Materials for Teaching, Research and Policy Making



Download 5.22 Mb.
Page11/95
Date17.05.2016
Size5.22 Mb.
1   ...   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   ...   95

KEY WORDS: Employment Surveys; Sweden; Work Environment; Working Conditions; Social Aspects; Public Opinion.

Wikman, A. (2003). Work environment statistics in Sweden. Dublin: European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions.


Working environment surveys have been carried out in Sweden every two years since 1989. Since 1991, the surveys have included questions on work-related health problems. These surveys are designed to provide information against which reported occupational illnesses and injuries can be compared. This information also helps streamline reporting procedures. Findings reveal that work-related stress is on the increase, particularly in certain occupations.

Statistics sources: The 'Work environment survey' has been conducted by the central statistics office, Statistics Sweden (SCB), on a biennial basis since 1989. To date, the results from seven surveys are available, each of which was carried out in a similar manner, focusing on the same issues. Similar material dating from 1984 exists for some issues. For each survey, almost 10,000 people were interviewed. Further details on the methodology of the survey may be found at the end of this report. Another statistical source is the survey of 'Work-related problems' carried out annually by Statistics Sweden since 1991. The respondents are asked to state whether they have difficulties coping with normal housework or routine tasks at work. They are asked to describe the type of difficulties experienced and their causes. This survey does not aim for an exhaustive description of what illnesses are caused by work, but draws out certain basic information against which reported occupational diseases and accidents can be compared.


URL: http://www.fr.eurofound.eu.int/publications/files/EF0418EN.pdf
KEY WORDS: Employment Surveys; Sweden; Work Environment; Working Conditions; Social Aspects; Public Opinion.

Surveys on Work and Learning [United Kingdom]


Department of Trade and Industry. (1997). Work-life balance 2000: Employers screen & main questionnaire. Essex: UK Data Archive, University of Essex.
This study was conducted in conjunction with the Institute for Employment Research at the University of Warwick into how much people work, when they work, and where they work. The survey was undertaken for the Department for Education and Employment. It is designed to speak to people in a wide range of workplaces in order to get a full picture of current employment practices.
URL: http://www.data-archive.ac.uk/doc/4465/mrdoc/word/a4465uba.doc
KEY WORDS: Work-life Balance; Work; Hours of Work; Working Conditions.

DTI. (1998). Workplace employee relations survey, WERS 1998. London: Department of Trade and Industry.


WERS 98 is a national survey of people at work. It follows in the acclaimed footsteps of earlier surveys conducted in 1980, 1984 and 1990. The survey is jointly sponsored by the Department of Trade and Industry, Acas, the Economic and Social Research Council, and the Policy Studies Institute. Its purpose is to provide an account, for all to use, of management-employee relations. For this reason, the survey is supported by leading organisations like the Confederation of British Industry, the Trades Union Congress, and the Institute of Personnel and Development. For those who are familiar with the WERS series, it will be apparent that there have been several major changes made to the survey. This has come about because the sponsors felt that there had been so much irrevocable change since the late 1970s that a recasting of the questionnaire design and the structure of the survey was called for. A full account of the changes that have been made and the reasons behind these changes, can be found in the paper "A survey in transition".
URL: http://www.dti.gov.uk/employment/research-evaluation/wers-98/index.html
KEY WORDS: Employment Surveys; Great Britain; Industrial Relations; Employee Attitude Surveys; Labor supply; Organizational change; Labor Unions.

DfEE. (2000). Work-life balance survey. London: Department for Education and Employment.


In Spring 2000 the UK Government launched its Work-Life Balance Campaign. The campaign aims to raise employers' awareness of the business benefits of introducing policies and practices which help employees obtain a better balance between work and the rest of their lives. The campaign aims to benefit all employees and job seekers, not just those with children or adults to care for. The Baseline Study's aim was to assess the extent to which employers operated work-life balance practices and whether employees felt existing practices met their needs. The current study is based on three questionnaire surveys that directly addressed work-life balance: 1) A representative survey of 2500 employers with five or more employees at the establishment level (the Employer Survey); 2) Interviews with the head offices of 250 establishments that participated in the Employer Survey (the Head Office Survey); 3) A survey of 7500 persons in employment (the Employee Survey).

