Lesson One Teacher Name: Andrew Brue Lesson Date and Time: 1/6/14 Number of Students: 29 Miscellaneous Information



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Lesson One

Teacher Name: Andrew Brue Lesson Date and Time: 1/6/14

Number of Students: 29

Miscellaneous Information (special considerations for instruction):




Instructional Context:

What do I know about my students that will inform this lesson?


Students in this class have had a wide range of different exposures to technology. As such, they will likely have different viewpoints on how it affects our lives. This will be the starting point of discussion of how inventions and technology impact our lives.
How does this lesson connect with and build on previous lesson(s) or learning?
Previous lessons have covered the basics behind the First Industrial Revolution. It has been two months since that material was last covered so it will be good to review the basics of that knowledge. The students should still have a good understanding of Eli Whitney and how his invention impacted society. They will likely need a review of the understanding of how the development of interchangeable parts was a large part of the First Industrial Revolution. This lesson will focus on how the Second Industrial Revolution had a similar drive to it but was based upon new power sources, Oil and Electricity.
How do you expect to build on this lesson in subsequent lessons?
Tomorrow’s lesson will build on their understanding of how inventions/innovations impact society by placing these inventions within the development of corporations. Their assessment for this lesson will develop as part of their larger Business Plan assignment.
Materials and Resources:
Second Industrial Revolution PowerPoint

Video - “Microsoft's Concept of How 2019 Will Look Like - Official Video”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bwj2s_5e12U

Business Plan Worksheet #1

Business Plan Rubric
What is the lesson objective?

SWBAT:


  1. Identify the impact of inventions and innovation of the Second Industrial Revolution on American Society

Standards addressed and expectations of students:

7.4.4.20.1 - Explain the impact of the United States Industrial Revolution on the production, consumption and distribution of goods. For example: Iron and steel industries, transcontinental railroad, electric lighting, Sears Roebuck & Co. (Development of an Industrial United States: 1870 -- 1920)

Anticipatory Set:
Video – “Microsoft's Concept of How 2019 Will Look Like - Official Video”
Questions:

  1. How does technology affect our lives?

  2. How will this technology change the way we live?


Academic Language/Language Function Objectives:
Language Function = Identify
Academic Language:

Revolution: Change in a system


Manufacturing: raw materials/ processed goods
Invention: creating something new

vs


Innovation: improving something that already exists

Content Vocabulary:

Second Industrial Revolution: period of rapid growth in US manufacturing in the late 1800s; characterized by dramatic developments in oil and electricity

Bessemer Process: creates a cheaper and faster process to manufacture steel

Teaching/Instructional Strategies and Learning Tasks (procedures and timelines):

(Teacher talk/Input, modeling, and checking for understanding)




Time

Instructional Strategies and Learning Tasks

Purpose

10 min

Bellringer: Video – Microsoft 2019 Predictions

How does technology affect our lives?”

How will our lives be different if these inventions take effect?”
PPT – Slide 1 & 2


Spark thoughts as to how technology relates to our lives

10 min

SECOND INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION – Anticipation Brainstorm

(Identify misconceptions/basic understandings)

What do we already know? Throw out concepts, names, ideas. Feel free to respectfully challenge anything that is up on the board.

What comes to mind when you hear these words?

Who might be involved?

Word by Word



  • Revolution = a forcible overthrowing of a system

  • Industrial = processing of raw and manufactured goods

  • Second = What question does this make you think of? (Is there a first?)

Review of the First Industrial Revolution:

Who was Eli Whitney and what did he do? Inventor of the Cotton Gin and developer of the idea of interchangeable parts
Primary Sources of Manufacturing: Iron, Steam, Textiles
That was the first, now what is the second?

Define the Second Industrial Revolution: a period of rapid growth in US manufacturing in the late 1800s

(PPT – Slide 3)
The discovery of two new sources of power will lead to this rapid growth of inventions and innovations
Primary Sources of Manufacturing : Electricity, Combustion Engine, Communication

(PPT – Slide 4)



Introduce the Second Industrial Revolution and connect it to the First Industrial Revolution

10 min

What was the impact of Eli Whitney’s invention? Greater cotton production, increase in slavery etc.

