Maritime Museum Emergency and Disaster Preparedness and Recovery Manual



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V. D. EMERGENCY EQUIPMENT
While it is impossible to predict most emergencies, adequate supplies and equipment can be assembled beforehand. Often necessity will be the mother of invention. Suggested supplies and equipment include:
3 Generator with fuel to run it

3 Pumps for firefighting and bilge

3 Dock lines (wire, chain, buoys)

3 Shackles, thimbles, cable clamps

3 Come‑alongs, tackles, grip hoists

3 Chafing gear (including old rags, water hose, etc.)

3 Anchors

3 Fenders (tires, camels)

3 Work boat or float (with means to launch it if not kept in the water)

3 Torches (with protective gear,) bolt cutters, axes, pry‑bars, sledge hammers, chain saws

3 Pipe plugs

3 Red Hand (epoxy putty), sheet lead, tube caulking (Boat Life works under water), steel plate, timbers

3 Lights (portable)

3 Tarps, both canvas and reinforced plastic



3 Odds and ends of lumber

3 PFD's (personal flotation devices), hard hats, gloves, adequate footwear

3 Hand‑held VHF radios

3 Marine radios

3 Fire extinguishers

3 Oil spill protection booms, pads, and Speedy Dry

3 Breathing equipment

3 Fire proof clothing


Outside assistance may be neededsalvage and marine construction companies, National Guard, Army Reserve Construction Battalions, USCG divers, shipyards, etc.



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