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Grade 5

Social Studies

Unit: 04

Lesson: 02



Suggested Duration: 4 Days
¡Llegan los británicos!

Lesson Synopsis:

In this lesson students explore events that led to the American Revolution, and the economic and political issues surrounding them. They look at the time period from 1763–1774 and include the French and Indian War and the Boston Tea Party. Students create an illustrated and annotated timeline of these issues and events. The annotation provides students an opportunity to organize their thoughts about the cause and effect relationships between the events, as well as explain the issues involved.
TEKS:

5.2

History. The student understands how conflict between the American colonies and Great Britain led to American independence. The student is expected to:

5.2A

Identify and analyze the causes and effects of events prior to and during the American Revolution, including the French and Indian War and the Boston Tea Party.


Social Studies Skills TEKS:




5.24

Social studies skills. The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired from a variety of valid sources, including electronic technology. The student is expected to:








5.24A

Differentiate between, locate, and use valid primary and secondary sources such as computer software; interviews; biographies; oral, print, and visual material; documents; and artifacts to acquire information about the United States







5.24B

Analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-and-effect relationships, comparing, contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing, making generalizations and predictions, and drawing inferences and conclusions.







5.24E

Identify the historical context of an event.





Getting Ready for Instruction

Performance Indicator(s):

  • Create an illustrated and annotated timeline of the economic and political issues and events that led to the American Revolution. Provide information about the cause and effect relationships between the events and explain the issues involved. (5.2A; 5.24A, 5.24B, 5.24E).

1C, 2G


Key Understandings and Guiding Questions:

  • Diferentes perspectivas sobre asuntos económicos y políticos con frecuencia llevan a un conflicto.

  • ¿Qué eventos llevaron a la Guerra de Independencia?

  • ¿Qué asuntos económicos y políticos había antes de la Guerra de Independencia?

  • ¿Cuáles diferentes perspectivas sobre esos asuntos tenían las personas?

  • ¿Cómo diferentes perspectivas llevan a conflictos?




Vocabulary of Instruction:

  • perspectiva

  • oportunidad económica

  • deuda

  • proclama

  • impuesto

  • deber

  • representación

  • parlamento

  • traidor

  • boicot

  • leal al rey

  • patriota


Materials:

  • Refer to the Notes for Teacher section for materials.




Attachments:

  • Handout: Graphic Organizer (optional, 1 per group)

  • Handout: Events Leading to the American Revolution (1 per student)

  • Handout: Looping Cards (1 set per group, cut apart and shuffled)

  • Handout: Economic and Political Characteristics (optional for display or distribution)

  • Handout: Political and Economic Chart (1 per student)

  • Teacher Resource: Political and Economic Chart KEY

  • Teacher Resource: PowerPoint: Primary Source Documents Related to Events of the American Revolution (optional)

  • Teacher Resource: Economic and Political Reasons for the Conflict KEY (optional)




Resources and References:

  • Boston Massacre: http://www.gilderlehrman.org/history-by-era/road-revolution/resources/paul-revere%E2%80%99s-engraving-boston-massacre-1770

  • Boston Massacre: http://www.masshist.org/revolution/massacre.php

  • Library of Congress, Revere etching: http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2008661777/




Advance Preparation:

  1. Become familiar with content and procedures for the lesson, including the causes and effects of events prior to and during the American Revolution, including the French and Indian War and the Boston Tea Party.

  2. Refer to the Instructional Focus Document for specific content to include in the lesson.

  3. Select appropriate sections of the textbook and other classroom materials that support the learning for this lesson.

  4. Preview available resources and websites according to district guidelines.

  5. Prepare charts for the “Engage” activity.

  6. Prepare Handout: Looping Cards sets for each group. There are 10 Looping Cards provided. Create more cards or delete cards depending on class size.

  7. Prepare materials and handouts as needed.




Background Information:

Revolution was not what the colonists had in mind. However, as more and more taxes were enacted by Parliament and enforced by intruding British soldiers, freeing themselves from the King and his rules became a necessity.


Getting Ready for Instruction Supplemental Planning Document

Instructors are encouraged to supplement and substitute resources, materials, and activities to differentiate instruction to address the needs of learners. The Exemplar Lessons are one approach to teaching and reaching the Performance Indicators and Specificity in the Instructional Focus Document for this unit. Instructors are encouraged to create original lessons using the Content Creator in the Tools Tab located at the top of the page. All originally authored lessons can be saved in the “My CSCOPE” Tab within the “My Content” area.

Instructional Procedures




Instructional Procedures

Notes for Teacher

ENGAGE – Statements of Rebellion

NOTE: 1 Day = 50 minutes

Suggested Day 1 – 5 minutes

  1. Post chart papers around the room with statements such as the following: Come to a Costume Party at Boston Harbor, Don’t Buy Stamps, We Won’t Pay for Protection, Resist Drinking Tea Today, etc.




  1. Student pairs speculate about what the statements might mean and write their thoughts about the statements on sticky-notes (one sticky note per chart/statement).




