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating. Ottawa: Statistics Canada, Special Surveys Division.
Each CD-ROM includes a micro-data file and related documentation for the 2000 National Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating (NSGVP). The survey asks Canadians 15 years of age and over about the ways in which they support one another and their communities through their involvement in giving, volunteering and participating. The survey, given its scale, provides the most comprehensive assessment of giving, volunteering and participating ever undertaken in Canada or, to the best of our knowledge, in the world. The 2000 survey replicates the 1997 survey and enables us to begin to track both changes in contributory behaviours and in the characteristics of those Canadians making contributions. Any trend in these behaviours has important implications for Canadian society.
KEY WORDS: Voluntarism; Charities; Social Participation; Canada; Charitable Donations; Charitable Organizations; Confidentiality; Culture; Data Collection; Data Editing; Data Processing; Data Quality; Donations; Education; Employment; Environment; Estimation Methods; Handbooks; Health; Health Care Institutions; Housing; Interviews; Labour Force Status; Labour Force Survey; Law; Non-response Rate; Occupations; Recreation; Religion; Sampling and Weighting; Social Services; Social Surveys; Survey Methodology; Survey Sampling; Surveys; Unemployed Persons; Unemployment; User Guides; Volunteer Work; Volunteers; Volunteer Work.

Statistics Canada. (2001). Microdata user guide: National survey of giving, volunteering and participating, 2000. Ottawa: Statistics Canada.


The National Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating (NSGVP) is one component of the Voluntary Sector Initiative, a collaborative program of the federal government and the voluntary sector. The 2000 NSGVP was conducted by Statistics Canada in October, November and early December of 2000 on behalf of the Voluntary Sector Initiative and in partnership with federal policy departments and voluntary organizations. This manual has been produced to facilitate the manipulation of the microdata file of the survey results.

The content of the 2000 NSGVP and its methodology are, for the most part, identical to that of the 1997 Survey. The 2000 survey is based on a representative sample of 14,724 Canadians aged 15 and over who were asked how they gave money and other resources to individuals and to organizations, volunteered time to help others and to enhance their communities, and participated in the practices of active citizenship. The survey, given its scale, provides the most comprehensive assessment of giving, volunteering and participating ever undertaken in Canada or, to the best of our knowledge, in the world. The 2000 survey replicates the 1997 survey and enables us to begin to track both changes in contributory behaviours and changes in the characteristics of those Canadians making contributions. Any trend in these behaviours has important implications for Canadian society. The results from the survey allow this report to paint a portrait of the ways Canadians contribute to society through their monetary and voluntary support of others.


URL: http://prod.library.utoronto.ca/datalib/codebooks/cstdli/nsgvp/2000/nsgvp00gid.pdf
KEY WORDS: Household Surveys; Canada, Voluntarism; Charities; Social Participation.

Statistics Canada. (2001). Questionnaire: 2000 national survey of giving, volunteering and participating (NSGVP). Ottawa: Statistics Canada.


This survey deals with unpaid volunteer activities, charitable giving and civic participation. The survey results will help build a better understanding of these activities which can in turn be used to develop programs and services to support them.
URL: http://prod.library.utoronto.ca/datalib/codebooks/cstdli/nsgvp/2000/nsgvp00que.pdf
KEY WORDS: Household Surveys; Canada, Voluntarism; Charities; Social Participation.

Statistics Canada. (2004). Canada survey of giving, volunteering and participating (CSGVP). Ottawa: Statistics Canada.


The purpose of this survey is to collect data regarding unpaid volunteer activities, charitable giving and participation. The results will help build a better understanding of these activities which can in turn be used to help develop programs and services.

The Canada Survey on Giving, Volunteering and Participating (CSGVP) is the result of a partnership of federal government departments and voluntary sector organizations that includes Imagine Canada, Canadian Heritage, Health Canada, Human Resources and Social Development Canada, the Public Health Agency of Canada, Statistics Canada and Volunteer Canada. This survey is an important source of information on Canadian contributory behaviour, including giving, volunteering and participating.

The objectives of the CSGVP are threefold:

1) to collect national data to fill a void of information about individual contributory behaviours including volunteering, charitable giving and participation;

2) to provide reliable and timely data to the System of National Accounts; and

3) to inform both the public and voluntary sectors in policy and program decisions that relate to the charitable and volunteer sector.


