Major Works Data Sheet Crime and Punishment



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Memorable Quotes

I have chosen several quotes below. The second page of the MWDS should be devoted solely to these quotes. All you need to do is identify the speaker of the quote; you need not explain the significance.




  • “And the more I drink the more I feel it. That’s why I drink too. I try to find sympathy and feeling in drink. . . I drink so that I may suffer twice as much!” And as though in despair he laid his head down on the table. (Part I, Chapter 2)

  • “At six o’clock I saw Sonya get up, put on her kerchief and her cape, and go out of the room and about nine o’clock she came back. She walked straight up to Katerina Ivanovna and she laid thirty roubles on the table before her in silence. She did not utter a word, she did not even look at her, she simply picked up our big green drap de dames shawl, put it over her head and face and lay down on the bed with her face to the wall; only her little shoulders and her body kept shuddering. . . . And I went on lying there, just as before. . . And then I saw, young man, I saw Katerina Ivanovna, in the same silence go up to Sonia’s little bed; she was on her knees all evening kissing Sonia’s feet, and would not get up, and then they both fell asleep in each other’s arms. . . together, together. . .yes,. . . and I lay drunk. (Part I, Chapter 2)

  • “A hundred thousand good deeds could be done and helped, on that old woman’s money which will be buried in a monastery! Hundreds, thousands perhaps, might be set on the right path; dozens of families saved from destitution, from ruin, from vice, from the lock hospitals—and all with her money. Kill her, take her money and with the help of it devote oneself to the service of humanity and the common good.” (Part 1, Chapter 6)

  • “Therefore, in acquiring wealth solely and exclusively for myself, I am acquiring so to speak, for all, and helping to bring to pass my neighbour’s getting a little more than a torn coat; and that not from private, personal liberality, but as a consequence of the general advance. The idea is simple, but unhappily it has been a long time reaching us, being hindered by idealism and sentimentality. And yet it would seem to want very little wit to perceive it. . .” (Part 2, Chapter 5)

  • “Polenka, my name is Rodion. Pray sometimes for me, too. ‘And Thy servant Rodion,’ nothing more.” “I’ve done with fancies, imaginary terrors and phantoms! Life is real! Haven’t I lived just now? My life has not yet died with that old woman. The Kingdom of Heaven to her—and now enough, madam, leave me in peace! Now for the reign of reason and light . . . and of will, and of strength. . . and now we will see! (Part 2, Chapter 7)

  • “I only believe in my leading idea that men are in general divided by a law of nature into two categories, inferior (ordinary), that is, to say, material that serves only to reproduce its kind, and men who have the gift or the talent to utter a new word.” (Part 3, Chapter 5)

  • He understood all too well how painful it was for her to betray and unveil all that was her own. He understood that these feelings really were her secret treasure, which she had kept perhaps for years, perhaps from childhood, while she lived with an unhappy father and a distracted stepmother crazed by grief, in the midst of starving children and unseemly abuse and reproaches. (Part 4, Chapter 4)

  • “And it’s not a question of self-sacrifice, it’s simply work, honourable, useful work which is as good as any other and much better than the work of a Raphael and a Pushkin, because it is more useful.” . . . “What do you mean by ‘more honourable’? I don’t understand such expressions to describe human activity. ‘More honourable,’ ‘nobler’—all those are old-fashioned prejudices which I reject. Everything which is of use to mankind is honourable. I only understand one word: useful!” (Part 5, Chapter 1)

  • “That I killed a vile noxious insect, an old pawnbroker woman, of use to no one! . . . Killing her was atonement for forty sins. She was sucking the life out of poor people. Was that a crime? I am not thinking of it and I am not thinking of expiating it, and why are you all rubbing it in on all sides? ‘A crime! A crime!’ Only now I see clearly the imbecility of my cowardice, now that I have decided to face this superfluous disgrace. It’s simply because I am contemptible and have nothing in me that I have decided to, perhaps too for my advantage, as that . . . Porfiry . . . suggested.!” (Part 6, Chapter 7)

  • Whole villages, whole towns and peoples went mad from the infection. All were excited and did not understand one another. Each thought that he alone had the truth and was wretched looking at the others, beat himself on the breast, wept, and wrung his hands. They did not know how to judge and could not agree what to consider evil and what good; they did not know whom to blame, whom to justify. . . . Only a few men could be saved in the whole world. They were a pure chosen people, destined to found a new race and a new life, to renew and purify the earth, but no one had seen these men, no one had heard their words and their voices.” (Epilogue, Chapter 2)

  • They wanted to speak, but could not; tears stood in their eyes. They were both pale and thin; but those sick pale faces were bright with the dawn of a new future, of a full resurrection into a new life. They were renewed by love; the heart of each held infinite sources of life for the heart of the other. (Epilogue, Chapter 2)





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