How does an invention or innovation impact our daily lives?

  • Difference between Invention and Innovation (Academic Language)

Analyze the effects of inventions

10 min

The first key concept of the Second Industrial Revolution is that the inventions/innovations would have a chain reaction of events that follow.  It would REVOLUTIONIZE society. The Second Industrial Revolution would be marked by a dramatic increase manufactured goods.

Summarize the impact of the Second Industrial Revolution

5 min

How you about you? Do you have any great business ideas you have always wanted to share?

Assignment: Business Plan

Step one: Read pgs 616 - 618

Step two: Get Creative  come up with an idea for a business – think about what innovation or invention you might offer

Step three: Complete Business Plan Sheet #1
DUE TOMORROW AT THE START OF CLASS
Hand out Rubric and Business Plan Worksheet. Remind them to fully read through the Rubric (We will go through this as a class on Thursday as well).

(PPT – Slide 9)



Students will use their knowledge the cause and effect of inventions to create their own business

Flex

Work Time




Guided practice and monitoring and assessments:

  • Worksheet: Business Plan #1

    • Cause and Effect – monitor to see if students are picking up the results of inventions from the reading


Independent Practice/Assignment:

  • Business Plan: create a business idea that involves an innovation or invention. Who will your invention impact?


Closure:
The Second Industrial Revolution was sparked by the discovery of new sources of power that led to a flood of inventions and innovations. What might spark a new revolution today? Maybe it starts with your invention!
Reflection:

(What worked and didn’t work – for whom and why? What are instructional next steps abased on the data from this plan?)




Lesson Two

Teacher Name: Andrew Brue Lesson Date and Time: 1/7/14

Number of Students: 29

Miscellaneous Information (special considerations for instruction):



  • Three ELL students

  • One 504 Plan (Dyslexia) – break down assignments into shorter segments

  • Two IEPs

    • 2 SLD – Tests read aloud


Instructional Context:

What do I know about my students that will inform this lesson?


Students have likely heard of the stock market but probably have a limited understanding of how it works. This may be the most challenging lesson of the unit to teach as I will have to quickly gauge their understanding of how a corporation works. There may be key misconceptions about the stock market to pick up at this point.
How does this lesson connect with and build on previous lesson(s) or learning?
Yesterday’s lesson developed the concept of how inventions and innovations have a wide ranging impact. This lesson will look at how these ideas develop into corporations as inventors seek out investors.
How do you expect to build on this lesson in subsequent lessons?
Tomorrow’s lesson will focus on how the idea of interchangeable parts does not work when it comes to people. The corporations that are built in today’s lesson will struggle with how to take care of their employees.
Materials and Resources:
Monopoly Money

Video – “Shark Tank” Season 5 Episode 8

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gwSxGPz3GBY

Textbook



What is the lesson objective?

SWBAT:


  1. Identify how business structures changed as a result of the Second Industrial Revolution

  2. Explain the reaction against Trusts (Sherman Antitrust Act)



Standards addressed and expectations of students:

7.4.4.20.1 - Explain the impact of the United States Industrial Revolution on the production, consumption and distribution of goods. For example: Iron and steel industries, transcontinental railroad, electric lighting, Sears Roebuck & Co. (Development of an Industrial United States: 1870 -- 1920)

7.4.4.20.2 - Analyze the consequences of economic transformation on migration, immigration, politics and public policy at the turn of the twentieth century. For example: The "New Immigration" from Eastern and Southern Europe, "Great Migration" of African Americans to the North, Tammany Hall, Sherman Anti-Trust Act. (Development of an Industrial United States: 1870 -- 1920)