The surveys covered Great Britain and interviews were conducted by telephone between April and July 2000. The Employee Survey asked questions about the characteristics of the establishment where the respondent worked. This allows the Employer and Employee surveys to be matched with respect to the characteristics of the establishment. For instance, the reports of employees working in manufacturing establishments with 500 or more employees in the Employee Survey can be matched against the responses of employers with these characteristics in the Employer Survey.


URL: www.docep.wa.gov.au/LR/LabourRelations/Media/Work-life_survey.pdf
KEY WORDS: Employment Surveys; Great Britain; Industrial Relations; Employee Attitude Surveys; Labor Supply; Organizational change; Labor Unions.

Department for Education and Skills (DfES). (2002). National adult learning survey (NALS). Nottingham: DfES.


In August 1996, the Department for Education and Employment (DIEE) commissioned Social and Community Planning Research (SCPR) to carry out a survey of people's experiences of and attitudes towards learning. The result of this work led to the 1997 National Adult Learning Survey (NALS). There have been several previous studies investigating participation in adult learning, notably the 1996 NIACE study - 'The Learning Divide' - but they tend to have been more limited in their scope than the 1997 NALS. The purpose of NALS is to gather information about the characteristics, experiences and attitudes of learners and non-learners to underpin the development of future policy and practice in adult education and training. In particular, the 1997 NALS aimed to identify the extent to which people were taking part in different types of learning (both vocational and non-vocational), the cost of doing such learning, people's reasons for doing some learning, problems experienced, perceived benefits of learning and barriers towards taking part in learning.

The NALS is a voluntary household survey, face-to-face interviews with up to two adults in each household. The survey unit is the individual. The survey collected information about respondents' involvement in both taught learning and self-directed learning in the past three years, or since leaving continuous full-time education. Start and end dates are recorded, and whether the episode involved more than 10 hours face to face tuition. More detail is collected about the three most recently taught learning episodes. As with NALS 2000 a one-year reference period is also used. The most important objective of NALS is to estimate the number and characteristics of people taking part in learning of a range of different types.


URL: http://www.statistics.gov.uk/STATBASE/Product.asp?vlnk=2466
KEY WORDS: Educational Surveys; Great Britain; Adult Education; Continuing Education; Non-Learners; Qualifications; Income; Educational Experience.

Fitzgerald, R., Taylor, R., & LaValle, I. (2003). National adult learning survey (NALS) 2002. Research report 415. Nottingham: DfES.


The report presents the results from the National Adult Learning Survey (NALS 2002). It was carried out by the National Centre for Social Research on behalf of the Department for Education and Skills (DfES). It is the fourth survey in the NALS series; the previous surveys were carried out in 2001, 20001 and 1997. The NALS series is used by DfES to evaluate the effectiveness of their adult learning policies. It is also used to monitor progress in meeting the National Learning Target for adult participation.
URL: http://www.dfes.gov.uk/research/data/uploadfiles/RR415.pdf
KEY WORDS: Educational Surveys; Great Britain; Adult Education; Continuing Education; Non-Learners; Qualifications; Income; Educational Experience.

DTI. (2004). Workplace employee relations survey, WERS 2004. London: Department of Trade and Industry.


The 2004 Workplace Employment Relations Survey (WERS 2004) is a national survey of people at work. The survey is jointly sponsored by the Department of Trade and Industry, the Advisory Conciliation and Arbitration Service (Acas), the Economic and Social Research Council and the Policy Studies Institute. It follows in the acclaimed footsteps of earlier surveys conducted in 1980, 1984, 1990 and 1998. The purpose of each survey in the series has been to provide large-scale, statistically reliable evidence about a broad range of industrial relations and employment practices across almost every sector of the economy in Great Britain. This evidence is collected with the following objectives in mind: to provide a mapping of employment relations practices in workplaces across Great Britain; to monitor changes in those practices over time; to both inform policy development and permit an informed assessment of the effects of public policy, and, to bring about a greater understanding of employment relations as well as the labour market. To that end, the survey collects information from: managers with responsibility for employment relations or personnel matters; trade union or employee representatives; and employees themselves.
URL: http://www.dti.gov.uk/employment/research-evaluation/wers-2004/index.html
KEY WORDS: Employment Surveys; Great Britain; Industrial Relations; Employee Attitude Surveys; Labor supply; Organizational change; Labor Unions.