URL: http://www.statcan.ca/cgi-bin/imdb/p2SV.pl?Function=getSurvey&SDDS=4430& lang= en&db=IMDB&dbg=f&adm=8&dis=2
KEY WORDS: Household Surveys; Canada, Voluntarism; Charities; Social Participation.

Hall, M., Lasby, D., Gumulka, G., & Tryon, C. (2006). Caring Canadians, involved Canadians: Highlights from the 2004 Canada survey of giving, volunteering and participating. Ottawa: Statistics Canada.


The Canada Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating (CSGVP) offers a unique opportunity to examine a constellation of activities in which millions of people engage, and that are at the heart of Canadian life. Every day in communities across our country, Canadians donate their time and money to charities and other nonprofit organizations, help their neighbours, friends and family, and connect with one another through their community groups.

This report presents highlights of the findings of the 2004 CSGVP. It reveals the enormous range of giving, volunteering and participating that occurs throughout Canada over the course of a year. Canadians donate money and volunteer time to support the arts, local sports clubs, medical research, food banks, shelters, international relief efforts, and their places of worship, among many other causes. They help their neighbours and friends in a variety of ways, by doing work around their homes, doing shopping or driving people to appointments, or providing health-related or personal care.

The 2004 CSGVP provides a new way of measuring giving, volunteering and participating. It replaces the way these behaviours were measured in the 1997 and 2000 National Surveys of Giving, Volunteering and Participating (NSGVPs). Because of these changes it is not appropriate to compare results from the 2004 CSGVP with the previous NSGVP surveys.
KEY WORDS: Household Surveys; Canada, Voluntarism; Charities; Social Participation.

Survey of Labour Income Dynamics (SLID)


Sauvé J. et al, (2001). Survey of labour and income dynamics. Income interview questionnaire, May 2000. Ottawa: Statistics Canada.
In May 2000 the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics collected data on income for the seventh consecutive year. Respondents had the option of answering the questions on income in an interview, or giving permission to Statistics Canada to allow SLID to use the information from their income tax return. The 2000 Income interview was conducted only for persons aged 16 years or over on January 1, 2000. Cohabitants (new members) identified in the January interview were questioned about their 1999 income (if they were 16 or over). New cohabitants were not identified during the May 2000 interview. They will be identified in the January 2001 Labour interview and questioned in May 2001 about their 2000 income. This research paper presents the content of the Income interview including question wording, possible responses and flows of questions.
URL: http://www.statcan.ca/english/research/75F0002MIE/75F0002MIE2000014.pdf
KEY WORDS: Household Surveys; Social Surveys; Canada; Labor Supply; Survey Methodology; Questionnaires; Marital Status; Mother Tongue; Ethnic Origin; Immigrant Status; Household Characteristics; Educational Attainment; Labour Force Status; Employment; Salaries and Wages; Income.

Sauvé J. et al, (2001). Survey of labour and income dynamics. Labour interview questionnaire, January 2000. Ottawa: Statistics Canada.


Every January, the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) Labour interview is conducted using computer-assisted interviewing (CAI). CAI is paperless interviewing. This document is therefore a written approximation of the CAI interview, or the questionnaire. The CAI process is as follows: (a) A question appearing on the computer screen is read aloud to the respondent. (b) The respondent's answer is directly entered by the interviewer. (c) Based on the answer given, and/or age or other flow criterion, the computer determines the next question to be asked and displays it on the screen. This research paper presents the content of the Labour interview, including question wording, possible responses, and flows of questions.
URL: http://www.statcan.ca/english/research/75F0002MIE/75F0002MIE2000015.pdf
KEY WORDS: Household Surveys; Social Surveys; Canada; Labor Supply; Survey Methodology; Questionnaires; Marital Status; Mother Tongue; Ethnic Origin; Immigrant Status; Household Characteristics; Educational Attainment; Labour Force Status; Employment; Salaries and Wages; Income.

Sauvé, J., Lutz, D., & Hiltz, A. (2001). Survey of labour and income dynamics. Entry exit component for labour interview. January 2000. Ottawa: Statistics Canada.


