Magna carta in the age of the american and french revolutions



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The Federalist Papers, no. 84 (July-August 1788).

79 Quoted in A.E. Dick Howard, The Road from Runnymede, p. 234.

80 Ibid., pp. 230-231.

81 Proceedings and debates of the Convention of North-Carolina … for the purpose of deliberating and determining the Constitution (Edenton, NC, 1789), p. 86.

82 David Ramsay, An Oration, delivered on the anniversary of American independence, July 4, 1794 … to the inhabitants of Charleston (London, 1795), p. 18.

83 Magna Carta and its Modern Legacy, ed. Robert Hazell and James Melton, p. 13.

84 A.E. Dick Howard, The Road from Runnymede, pp. 232-233.

85 Gordon S. Wood, ‘The Origins of the Bill of Rights’, Proceedings of the American Antiquarian Society, 101 (1991), 255-274.

86 Magna Carta and its Modern Legacy, ed. Robert Hazell and James Melton, pp. 10-11; and Magna Carta, Religion and the Rule of Law, ed. Robin Griffith-Jones and Mark Hill (Cambridge, 2015), pp. 93-96 and 139.

87 Magna Carta and the Rule of Law, ed. Daniel Barstow Magraw et al., pp. 70-73, 94-96; H.D. Hazeltine, ‘The Influence of Magna Carta on American Constitutional Development’, Columbia Law Review, 17 (1917), 26-33; Joyce Lee Malcolm in Magna Carta: The Foundation of Freedom 1215-2015, ed. Nicholas Vincent, p. 135.

88 A.E. Dick Howard, The Road from Runnymede, pp. 276-280.

89 Magna Carta and the Rule of Law, ed. Daniel Barstow Magraw et al., pp. 111-140.

90 James Thomson, The Rise, Progress, and Consequences, of the New Opinions and Principles lately introduced into France; with observations (Edinburgh, 1799), pp. 12-15.

91 The Corner Stone of the British Constitution; Or, the Golden Passage in the Great Charter of England (London, 1789), pp. 2-16; and The Birthright of Britons: Or the British Constitution, with a Sketch of its History (London, 1792), pp. 20, 30-41.

92 Edmund Burke, ‘Letter to Sir Hercules Langrishe’ (1792), in The Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke, Vol IX: The Revolutionary War 1794-1797 and Ireland, ed. R.B. McDowell (Oxford, 1991), p. 611.

93 Henry Maddock, The Power of Parliaments, considered, in a letter to a Member of Parliament (London, 1799), p. 25.

94 The Proceedings of the Parliament of Ireland 1793 (Dublin, 1793), p. 296.

95 John Gifford (1758-1818) was the editor and chief contributor to the monthly Anti-Jacobin Review from 1798 until his death. He was born John Richards Green.

96 John Gifford, The History of England from the earliest times to the peace of 1783 (2 vols., London, 1790), I, 292, 297.

97 John Butler, Brief Reflections upon the Liberty of the British Subject (Canterbury, 1792), in The Political Writings of the 1790s, ed. Gregory Claeys (8 vols., London, 1995), III, 369.

98 The Genuine Trial of Thomas Paine, for a libel contained in the second part of Rights of Man (London, 1792), p. 94.

99 An Abstract of the History and Proceedings of the Revolution Society in London (London, 1789), p. 3.

100 The Address published by the London Corresponding Society at the General Meeting held at the Globe tavern, Strand, on Monday the 20th day of January 1794 (London, 1794), pp. 4-5.

101 The Trial of Maurice Margarot, delegate from London, to the British Convention (Edinburgh, 1794), p. 58.

102 John Thelwall, The Natural and Constitutional Right of Britons to Annual Parliaments, Universal Suffrage, and the Freedom of Popular Association (London, 1795), p. 69.

103 Thomas Paine, Rights of Man; Part the Second (1st edn., London, 1792), pp. 51-52.

104 T.H.B. Oldfield, An Entire and Complete History, Political and Personal, of the Boroughs of Great Britain (3 vols., London, 1792), I, 130. For a similar attack on the limited benefits of Magna Carta, see An Englishman’s Advice to his Countrymen, on the present state of their general interests and prosperity under their good old constitution (London, 1798), pp. 5-6.

105 Charles Pigott, A Political Dictionary: explaining the true meaning of words (London, 1795), p. 72, where he offers an ironic definition of Magna Carta.

106 Letters on Parliamentary Reform, containing a short review of the origin and constitution of parliaments (London, 1793), pp. 15, 47; The Genuine Trial of Thomas Paine, for a libel contained in the second part of Rights of Man (London, 1792), pp. 93-94; and Daniel Isaac Eaton, Politics for the People (2 vols., London, 1794-95), II, 277.

107 These four graphic prints can be found on the on-line British Museum website of its collection of Prints and Drawings. See note 97 above. In the catalogue of this collection, edited by F.G. Stephens and M. Dorothy George (London, 1870-1954) they are numbered BM 7478, BM 8614, BM 9180 and BM 8264 respectively.

108 This is an illustration of this in Magna Carta: Law, Liberty, Legacy, ed. Claire Breay and Julian Harrison, p. 159.

109 Thomas Spence, The Coin Collector’s Companion (London, 1795), pp. 17-18.

110 For a detailed account of this affair, see Joseph S. Jackson, The Public Career of Sir Francis Burdett: The Years of Radicalism, 1796-1815 (Philadelphia, 1932), pp. 99-148.

111 M. Dorothy George, English Political Caricature 1793-1832: A Study of Opinion and Propaganda (Oxford, 1959), pp. 125-126; and Magna Carta: Law, Liberty, Legacy, ed. Claire Breay and Julian Harrison (London, 2015), pp. 165, 178-180.

112 BM Print 11549. It can be viewed in Magna Carta: Law, Liberty, Legacy, ed. Claire Breay and Julian Harrison, p. 178.

113 BM print 11538.

114 BM print 11540.

115 BM print 11550.

116 The Letter of Sir Francis Burdett to his Constituents; with the Argument used by him in denying the Power of the House of Commons to imprison the People of England (5th edn., London, 1810).

117 Joseph S. Jackson, The Public Career of Sir Francis Burdett, pp. 99-100.




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