National Centre for Social Research. (2005). British Social Attitudes Survey. London: NCSR. Retrieved November 30, 2006 from http://www.natcen.ac.uk/natcen/pages/or_socialattitudes.htm#bsa.


The British Social Attitudes (BSA) survey series began in 1983, and has been conducted every year since (excepting 1988 and 1992.) The series is designed to produce annual measures of attitudinal movements which will complement large-scale government surveys such as the General Household Survey and the Labour Force Survey. One of its main purposes is to allow the monitoring of patterns of continuity and change, and the examination of the relative rates at which attitudes, in respect of a range of social issues, change over time. The questionnaire usually has two parts, one administered and one for self-completion. Each year the interview questionnaire contains a number of 'core' questions and cover major topic areas such as labour market participation, the economy, defence, and the welfare state. The majority of these questions are repeated in most years. In addition, a wide range of background and classificatory questions is always included. The remaining part of the questionnaire is devoted to a series of questions (modules) on a range of social, economic, political and moral issues - some asked regularly, others less often.
URL: http://www.britsocat.com

URL: http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/03900.xml

URL: http://www.natcen.ac.uk/natcen/pages/or_socialattitudes.htm
KEY WORDS: Attitudes; Economic Conditions; Economic Issues; Education; Gender; Government Spending; Health Care; Income; Labor Markets; National Economy; National Identity; Political Parties; Religious Denominations; Social Attitudes; Social Issues; Social Networks; Transportation; Trends; Values; Welfare; Work Environment; Workplaces.

Snape, D., Tanner, E., Sinclair, R., Michaelson, J., & Finch, S. (2006). National adult learning survey : NALS 2005. Nottingham: DfES.


The National Adult Learning Survey (NALS) series is used by DfES to look at a wide variety of aspects of adult participation in learning. The 2005 survey is the fourth in the NALS series to be published; the previous surveys were carried out in 2002, 2001 and 1997. NALS 2005 was carried out by the National Centre for Social Research on behalf of the DfES. The survey, conducted between October 2005 and February 2006, achieved a 50% response rate and included 4,983 computer-assisted personal interviews with adults aged 16 or over in England, Wales and Scotland. The survey explores a number of questions about a variety of learning experiences in the previous three years or since leaving continuous full-time education as well as questions related to learning among different groups, obstacles and incentives to learning, taught learning and Self-directed learning, use of and attitudes towards ICT, information, advice and guidance (IAG), and awareness of learning campaigns and initiatives.
KEY WORDS: Adult Education; Participation Rate; Continuing Education; Attitudes; Survey; Great Britain.

Hooker, H. l. (2007). Third work-life balance employee survey: Main findings. London: DTI.


The Third Work-Life Balance is the major study among British workplaces with five or more employees. The Third Work-Life Balance (WLB3) Employer Survey was designed with three main aims: (1) To monitor changes since the previous two work-life balance surveys by collecting data on awareness, provision and demand in relation to work-life balance arrangements Also monitored were employers' perceptions of positive benefits and detrimental impacts arising from the provision of these arrangements. (2) To provide a robust baseline for future evaluation in relation to the provisions brought in under the Work and Families Act 2006. (3) To examine other issues which relate to work-life balance, including differences between sub-groups of employees.
KEY WORDS: Work and Family; Government Policy; Flexible Hours of Labor; Quality of Work Life; Employee Attitude Surveys; Great Britain.

Meadows, P., & Metcalf, H. (2007). Evaluation of the impact of skills for life learning: Longitudinal survey of learners. Nottingham: DfES Publications.