Each January, the Labour interview for the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) is conducted. Then, in May, SLID income data is collected. Both use computer-assisted interviewing (CAI) for data collection. The questions particular to each interview are preceded by different versions of the Entry Exit component. In Appendix 2, figures 1 and 2 present an overview of the flow of the interview and the flow of the Entry Exit component, respectively.

A new panel of approximately 17,000 households was added to SLID in January 2000, making a total sample of about 33,500 households. Panel 3 was selected from two rotation groups of the Labour Force Survey (LFS) of January 1999. Some information, such as names, sex, date of birth, address and telephone number, was carried over from the LFS. SLID collects marital status and household relationships in a different way than the LFS so in the Demographics module all Panel 3 respondents are asked these questions. For continuing (Panel 2) respondents, marital status is confirmed, but the other questions are asked only if values are missing or if there has been a change in relationships.


URL: http://www.statcan.ca/english/research/75F0002MIE/75F0002MIE2000013.pdf

URL: http://www.statcan.ca/english/research/75F0002MIE/75F0002MIE2000012.pdf


KEY WORDS: Household Surveys; Social Surveys; Canada; Labor Supply; Survey Methodology; Questionnaires; Marital Status; Mother Tongue; Ethnic Origin; Immigrant Status; Household Characteristics; Educational Attainment; Labour Force Status; Employment; Salaries and Wages; Income

Workplace and Employee Survey (WES).


Statistics Canada. (1998). The evolving workplace: Findings from the pilot workplace and employee survey. Catalogue no.:71-583-XPE. Ottawa: Statistics Canada.
This overview report provides the first data from a new pilot survey recently conducted by Statistics Canada for Human Resources Development Canada. This survey, called the "Workplace and Employee Survey" (WES) and developed jointly by the two agencies represents the first attempt in Canada at conducting a large-scale linked employer-employee survey. The survey consists of two components: (1) an establishment survey on the adoption of technologies, organizational change, training and other human resource practices, business strategies, and labour turnover in the establishment; and (2) a survey of workers within these same establishments to obtain data on their wages, hours of work, job type, human capital, other characteristics, use of technologies, and training taken. This data source provides, for the first time in Canada, detailed linked micro-data on establishments and their workers.
KEY WORDS: Downsizing; High Technology; Human Capital; Organizational Change; Training; Workplace.

Statistics Canada. (1999). Workplace and employee survey. Compendium 1999 data. Catalogue no. 71-585-XIE. Ottawa: Statistics Canada.


This survey consists of two components: (1) a workplace survey on the adoption of technologies, organizational change, training and other human resource practices, business strategies, and labour turnover in workplaces; and (2) a survey of employees within these same workplaces covering wages, hours of work, job type, human capital, use of technologies and training. It provides data from the new Workplace and Employee Survey (WES) conducted by Statistics Canada with the support of Human Resources Development Canada. The result is a rich new source of linked information on workplaces and their employees (From Introduction).
URL: http://www.statcan.ca/english/freepub/71-585-XIE/71-585-XIE99001.pdf
KEY WORDS: Employment Surveys; Education Surveys; Canada; Employees; Employers; Employment Training; Hiring; Information and Communication; Technologies; Information Technology; Occupations; Employees; Work Environment; Industrial Organization; Labor Relations; Labor Market; Job Vacancies; Business Administration, Management; Income.

Statistics Canada. (2001). Workplace and employee survey. Employee Survey. Ottawa: Statistics Canada.


In exactly the same fashion as the "employer" survey, the "employee" version of The Workplace and Employee Survey provides valuable information on the "business of business" by looking at the practices that help firms succeed. It polled Canadian employees and employers on a range of workplace concerns such as "Workforce Characteristics and Job Organization", "Separations" (i.e. the number of employees who have left the organization for various reasons), etc. Survey results provide a unique insight into the relationship between employment practices and firms' performance, as well as more in-depth information on the effect of technology, training and human resource practices.
URL: http://www.statcan.ca/english/concepts/2001wes1.pdf
KEY WORDS: Employment Surveys; Education Surveys; Canada; Employees; Employers; Employment Training; Hiring; Information and Communication; Technologies; Information Technology; Occupations; Employees; Work Environment; Industrial Organization; Labor Relations; Labor Market; Job Vacancies; Business Administration, Management; Economic Aspects; Income.