Anticipatory Set:
What inventors do we have in the room? Business Ideas?
Select a student to introduce his or her business idea and get them thinking about what their next steps would be to start their business. Teacher will use monopoly money to “invest” in the students business. Class will then predict what the investor would expect in return. This will introduce the basic idea of corporate investment.
Academic Language/Language Function Objectives:

Language Function = Identify & Explain

Investment: giving money for profit

Content Vocabulary:

Corporation: businesses that sell portions of ownership called stock shares

Trust: a legal arrangement grouping together a number of companies under a single board of directors

Monopoly”
Teaching/Instructional Strategies and Learning Tasks (procedures and timelines):

(Teacher talk/Input, modeling, and checking for understanding)




Time

Instructional Strategies and Learning Tasks

Purpose

5 min

Discussion: What inventors do we have in the room? What great business ideas did we come up with?

To re-engage students in the process of business development

5 min

Who is ready to start a business? Pick one student to come up to the front of the room. Have the student give their basic idea of their invention and explain what he or she needs to get started on their business. Then ask “Can you start your business today?”

 Looking for a “No, we don’t have any money”.

Ask for a student who wants to support them in their business idea. Give this student (Investor) monopoly money to give to the inventors. Ask the Investor “What do you expect in return?”
Explain that this is the basic idea behind how a corporation is formed. That the owners of a business sell part ownership of their business in order to get money to expand their business.
This was a new concept that was just being introduced during the Second Industrial Revolution. This new business structure allowed for people to dramatically expand their businesses


Kinesthetic activity to engage with the idea of starting a corporation

10 min

Modern Day Example: “Shark Tank” Video

Questions:



  1. Who were the investors?

  2. What did they want in return?

These are examples of people looking to make it big today. During the Second Industrial Revolution many would use this new idea of business—the corporation—to build giant businesses.

Connect to Modern Day

20

Biographies of people who grew their businesses… Textbook pg. 620 - 621

  1. Andrew Carnegie

  2. John D. Rockefeller

  3. Leland Stanford

Read Aloud – ask for student volunteers to read aloud. This will allow for the ELL students to follow along through the reading. STOP the reading after each of the businessmen are introduced and ask:

How did they build their business?

What is horizontal and vertical integration?

How did they try to get rid of competitors?

Identify how business developed during the Industrial Revolution. (Learning Objective)

10

These men would go on to form HUGE businesses and wanted to come up with ideas of how to get rid of their competitors. They formed :
Trusts: made it so that you could only do business with certain companies.
Led to the potential for:
monopolies: total ownership of a product or service.
Discuss: Is competition good for the economy? What happens because of it?
Sherman Antitrust Act: made it illegal to create monopolies or trusts that limited trade
How do you think our huge business leaders felt about this?

Debate what the different viewpoints of business in America were.




Assignment: Corporate Plan (with business partner)

Step 1: How will you convince people to invest?

Step 2: How will you grow your business? Will you try to eliminate competition?

Step 3: Complete “Rich Guy Strategies” worksheet



Continue to build their business plan based on their new knowledge from the day

Guided practice and monitoring and assessments:

Informal assessment through classroom discussion on competition

Informal assessment on sharing of business ideas

Worksheet  Learning outcome of identifying how business leaders were able to grow their businesses



Independent Practice/Assignment:
Formal assessment – “Rich Guy Strategies” worksheet  practice in identifying the strategies of Carnegie and Rockefeller through analytical reading. This will be practice in pulling out key information from the text. I have given the first step in directing them to define a term from the section. My plan is that this will direct their reading to main topics.
Closure:
The Second Industrial Revolution brought about what new business practice? The Corporation!

This business structure would result in rapidly growing businesses and make the United States one of the fastest growing nations in the world.


Reflection:

(What worked and didn’t work – for whom and why? What are instructional next steps abased on the data from this plan?)



Lesson Three

Teacher Name: Andrew Brue Lesson Date and Time: 1/8/14

Number of Students: 29

Miscellaneous Information (special considerations for instruction):



  • Three ELL students

  • One 504 Plan (Dyslexia) – break down assignments into shorter segments

  • Two IEPs

    • 2 SLD – Tests read aloud


Instructional Context:

What do I know about my students that will inform this lesson?


