Literature integrating Australian Curriculum



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Unit 3: Power of Literature

Content descriptors

Elaborations


Evaluate the ways in which literary texts represent culture and identity including

  • how readers are influenced to respond to their own and others’ cultural experiences

  • Discuss how the reader’s cultural context and identity shape their response to the texts

  • Discuss values and attitudes presented within the texts

  • Recognise cultural perspective and authorial point of view

  • Compare the perspective presented in the texts with the reader’s point of view

  • the power of language to represent ideas, events and people in particular ways

  • Identify the features of language that shape meaning e.g. emotive language, bias, stereotype, voice

  • Analyse how these features are used to shape readers’ responses

  • Assess the effectiveness of the language used to position the reader

  • how cultural perceptions are challenged or supported

  • Identify assumptions, generalisations and stereotypes of culture through a range of texts

  • Compare and contrast different representations of culture

  • Assess the impact or effect of these assumptions, generalizations and stereotypes of culture

  • the ways in which authors represent Australian culture, place and identity both to Australians and the wider world

  • Identify defining aspects of Australian culture

  • Examine a selection of texts/excerpts which represent Australian culture (including place and identity)

  • Analyse the different approaches (narrative structure, narrative voice) authors have taken to represent Australian culture, place and identity

  • Explore how appropriation is used to represent Australian national identity

  • Assess how texts are constructed to portray a national image and how Australia is perceived by others

Evaluate and reflect on how representations of culture and identity vary in different texts and forms of texts including

  • the relationship between significant historical and cultural events and figures, and their representations in literary texts

  • Identify the significant historical and cultural events and figures in texts

  • Investigate the historical and cultural context of texts

  • Analyse how authors construct events and figures drawing on historical and cultural contexts

  • Assess the effectiveness of fiction as a way to reinterpret historical and cultural events and figures

  • the impact of the use of literary conventions and stylistic techniques

  • Identify the literary conventions (e.g. features of genre, structural aspects of texts) and stylistic techniques (e.g. narrative viewpoint, structure of stanzas, juxtaposition, nominalisation, symbolism, lexical choice) used in texts to represent culture and identity

  • Analyse the ways in which these techniques are employed in the evocation of culture and identity

  • Evaluate how the reader is affected by the author’s choice of literary conventions and stylistic techniques




  • the effectiveness of specific literary conventions in texts, for example, the use of iambic pentameter, stream-of-consciousness, flashbacks, chorus

  • Identify specific literary conventions used in texts to represent culture and identity

  • Analyse the ways in which these techniques are employed in the evocation of culture and identity

  • Evaluate the effectiveness of specific literary conventions

  • the ways in which language, structural and stylistic choices communicate values and attitudes and shed new light on familiar ideas.

  • Identify commonly accepted values and attitudes explored in texts

  • Discuss shifts in representation of values and attitudes in texts

  • Reflect on how the author’s construction of texts, values and attitudes challenge the reader’s viewpoint

Create analytical texts:

  • developing independent interpretations of texts supported by informed observation and close textual analysis

  • Establish a point of view

  • Draw meaning from texts using supporting evidence to create analytical responses




  • using appropriate linguistic, stylistic and critical terminology to analyse and evaluate texts

  • Identify key features of analytical writing e.g. essays

  • Develop the analytical vocabulary (metalanguage) that enables effective analysis and evaluation of texts

  • Create sustained analytical arguments that convey judgments on texts




  • evaluating their own and others’ ideas and points of view using logic and evidence

  • Examine critically a range of responses to texts

  • Assess the ideas represented against students’ ideas

  • Justify responses using evidence

  • Create sustained and logical arguments




  • experimenting with different modes, mediums and forms

  • Identify possible mediums, modes or forms that can be used to convey ideas (for example, feature articles, website, digital essay, analytical essay)

  • Select and use appropriate mediums, modes and forms to convey meaning

  • Experiment with different modes, mediums and forms for impact and effect

Create imaginative texts:

  • experimenting with content, form, style, language and medium

  • Identify possible content, form, style, language and medium

  • Explore a range of mediums to express ideas and/or understanding

  • Select and use appropriate form, style, language, medium to suit the purpose of the task

  • drawing on knowledge and experience of genre, literary devices and the interplay of the visual and verbal in creating new texts

  • Select key features of genre in creating texts

  • Consider audience and purpose in creating new texts

  • Create imaginative multimodal texts (optional)

  • adapting literary conventions for specific audiences, challenging conventions and reinterpreting ideas and perspectives

  • Identify literary conventions (e.g. pastiche) in appropriated texts

  • Experiment with literary conventions (e.g. intertextuality) to create new and original texts

  • Employ appropriation to create new and original texts

  • reflecting on the different ways in which form, personal style, language and content engage and position the audience

  • Identify how the values and attitudes of a text can position an audience

  • Utilise appropriate aspects of form, style and language to position an audience

