Lincoln Fall 2011 Politics 4352/5307 Dr. David Upham



Download 23.15 Kb.
Date29.05.2016
Size23.15 Kb.

Lincoln Fall 2011

Politics 4352/5307 Dr. David Upham




Syllabus


Contact:

Email is the best way to get a hold of me. My email address is davidrupham@yahoo.com. Office hours: Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 2:00-2:50.


Course Objectives:

The purpose of this course is to study Lincoln as a legal and political thinker. Our focus will be on assessing (1) Lincoln’s claim that his political efforts were designed to preserve (and even renew) the principles of the Founding and (2) the ways in which these efforts reflected the virtue of political prudence—i.e., statesmanship.


Course Requirements:

Essays 30%

Examinations 50% (Two mid-terms, 10% each; final exam, 30%)

Quizzes 10%

For grad students: One paper (60%). Midterms will be 10% each, final 20% (40%). Quiz grades will be considered in assessing students’ attendance and participation (see below).
Essays: There will be one essay assignments of roughly 7 pages each for undergraduate students. For graduate students, the final paper should be roughly 15 pages in length. Students will submit a preliminary outline. Students will be notified of the assignment and relevant due dates in September.
Examinations: There will be two mid-terms (more specifically, “third-terms”) and a final examination. In almost all cases, a student will receive a score of 0% for a missed exam; nor will any make-up exam be possible. Do not take this course if you have scheduled any activities that will conflict with the date and time of the examinations. The midterms will occur in class on Friday, September 30 and Monday, October 31. For planning purposes, please assume that the final exam will be scheduled for the last session of the last exam day.
Quizzes: There will be regular quizzes on the assigned reading.
Class attendance and participation: The degree to which the students make a positive contribution to classroom discussion will contribute to their final grades in the class. While no precise percentage point is allocated to class participation, an assessment of such participation will be particularly important in determining the grade of students whose percentage average is borderline, and in extraordinary cases, can significantly affect the final grade. Moreover, the university attendance policy, as described in the University Bulletin, will be enforced. After four unexcused absences, a student may be dropped from the course.
University policies on cheating and plagiarism will be strictly enforced. Plagiarism is any attempt to represent the work of another as one’s own. Consequently, in your essays, you must provide a footnote citation for any quotation or paraphrase from another’s work.
Required Texts:
Abraham Lincoln: His Speeches and Writings (Roy P. Basler ed. 1946).
The Lincoln-Douglas Debates: The First Complete Unexpurgated Text (Harold Holzer ed. 1993 or 2004).
Harry V. Jaffa, Crisis of the House Divided: An Interpretation of the Issues in the Lincoln-Douglas Debates (1958, 1982, 2009).


Assignments

Class 1: Lincoln the Young Whig

Lincoln, 53–60, 70–72 (last 5 paras. of speech), 90, 98–113 (national bank and finance)
Class 2: Lyceum Address

Lincoln, 76–85


Class 3: Jaffa on the Lyceum Address

Jaffa, 182–232


Class 4: Lincoln on slavery and temperance

Lincoln, 121–23, 169–171, 131–41

Jaffa, 233–272 (on Temperance Address)

Classes 5–6: Lincoln—early views on religion, presidential powers


Lincoln, 186–189 (religious views and 1846 congressional election), 199–223 (Mexican War); 233–250 (campaign speech for Taylor).
Class 7: Founders on slavery

Packet, 1-9


Class 8: Abolitionist and pro-slavery thought.

Packet, 10-28


Class 9–10: Compromise of 1850: Resolution of “all existing questions of controversy”

Packet, 28–33

Lincoln, 264–78 (eulogy to Henry Clay, slavery)

Jaffa, 133–80 (Douglas on 1850 superseding MO Comp. and intent in 1854)


Class 11-12: Lincoln and the Kansas-Nebraska Act


Lincoln, 278–325, 326–32.

Class 13: The 1856 Election


Packet, 34–36

Lincoln, 339–52


Class 14: First midterm exam: Friday, September 30
Class 15: Dred Scott

Packet, 37–57


Class 16: Lincoln on Dred Scott and the evil of slavery

Lincoln, 352–66, 427, 473–74, 477–78



Class 17: Launching campaign of 1858


Lincoln, 372–84

Packet, 57–63


Class 18: Pre-debate speeches

Lincoln, 385–424


Class 19–20: Debate at Ottawa

Debates, 40–85



Class 21: Debate at Freeport


Debates, 86–90, 91–96, 104–111, 123–126, 127–130, 132–34.
Class 22: Debate at Jonesboro

Debates, 136–39, 151–53, 167–73, 177–78, 181–84



Class 23: Debate at Charleston


Debates, 185–88, 189-90, 222–235, 226–28
Class 24: Debate at Galesburg

Debates, 234–37, 243–51, 252–56, 262–66, 270, 273–76


Class 25: Debate at Quincy

Debates, 277–80, 284–85, 285–87, 290–93, 297–98, 302–07, 310–12, 315–18


Class 26: Debate at Alton

Debates, 320–24, 325–26, 329–30, 337–39, 341–42, 350–62, 363–70


Class 27: Second midterm exam: Monday, October 31.