The Skills for Life program is designed to improve literacy, numeracy and language skills of adults and of young people (aged 16 to 17) who have left full-time education. As part of the program, literacy, numeracy and ESOL [English for Speakers of Other Languages] training was provided free of charge to those without literacy or numeracy qualifications at Level 2. This report is the third in a series of reports of the evaluation of the impact of participation in a literacy or a numeracy course at a college for a qualification. As such, the evaluation does not assess the full Skills for Life program (notably excluding ESOL courses and courses delivered outside college). The analysis is restricted to those aged 19 and over. The evaluation examines the impact of participation on a range of economic, personal and social outcomes, including employment, health and involvement in one's children's education (at Wave 2 and Wave 3). It also describes course benefits, as perceived by the participants (at Wave 2), factors affecting qualification gain and dropout (at Wave 2) and progression in education and training (at Wave 3).
KEY WORDS: Literacy; Social Surveys; Competency-based Education; Elementary Education of Adults; Vocational Education; Social Skills; Life Skills; Great Britain.

British Educational Communications Technology Agency (BECTA). (2008). Survey of further education (FE) learners and e-learning. Coventry: BECTA.


The research project was commissioned to better understand Information and Communication Technology (ICT) from the Further Education (FE) learner's perspective This study will help to verify some of the key findings from previous institution and practitioner level studies. The main objectives of the research were to assess the following: Learner access to ICT resources within the college and outside (e.g. at home, in the workplace); How learners use/experience ICT and e-learning in their programs of study, and also outside of college (nature and frequency); Learner perceptions of how the use of ICT/e-learning impacts on their learning (and also the extent to which they enjoy this form of learning); Learner estimates of their confidence and competence in using different forms of ICT for particular tasks; Support for ICT provided by the college.

This sample was sourced from the Individualized Learner Records (ILR) which are held by the Learning and Skills Council (LSC). All of the records selected for the sample were 16+ years of age, with a telephone and who had agreed to be re-contacted. The sample was stratified by key variables (type of institution, local LSC region, age, gender, ethnicity, learning difficulty/disability, mode of study and course type) and in total, 18,000 records were selected. The final study was based on 4,000 interviews and analysis of sub-groups such as learners with disabilities, learners with learning difficulties and learners from minority ethnic backgrounds. The survey was conducted via a telephone data collection method and the interview length was 20 minutes. Fieldwork took place between 20 April and 24 May 2007. The data was weighted by key variables (age within gender, sector and mode of study) based on the IRL database to ensure it reflected the FE learner population.


KEY WORDS: Computers in Education; Student Attitudes; Further Education; Surveys.

Surveys on Work and Learning [United States]


BLS. (April 30, 1999). Employment experience and other characteristics of youths: Results from a new longitudinal survey. Washington, DC: Bureau of Labor Statistics of the U.S. Department of Labor.
More than half (57 percent) of youths participate in some type of work activity while age 14, and nearly two-thirds (64 percent) work at some point while age 15, according to a new survey from the Bureau of Labor Statistics of the U.S. Department of Labor. Work, as defined in the survey, can include "employee" jobs, in which youths have an on-going relationship with a particular employer, such as a restaurant or supermarket, and/or "freelance" jobs outside the home, where the youth is doing tasks such as baby-sitting or yard work. These findings are from the first round of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, a nationally representative sample of 9,022 young men and women who were 12 to 16 years of age on December 31, 1996. The survey provides information on employment experiences, schooling, family background, social behavior, and other characteristics.

This release focuses on four aspects of the lives of these youths who were ages 12 to 17 when interviewed in 1997: overall employment, employment while in school, educational experiences, and home characteristics.


URL: www.bls.gov/nls/nlsy97r1.pdf
KEY WORDS: Employment Surveys; Educational Surveys; Household Surveys; United States; Employment.

BLS. (December 7, 2000). Employment experience of youths: Results from a longitudinal survey [NLSY97 round 2]. Washington, DC: Bureau of Labor Statistics of the U.S. Department of Labor.