  1. Pairs travel around the room and put their thoughts on the appropriate chart paper statement.




  1. Teacher reads their notes aloud and prepares students to learn about the real-life events they are related to. Use words such as

  • We have learned about significant people of the revolutionary war period. Now we are going to learn about some of the events they participated in that led to the American Revolution.




Materials:

  • chart paper with statements written on them

  • sticky notes (several per pair of students)


Purpose:

Build interest and for understanding the American Revolution


TEKS: 5.2A
Instructional Note:

  • Additional background information can be found online at several reliable sources. See Resources and References.

  • Students may (correctly) infer that the posters and statements resemble protest signs.



EXPLORE – Events Leading to War

Suggested Day 1 (continued) – 45 minutes

  1. To remind students of the background for events leading to the Revolution, read again the Teacher Resource: Before the American Revolution (from Lesson 1) or another suitable overview of the events on the road to revolution.




  1. Distribute (or students draw) a graphic organizer on which to gather their information. (If desired, use the Handout: Graphic Organizer. Student groups write the name of their event in the center, leaving room for an illustration at the end of the research time. Then they search to find the facts of the event (Who, What, When, Where, Why/How. Then they draw a picture in the center to represent the event.)




  1. In groups of 4 or fewer (to make at least 7 groups), students research the following events, using the textbook, other library and classroom materials, and appropriate websites:

  • French and Indian War (1754)

  • Proclamation of 1763

  • Quartering Act (1765)

  • Stamp Act (1765)

  • Boston Massacre (1770)

  • Boston Tea Party (1773) (include the Sons of Liberty and the Liberty Tree )

  • First Continental Congress (1774)




  1. Provide access to information on the events that contributed to the American Revolution (textbook, library and classroom materials, appropriate websites, etc.)




  1. In their research, students gather information and facts of the event, including what the colonists thought about the event, and add the information to their graphic organizer.




  1. Teacher circulates, probing with questions, clarifying and correcting information, and adding information as needed.




  1. When finished, student groups post their graphic organizer in chronological order.




  1. Distribute to all students the Handout: Events Leading to the American Revolution.




  1. Student groups present, in order, what they have learned about the events to the rest of the class, using the notes on their posted graphic organizers.




  1. Students take notes from the presentations on the Handout: Events Leading to the American Revolution.




Materials:

  • Teacher Resource: Before the American Revolution from Lesson 1


Attachments:

  • Handout: Graphic Organizer (optional, 1 per group)

  • Handout: Events Leading to the American Revolution (1 per student)


Purpose:

Students build knowledge of events leading to the American Revolution.


TEKS: 5.2A, 5.24B
Instructional Note:

  • Add additional significant events as desired or based on the number of student groups.

  • Provide a variety of resources, including primary resources, for students to use to collect the information needed. Textbooks, books from the LRC, and appropriate websites on the Internet. Consider preparing information packets if Internet is not available.

  • Allow approximately 20 minutes for research and then 2-3 minutes per group to present their information. Adjust times as needed.




EXPLAIN – Gallery Walk and 3-2-1

Suggested Day 2 – 15 minutes

  1. Conduct a gallery walk of the timeline created by the graphic organizers to provide students an opportunity to refresh their memories of learning from Day 1.




  1. As students visit each organizer, they add or adjust information as needed.




  1. Review events leading to the American Revolution by using the Handout: Looping Cards.




  1. Distribute a set of the Handout: Looping Cards to each group. (To use the cards as provided, divide students into groups of 10. Add or subtract events/cards as needed depending on class size.)




  1. Students play the Looping Cards Game to review the order of events.




  1. Revisit the K-H-W-H-L-H chart begun in Lesson 1. Ask questions such as:

  • What are 3 things you have learned?

  • What are 2 questions you have?

  • What 1 event do you find most interesting?




  1. Add information to the chart.




Materials:

  • Students’ completed Handout: Events Leading to the American Revolution from Explore on Day 1


Attachments:

  • Handout: Looping Cards (1 set per group, cut apart and shuffled)


Purpose:

Provide an opportunity for students to solidify their thinking about events leading to the American Revolution


TEKS: 5.2A; 5.24B


EXPLORE – Economic and Political Effects

Suggested Day 2 (continued) – 25 minutes

  1. Review the basic understanding of economic and political characteristics. (If desired, use the Handout: Economic and Political Characteristics, either to display or distribute.)




  1. Students return to their Handout: Events Leading to the American Revolution and consider the political and economic causes and effects of each event, adding information to their Handout: Political and Economic Chart.




  1. Teacher models the first row on the Handout: Political and Economic Chart (model the thought process, a “Think-Aloud,” for students) to build understanding of whether the French and Indian War had political or economic causes and/or political and economic effects.




  1. Student pairs consider the political or economic causes and effects of the events leading to the American Revolution and add information to their Handout: Events Leading to the American Revolution.




  1. Facilitate the discussion to help students understand the cause and effect relationship between the events, and between the events and the Revolution.




  1. Continue the discussion to help students draw conclusions about the economic and political causes and effects. If desired, use the Teacher Resource: Political and Economic Chart KEY.