Statistics Canada. (2002). Workplace and employee survey. Employer Survey. Ottawa: Statistics Canada.


The Workplace and Employee Survey provides valuable information on the "business of business" by looking at the practices that help firms succeed. It polled Canadian employees and employers on a range of workplace concerns such as "Determine end of previous job and current labour market status", "New employer content", etc. Survey results provide a unique insight into the relationship between employment practices and firms' performance, as well as more in-depth information on the effect of technology, training and human resource practices.
URL: http://www.statcan.ca/english/concepts/2002wes2.pdf
KEY WORDS: Employment Surveys; Education Surveys; Canada; Employees; Employers; Employment Training; Hiring; Information and Communication; Technologies; Information Technology; Occupations; Employees; Work Environment; Industrial Organization; Labor Relations; Labor Market; Job Vacancies; Business Administration, Management; Economic Aspects; Income.

Statistics Canada. (2003). Guide to the analysis of the workplace and employee survey. Catalogue no.: 71-221-GIE. Ottawa: Statistics Canada.


The Workplace and Employee Survey Guide contains a dictionary of concepts and covers topics such as survey methodology, data collection, data processing and data quality. It also contains helpful information for researchers wishing to use the microdata.
URL: http://www.statcan.ca/english/freepub/71-221-GIE/71-221-GIE2005001.pdf
KEY WORDS: Data Analysis; Data Collection; Handbooks; Response Rate; Survey Sampling; Workplace.

Therrien, P., & Léonard, A. (2003). The evolving workplace: Empowering employees: A route to innovation. The Evolving Workplace Series. Catalogue no. 71-584-MIE. Ottawa: Statistics Canada.


This document provides data from the new Workplace and Employee Survey (WES) conducted by Statistics Canada with the support of Human Resources Development Canada. The survey consists of two components: (1) a workplace survey on the adoption of technologies, organizational change, training and other human resource practices, business strategies, and labour turnover in workplaces; and (2) a survey of employees within these same workplaces covering wages, hours of work, job type, human capital, use of technologies and training. The result is a rich new source of linked information on workplaces and their employees. This study shows that HRM practices play a positive and significant role in the innovation performance. This relationship holds when dealing with all industrial sectors as well as with the manufacturing sector only. Moreover, using more HRM practices makes the relationship with innovation stronger. For instance, the predicted probability of being a first-to-the-market innovator is 35% when using more than six HRM practices, 11% when using three or fewer practices, and only 4% if none of these HRM practices are adopted.
URL: http://www.statcan.ca/cgi-bin/downpub/listpub.cgi?catno=71-584-MIE2003008
KEY WORDS: Labour; Information and Communications Technology; Innovation; Technology; Workplace.

Youth in Transition Survey (YITS)


Statistics Canada. (2000). Youth in transition survey: Project overview. Catalogue no. 81-588-XIE. Ottawa: Statistics Canada and Human Resources Development Canada.
The Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) is a longitudinal survey designed to provide policy-relevant information about school-work transitions and factors influencing pathways. YITS will provide vehicle for future research and analysis of major transitions in young people's lives, particularly those between education, training and work. Information obtained from, and research based on, the survey will help clarify the nature and causes of short and long-term challenges young people face in school-work transitions, as well as support policy planning and decision making to help prevent or remedy these problems.

The objectives of the Youth in Transition Survey were developed after an extensive consultation with stakeholders with an interest in youth and school-work transitions. Content includes measurement of major transitions in young people's lives including virtually all formal educational experiences and most labour-market experiences. Factors influencing transitions also include family background, school experiences, achievement, aspirations and expectations, and employment experiences. The implementation plan encompasses a longitudinal survey for each of two age cohorts, to be surveyed every two years. Data from a cohort entering at age 15 will permit analysis of long-term school-work transition patterns. Data from a cohort entering at ages18-20 will provide more immediate, policy-relevant information on young adults in the labour market.


URL: http://www.statcan.ca/english/freepub/81-588-XIE/81-588-XIE.pdf

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