Working while in school is the norm among older high school students. Nearly three out of every five students (58 percent) who were 16 years old when the 1997-98 school year began worked for an employer at some point during the academic year, according to a survey from the Bureau of Labor Statistics of the U.S. Department of Labor. These are some of the findings from the second round of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, a nationally representative sample of about 9,000 young men and women who were born during the years 1980 to 1984. These respondents were ages 12 to 17 when first interviewed in 1997 and ages 13 to 19 when interviewed a second time in 1998-99. The survey provides information on the employment experiences, schooling, family background, social behavior, and other characteristics of these youths.

This survey focuses on the employment experiences of these youths both during the school year and the summer. The survey divides work into two categories: "employee" jobs, in which youths have an on-going relationship with a particular employer, such as a restaurant or supermarket; and "freelance" jobs, where the youth is doing one or a few tasks for several people but has no "boss." Examples of freelance jobs are babysitting or yard work.

URL: www.bls.gov/nls/nlsy97r2.pdf
KEY WORDS: School-to-work Transition; Employment Surveys; Educational Surveys; United States; Earning; Labour Market Activity.

California Work and Health Survey. (2000). The California work and health survey. San Francisco: Department of Medicine, University of California.


Initiated in 1998 by faculty and staff of the Institute for Health Policy Studies at the University of California, San Francisco, the California Work and Health Survey (CWHS) is a telephone-based, longitudinal survey of California adults. It is conducted by the Field Institute and funded by the California Wellness Foundation.

The survey provides a detailed description of contemporary reality for Californians. It is unique in its extensive coverage of employment status, working conditions, and job loss, and of health status, healthcare access, and health behaviors. The longitudinal design allows for analyses of health outcomes related to one's employment situation, and of employment outcomes for persons with various health conditions.

Three years of the study have now been completed. The baseline data include 1,771 interviews conducted in June 1998. The 1999 interviews, conducted in May & June, include 913 re-interviews, and 1,131 new baseline interviews. Respondents aged 45 - 70 in 1999 also completed a supplemental interview focusing on health and economic issues related to retirement and work in this age group. In 2000, interviews were conducted in May to July and included 1,265 re-interviews and 903 new baseline interviews.
URL: www.medicine.ucsf.edu/programs/cwhs

URL: http://ihps.ucsf.edu/arg/work_health_nexus.pdf


KEY WORDS: Employment Surveys; United States; California; Working Conditions; Stress; Quality of Life; Health.

BLS. (2001). The national longitudinal surveys (NLS) Handbook. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Labor. Bureau of Labor Statistics. National Longitudinal Surveys.


The National Longitudinal Surveys (NLS), sponsored by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), are a set of surveys designed to gather information at multiple points in time on the labor market experiences of six groups of men and women. Each of the six cohorts has been selected to represent all people living in the United States at the initial interview date and born during a given period. This selection allows weighted conclusions to be drawn about the sample group that can be generalized to represent the experiences of the larger population of U.S. residents born during the same period. Sample design procedures ensure that the labor market experiences of blacks, Hispanics, youths, women, and the economically disadvantaged can be examined. The NLS also include surveys of the children born to women who participate in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79). Detailed information is gathered biennially on the child's home environment and cognitive, socioemotional, and physiological development; as they get older, these young adults report on their education, workforce participation, and fertility. This unique set of national surveys offers researchers the opportunity to study large panels of men, women, and children over significant segments of their lives.

Each of the NLS cohorts consists of 5,000 or more original members, some of whom have been surveyed over several decades. Interviews continue with four of the six cohorts, as well as the NLSY79 children and young adults. Table 1.1 summarizes the NLS cohorts, the sizes of the original samples, the span of years over which each group has been interviewed, and the current interview status of each group.


URL: http://www.bls.gov/nls/handbook/nlshndbk.htm

URL: http://www.columbia.edu/acis/eds/dset_guides/nls.html.



Share with your friends:
1   ...   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   ...   95




The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2020
send message

    Main page