Materials:

  • Students’ completed Handout: Events Leading to the American Revolution from Explore on Day 1 (if needed)


Attachments:

  • Handout: Economic and Political Characteristics (optional for display or distribution)

  • Handout: Political and Economic Chart (1 per student)

  • Teacher Resource: Political and Economic Chart KEY


Instructional Note:

  • There are 10 Looping Cards provided. Create more cards or delete cards depending on class size.

  • To play the Looping Card Game, begin with the Liberty Tree. Student #1 reads the Who Has section of the card at the bottom. The student with the answer to the Who Has question reads his I Have section first, and then reads his Who Has section. Play continues until the last student asks his Who Has section for which the answer is Liberty Tree.




EXPLAIN

Suggested Day 2 (continued) – 10 minutes

  1. Revisit the K-H-W-H-L-H chart begun in Lesson 1.




  1. Facilitate a discussion where students add information to the chart and use academic language when summarizing what they have learned.







EXPLORE – Primary Source Documents

Suggested Day 3 – 35 minutes

  1. Provide a variety of primary source documents related to the events leading to the American Revolution. If desired, use the Teacher Resource: Primary Source Documents for Events Leading to the American Revolution.




  1. Student pairs examine the documents.




  1. Conduct an analysis of the Boston Massacre etching by Paul Revere.

  • The Historical Relationship strategy. Use a T-chart. On the left side, list the details from the image. On the rights side relate the details to information about the period and events.




  1. Context and analysis information for the Revere etching can be found at:

  • http://www.gilderlehrman.org/history-by-era/road-revolution/resources/paul-revere%E2%80%99s-engraving-boston-massacre-1770 http://www.masshist.org/revolution/doc-viewer.php?item_id=151




Materials:

  • primary source documents related to the events leading to the American Revolution

  • The Revere etching propaganda poster for the Boston Massacre: http://www.gilderlehrman.org/history-by-era/road-revolution/resources/paul-revere%E2%80%99s-engraving-boston-massacre-1770


Attachments:

  • Teacher Resource: PowerPoint: Primary Source Documents for Events Leading to the American Revolution (optional)


Instructional Note:

  • Other suggestions for visual analysis strategies include: 4-quarters, APPARTS, People/Objects/Activities, etc.

  • Another primary source could be used instead of the Revere etching.




EXPLAIN

Suggested Day 3 (continued) – 15 minutes

  1. Revisit the K-H-W-H-L-H chart from Lesson 1 to reinforce learning for this lesson.




  1. Display, again, the chart paper posters from the Day 1 Engage.




  1. Student pairs discuss the statements, relating them to specific events leading to the American Revolution. They use academic language to discuss the causes and effects of events prior to the American Revolution, including the larger context of related political and economic factors, as well as points of view.




  1. Students create a 3-2-1 summary by writing:

  • 3 events leading to the American Revolution

  • 2 people involved (and their roles/contributions, from Lesson 1)

  • 1 major factor that influenced colonial actions




Materials:

  • chart paper with statements written on them from Day 1 Engage




ELABORATE – Conflicts Today

Suggested Day 4 – 15 minutes

  1. Student pairs participate in a discussion where they answer questions such as the following:

    • What differences (political, economic, beliefs) led to conflict between the British colonies and England?

    • What other American conflicts do you know about? (Answers will vary.)

    • What issues or events led to those conflicts? (Answers will vary.)




  1. Tie all learning for this lesson (and Lesson 1) together by providing an opportunity for students to answer the guiding questions and provide support for the Key Understanding.

  • Different perspectives on economic and political issues often lead to conflict.

  • What economic and political issues existed prior to the Revolutionary War?

  • What different perspectives on those issues did people hold?

  • How could different perspectives lead to conflict?




Instructional Notes:

  • Teacher Resource: Economic and Political Reasons for the Conflict KEY (optional)


Purpose:

Students build understanding that political and economic differences between citizens can lead to conflict.


Instructional Note:

  • Suggestions for conflicts to include in the discussion Mexican War, Civil War (students studied these in 4th Grade), World War I, World War II, Vietnam, Afghanistan, Iraq. Also include other conflicts related to economic and physical characteristic.




EVALUATE – Timeline

Suggested Day 4 (continued)– 35 minutes

  1. Create an illustrated and annotated timeline of the economic and political issues and events that led to the American Revolution. Provide information about the cause and effect relationships between the events and explain the issues involved. (5.2A; 5.24A, 5.24B, 5.24E). 1C, 2G




  1. Students create a timeline of events leading to the American Revolution. Include dates, illustrations, and call-out boxes to identify the events and provide information about cause and effect relationships and economic and political issues related to the event (i.e., Because England owed a huge debt after the French and Indian War, ___. Since the colonists ___, they ___.)

Materials:

  • paper for creating a timeline

  • markers or colored pencils


Purpose:

Provide evidence of learning related to the events leading to the American Revolution


TEKS: 5.2A; 5.24A, 5.24B, 5.24E




©2012, TESCCC 01/07/13 page of



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