Lled 360 Unit Plan: Industrial Revolution



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LESSON PLAN GRID:


Lesson Topic

Subject PLO’s & Specific Lesson Objectives

English Language Arts PLO’s

Methods/ Activities


Resources/ Materials

1. What was the industrial revolution and why was Britain the birthplace?

(February 10)

-Define revolution.

-List factors why Britain was the birthplace of the industrial revolution.

-Analyse factors that contribute to a revolutionary period.


A1 interact and collaborate in pairs and groups to support the learning of self and others, explore experiences, ideas, and information.

C3 write effective imaginative texts to explore ideas and information to make connections and develop insights.





-Introduce myself to the class!

-Class brainstorm: What does ‘revolution’ mean? Teacher will write down ideas on the board.

-Now that we know what a ‘revolution’ is in groups of four (students can pick their own groups for this exercise) make mind maps using the prompts:


  • What makes a time period revolutionary?

  • What do we already know or think the industrial revolution was about?

-Teacher led- discussion- Introduction to the Industrial Revolution and the unit inquiry question.

-Teacher hands out charts for students to fill out as they go through the unit: Benefit/ Cost/ Significance. A vocabulary list will be provided on the back of the chart. Teacher will explain expectations of students for filling out the chart.

-Think/ Pair/ Share- Why did the industrial revolution begin in Britain? Use your textbooks for ideas

-Teacher led discussion using the overhead of why the industrial revolution began in Britain. Students will make a list of reasons in their note books: (availability of raw resources, markets and governmental supply)

-Exit slip: students will do a 5 minute timed write and hand it in. **Teacher will hint at the technological revolution.


-Chalk and chalk board

-Benefit/ Cost/ Significance Charts

-Vocabulary list

-Students will need paper for notes and their textbooks.

-Graphic organizers

-Transparency of graphic organizer

-Overhead Projector.


2. How did the agricultural revolution lay the groundwork for what was coming?

(February 12- Half Class-35 mins)

-Define the Enclosure Act

-Explain why and how new breeds and new technology came into being and their significance to the foundation of industrialization

-Examine a primary source to draw historical conclusions.


B3 view, both collaboratively and independently, to comprehend a variety of visual texts, such as photographs and art.

-Teacher led inquiry discussion using a graphic organizer and the overhead covering: strip farming, enclosure act, private property, new breeds, and new technologies. What was the significance?? Greater food production and population increase. (15 mins)

-Primary source analysis with scaffold questions. Looking at historical picture to conclusions (picture from p. 131 Crossroads) (20 mins) ***Due to the short class this assignment may need to be completed for homework.



-Overhead projector

-Transparency of graphic organizer

-Graphic organizers for students

-primary sources for students

-Worksheets to answer questions about the primary source.


3. How did an agricultural society quickly develop into an industrialized one? (February 16)

-Explain how the steam engine facilitated the movement of goods and people and helped to create new markets.

-Identify factors that influences growth and development of industry

-Discuss what is meant by “the steam engine was the backbone to the Industrial Revolution”


A1 interact and collaborate in pairs and groups to – support the learning of self and others, explore experiences, ideas, and information, understand the perspectives of others and comprehend and respond to a variety of texts.

B6 during reading and viewing, select and use a range of strategies to construct, monitor, and confirm meaning, including making connections, making inferences and drawing conclusions, differentiating main ideas and supporting details, and summarizing.



-Go over the primary source analysis with students.

-Class brainstorm: What conditions must exist in order for an agricultural society to develop into an industrial industry?

-Jigsaw reading of textbook:


  • Divide students up into 5 groups. Get each group to read different sections of the textbook.: An economic revolution, The textile industry, the steam machine, the iron and coal industries, and Transportation- from market to market. Get students to discuss their reading with each other- become experts!

  • Once students are done reading move students to new groups where they can explain their section- team teaching.

-Have a class discussion on each section and create a class timeline of the early economic revolution.

-Get students to Add to Cost/ Benefit/ Significance chart as they discuss with other groups

-Finish Cost/ Benefit/ Significance chart for homework.


-Collect question on the primary source from last class.

-Overhead projector

-Students need to bring their Cost/ Benefit/ Significance chart.

-Students need to bring their textbook.



4. Did capitalism influence society for the better?

(February 18)

-Differentiate between the economic theories of capitalism, socialism and communism

-Discuss notions of wealth in relation to Britain as a capitalist country/ imperial empire.

-Draw and explain a political cartoon.


A7 use listening strategies to understand, recall, and analyse including identifying main points, generating thoughtful questions and clarifying and confirming meaning.

A2 express ideas and information in a variety of situations and forms to explore and respond, recall and describe, narrate and explain, persuade and support, engage and entertain.



-Homework check on Cost/ Benefit/ Significance chart

-Carousel brainstorming of capitalism, communism and socialism using chart paper and markers.

-Teacher lead discussion using a graphic organizer and overhead projector discussion: Capitalism vs. communism vs. socialism


  • Entrepreneurs of middle class Whigs, influenced Government economic policy-laissez faire

  • Laissez-faire policy: businesses and industry free from government regulation and therefore competition and self-interests would serve the greatest good.

  • Show the communist manifesto

-Students create a political cartoon on capitalism; teacher will show students some examples and explain the nature of political cartoons.

-Short teacher led discussion on mechanization and the factory system, Changing in family and home, and increasing living standards, increase connection because of railways, roads and canals.