  • Create texts that effectively engage and position the audience

  • Evaluate the effectiveness of texts to influence an audience


Unit 4: Literary Interpretations

Content descriptors

Elaborations


Evaluate the dynamic relationship between authors, texts, audiences and contexts including

  • how literature reflects cultural change and difference

  • Identify how changing attitudes (towards issues such as social class, gender, religion and race) and differing values and perceptions are revealed in a range of literary forms, genres and styles

  • Assess how the context of the time has shaped creators of texts’ values and attitudes

  • Discuss how the attitudes and values conveyed in the text shape audience’s responses to cultural change and difference

  • the ways in which the expectations and values of audiences shape perceptions of texts and their significance

  • identify how expectations and values of audiences are reflected in a range of literary texts

  • Discuss how the expectations and values of the audience are challenged and/or confirmed by the author’ss position in a range of literary texts.

  • Assess the impact of the author’s position on the audience.

  • how texts in different literary forms, mediums or traditions are the same or different

  • Identify how literary forms or mediums observe traditional conventions or are shaped and changed to reflect the writer’s intent.

  • Consider why the writer has made a choice to either observe or alter the chosen medium or form.

  • how interpretations of texts vary over time

  • Identify how audiences respond differently to a range of literary forms, genres and styles over time.

  • Consider the factors that have caused changes in audience’s responses.

  • the ways in which perspectives are conveyed through texts drawn from other times and cultures, and how these may be renewed for a contemporary Australian audience.

  • Identify values in attitudes and values in a range of texts from other times and cultures.

  • Examine how values and attitudes are conveyed in a range of texts from other times and cultures.

  • Discuss how perspectives from other times and cultures may be relevant for Australian contemporary audiences.

Evaluate and reflect on the ways in which literary texts can be interpreted including:

  • how ideas, values and assumptions are conveyed

  • Understand the difference between ideas, values and assumptions.

  • Identify examples of ideas, values and assumptions in texts.

  • Examine the ways in which writers convey ideas, values and assumptions in a range of literary forms, genres and styles.

  • Assess the effectiveness of the ways in which writers convey ideas, values and assumptions.

  • how specific literary elements and forms shape meaning and influence responses, for example, mise-en-scène, enjambment, dramatic monologue and verse drama

  • Identify specific literary elements and forms used by writers in a range of literary forms, genres and styles.

  • Examine how specific literary elements and forms are used for a particular effect to shape audience response.

  • Analyse the effectiveness of the writer’s use of literary elements and forms and how these influence the audience’s interpretation of texts.

  • how medium, form, language and wordplay contribute to interpretations of texts

  • Identify techniques used by the writer to construct the text and shape meaning

  • Examine how these techniques impact on interpretations of texts.

  • Analyse the effectiveness of these techniques on audiences’ responses.

  • exploring a range of critical interpretations.

  • Form an interpretation of texts

  • Consider alternative interpretations of texts

  • Justify different critical interpretations of texts

Create analytical texts:

  • developing a creative, informed and sustained interpretation supported by close textual analysis

  • Establish an interpretation of texts

  • Develop an original, informed and sustained interpretation of texts.

  • Justify the interpretation by providing evidence from texts.

  • using appropriate linguistic, stylistic and critical terminology to evaluate and justify interpretations of texts

  • Identify and select appropriate linguistics, stylistic and critical terminology for analysis of texts.

  • Select appropriate evidence to support interpretation of texts

  • Employ relevant and effective metalanguage and stylistic choices to create an analysis of texts.

  • critically evaluating their own and others' justifications, evidence and points of view

  • Identify their own and others’ interpretations of texts

  • Examine the evidence used in their own and others’ interpretations of texts

  • Assess the strength of the argument and validity of their own and others’ interpretations.

  • experimenting with different modes, mediums and forms

  • identify appropriate modes, mediums and forms for analysis of texts

  • Create analytical responses selecting the mode, medium and form best suited to the purpose

Create imaginative texts:

  • adapting medium, form, style, point of view and language

  • Understand how a range of mediums, forms, styles, points of view and language can be used to create texts.

  • Identify appropriate medium, form, style, point of view and language to create imaginative texts

  • Manipulate different mediums, forms, styles, point of view and language best suited to the purpose.

  • experimenting with elements of style and voice to achieve specific effects

  • Identify elements of style and voice in texts.

  • Create specific effects by using appropriate elements of style and voice.

  • manipulating literary conventions for different audiences and contexts

  • Identity literary conventions suitable for different audiences and contexts

  • Adapt literary conventions for different audiences and contexts

  • reflecting on the ways in which expectations and values of audiences shape the created text.

  • Understand the ways in which the creation of texts is influenced by the expectations and values of the audience

  • Evaluate the ways in which the expectations and values of the audience affect how texts are created.




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