Class 28: Losing elections and building coalitions


Lincoln, 480–83, 486–87, 491–93

Class 29: Rallying the base


Lincoln, 517–36

Class 30: Nomination and Campaign


Packet, 64-68

Lincoln, 513, 542–44, 561–64


Class 31: Winter of Secession

Packet, 69–76

Lincoln, 564–78
Class 32: Lincoln’s First Inaugural

Lincoln, 579–88



Class 33: Rallying the North


Lincoln, 594–611
Class 34: Constitution v. Preservation of Union

Lincoln, 513

Packet, 76-82; Lincoln, 598–601, 624, 630 (H. Corpus and related), 699–708

Packet, 83–84 (W. Va.)


Class 35: Lincoln manages his generals and consoles his people

Lincoln 636–39, 643–46, 657–660, 664–65, 693–94, 698

Packet, 86-88, Lincoln, 749–50

Lincoln, 710–11, 726–27, 731, 744, 750–51, 765, 789–91, 796

Lincoln, 592–93, 688–89, 727–29, 766

Class 36: Emancipation, the Constitution, and the Union


Lincoln, 513

Lincoln, 613–15, 651–52, 640–41 (Initial limited emancipation)

Lincoln, 689–91, 720–25; Packet, 84–85 (Emancipation Proclamation)

Class 37: Union and Comprehensive Emancipation


Lincoln, 629–30, Packet, 88–94

Lincoln, 676–88


Class 38: Freedom as the Purpose of the Union


Lincoln, 633–35, 709–10, 756–57, 734
Class 39: Election of 1864: Liberty and Union—One and Inseparable

Packet, 95–98

Lincoln, 759, 760–61, 763–64, 766, 785–86

Class 40: A “just and lasting peace”


Lincoln, 738–41, 745, 747, 796–801
Class 41: Piety and national unity

Lincoln, 655, 757–58; Packet, 85 (last paragraph)

Lincoln, 792–93

Partial Bibliography

Lincoln, Abraham Collected Works (Basler, ed.) (1953–55)

E457.91 .B3 (all volumes, including index)
Anastaplo, George Abraham Lincoln: A Constitutional Biography (1999)

E 457.2 .A54 1999


Briggs, John Channing

Lincoln’s Speeches Reconsidered (2005)
Fehrenbacher, Don. Prelude to Greatness (1962, repr. 1970)

(Not in library)


The Leadership of Abraham Lincoln (1970)

E457 .F4 1970


The Dred Scott Case: Its Significance in American Law and Politics (1978) KF4545.S5 F43
Goodwin, Doris Kearns

Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln (2005).

E 457.45 .G66 2005


Guelzo, Allen C. Lincoln and Douglas: The Debates That Defined America (2008)

(Not in library)


Guelzo, Allen C. Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation: The End of Slavery in America (2004) E 453 .G9 2004.
Donald, David Herbert

Lincoln Reconsidered: Essays on the Civil War Era (1956).

E457.8 .D69


Holzer, Harold



Lincoln at Cooper Union: The Speech That Made Abraham Lincoln President (2004). E 440 .H65 2004
The Lincoln Anthology: Great Writers on His Life and Legacy from 1860 to Now (2009) E 457.92 .H65 2009
Jaffa, Harry A New Birth of Freedom : Abraham Lincoln and the Coming of the Civil War E 459 .J34 2000

McPherson, James M. Abraham Lincoln and the Second American Revolution (1992).

E 457.2 M4758 1991
Neely, Mark E. The Fate of Liberty: Abraham Lincoln and Civil Liberties (1991). E457.2 .N46 1991
The Last Best Hope of Earth: Abraham Lincoln and the Promise of America (1995) E457 .N49 1995
Paludan, Philip Shaw The Presidency of Abraham Lincoln (1994) E457 .P18 1994
Randall, J.G. Constitutional Problems under Lincoln (1951)

JK201 .R18 1951


Wills, Garry Lincoln at Gettysburg: The Words That Remade America (1993)

E 475.55 .W54 1992

Share with your friends:




The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2020
send message

    Main page