-Exit slip: if you were to create a perfect Country, would it be a capitalist, Communist or socialist country?

-Homework: Add to Cost/ Benefit/ Significance chart



-Overhead projector

-Graphic organizers

-Transparencies of graphic organizers

-Chart paper

-Markers

- Political cartoon from: http://int.danville.k12.pa.us/teacherweb/aberkey/US_History/Effects_of_Industrial_Rev_Display.html



5. Is the cost of life in factories and towns worth the benefits of production?

(February 23)

-List factors of production and discuss their relationship to industrialisation

-Explain how unions were brought about and why were/ are necessary.

-Analyze a contemporary social issue.


A7 use listening strategies to understand, recall, and analyse a film, including identifying main points, generating thoughtful questions and clarifying and confirming meaning.

A9 speak and listen to interpret, analyse, and evaluate ideas and information, by making and supporting judgments, describing perspectives, identifying bias, contradictions, and non-represented perspectives.



-Homework check on Cost/ Benefit/ Significance chart

-Short teacher led discussion on factory life and production using overhead projector and graphic organiser

-Watch a short film on production/ life in factories during the Industrial Revolution. Movie is not picked yet, but will be chosen in January when I go back to practicum school.

-Class discussion on film

-Workers on the Line- set up activity for next class: craft simulation activity.

-Homework: Add to Cost/ Benefit/ Significance chart.



-Overhead projector

-Transparency of graphic organizer

-Projector for film

-Dongle for computer

-Graphic organizers for students to use when watching film

-Workers on the line pre-activity photocopies

-Pencil crayons


6. Are unions really worth having?

(February 25)

-Discuss the emergence of labour unions during the industrial revolution

-Consider varying perspectives on the issue throughout the simulation

-Argue in a personal reflection whether unions are necessary and make a present-day connection

-Draw connections on unit exam between the causes and nature of conflict between workers ad owners that grew out of the industrial revolution



A9 speak and listen to interpret, analyse, and evaluate ideas and information from the simulation, by making and supporting judgments, examining and comparing ideas, describing perspectives, identifying bias, contradictions, and non-represented perspectives.

C8 write to explain and support personal responses to simulation, by making connections with prior knowledge and experiences, describing reactions and emotions, generating thoughtful questions, and developing opinions using evidence.



-Homework check on Cost/ Benefit/ Significance chart

-Teacher led discussion setting up the game with some background information.

-Students participate in the “Workers on the line” simulation which demonstrates causes and natures of the conflict between workers and owners that grew out of the Industrial Revolution

-Teacher will assign homework: Students will write a reflection on the game using the prompt “Argue whether unions were necessary then and whether they are necessary now?” Due next class, only needs to be 4 or 5 sentences.



-Workers on the line simulation (provided by Karla Kirmis- Teacher at Churchill Secondary)

-Students need to bring their Cost/ Benefit/ Significance chart.



7. How does child labour then compare to child labour today?

(February 27)

-Explain how the factory system affected the lives of people, especially those of children.

-Identify factors that influenced growth and development of industry

-Evaluate the effects of the industrial revolution on society and the changing nature of work

-Analyze the changing nature of law and its relation to social conditions of the times



B2 read, both collaboratively and independently, to comprehend a variety of information and persuasive texts with increasing complexity of ideas and form, such as articles and reports.

A4 select and use a range of strategies to interact and collaborate with others in pairs and groups, including demonstrating awareness of diverse points of view, and contributing ideas and encouraging the ideas of others.





-Hand in reflections from “Workers on the Line” simulation

-Short teacher led discussion on child labour. (10 mins)



  • Poor children, education not compulsory and to survive poor families needed all members to work, children were useful but small, children suffered pollution, noisy, forced to take wages in form of poor quality food, long shifts, beaten and short life spans, stunted growth.

-Jigsaw reading in groups of 4 (assigned by teacher) using 2 articles from the time of the Industrial Revolution and 2 articles around child labour today. Each student should take 2- 3 notes on each of the readings. (50 mins)

-Short teacher led class discussion on the Factory Acts using a graphic organizer and the overhead projector. (10-20 mins)



  • Social reformers try to improve conditions

  • Workers tried to band together similar to guilds that government declared these associations illegal As it would damage the economy

  • Factory act of 1802-illegal for children to work more than 12 hours straight at in a cotton mill

  • 1819- illegal to hire children under nine and textile mills

  • 1824 Union labours became legal

  • Upper-class- workers should work as much as possible as leisure was bad anyway fall into drinking and gambling

-Ask students to brainstorm in pairs what they imagine workers’ rights should be. Share these ideas with the class.

-Homework: Add to Cost/ Benefit/ significance chart




-Collect reflections from the workers on the line simulation.

-Overhead projector

-Jigsaw readings (4 readings)

1. http://www2.needham.k12.ma.us/nhs/cur/Baker_00/2002_p7/ak_p7/childlabor.html

2. http://www.historylearningsite.co.uk/children_industrial_revolution.htm

3. http://fullcomment.nationalpost.com/2014/08/13/national-post-editorial-board-canadas-child-labour-crisis/#__federated=1

4. http://www.canadianlabour.ca/action-center/minimum-age-campaign/minimum-age-laws-canada

-Worksheet for jigsaw readings.

-Graphic organizer for the factory acts.




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