Students come from a wide range of socio-economic backgrounds. This lesson will include discussion about the topic of labor unions that may generate a wide range or perspectives from the students. Some students may have parents who are part of unions or who may feel strongly against unions.
How does this lesson connect with and build on previous lesson(s) or learning?
Yesterday’s lesson focused on how the Second Industrial Revolution introduced a new approach to business that lead to huge corporations. These corporations would often push for a profit at the expense of their employees. Today’s lesson will focus on the response of workers to poor working conditions in these huge corporations.
How do you expect to build on this lesson in subsequent lessons?
In subsequent lessons students will be using the knowledge they have gained over the past three days to create a business plan that incorporates their knowledge of innovation, the development of a corporation, and the treatment of employees.
Materials and Resources:
Second Industrial Revolution PowerPoint

Reading – “What was the effect of the Industrial Revolution of factory workers?”

Video – Andrew Carnegie

http://www.history.com/topics/homestead-strike/videos#homestead-strike


What is the lesson objective?

SWBAT:


  1. Identify how labor changed as a result of the Second Industrial Revolution

  2. Identify the poor labor management decisions of the Homestead Strike.


Standards addressed and expectations of students:
7.4.4.20.1 - Explain the impact of the United States Industrial Revolution on the production, consumption and distribution of goods. For example: Iron and steel industries, transcontinental railroad, electric lighting, Sears Roebuck & Co. (Development of an Industrial United States: 1870 -- 1920)

7.4.4.20.2 - Analyze the consequences of economic transformation on migration, immigration, politics and public policy at the turn of the twentieth century. For example: The "New Immigration" from Eastern and Southern Europe, "Great Migration" of African Americans to the North, Tammany Hall, Sherman Anti-Trust Act. (Development of an Industrial United States: 1870 -- 1920)


Anticipatory Set:
Pictures of late 1800s working conditions – Describe using one word.
Academic Language/Language Function Objectives:

Language Function = Identify


Content Vocabulary:
Labor Union: organization of workers formed to protect their rights and interests

Collective Bargaining: all workers acting together had a much greater chance of success in negotiating with management

Homestead Strike: worker strike at Andrew Carnegie’s factory

Specialization


Teaching/Instructional Strategies and Learning Tasks (procedures and timelines):

(Teacher talk/Input, modeling, and checking for understanding)




Time

Instructional Strategies and Learning Tasks

Purpose

5 min

Pictures of late 1800s working conditions – Describe using one word.
Today our goal is to put ourselves into the shoes of a worker during the Second Industrial Revolution and identify how labor changed as a result of it.

1) Connect lesson with previous knowledge of corporations

2) Generate interest in the working conditions of the late 1800s



5 min

The Second Industrial Revolution changed working conditions in two major ways:

  1. Rise of the machines – reduced need for skilled craftsmen and women

  2. Specialization – workers repeating the same step again and again  means they could be easily replaced!

If you were a worker during this time how would you feel?

Direct Teach (NOTES): Notes on the two changes in labor

20 min

Reading: “What was the effect of the Industrial Revolution on factory workers?”

In English you are beginning to learn about what it means to write a thesis statement. A thesis statement is a basically the main point of a paper – it’s your argument. On the board I will put up the parts of this author’s thesis statement. Your challenge is to identify the author’s thesis statement and three ways the author supports their claim..



Write in notebooks.

Identify effects of the changes in labor. Locate a thesis statement and supporting evidence.

3 min

If you were a worker during this time how would you get out of the situation? Fight or Talk?

Discuss possible solutions to poor working conditions. Connect to ideas of opening up dialogue with management.

5 min

Define – two concepts that are closely related…

Collective Bargaining: all workers acting together had a much greater chance of success in negotiating with management


Union: an organized association of workers formed to protect and further their rights and interests

Direct Teach (NOTES): Terms related to labor relations

5 min

Example of Bad Labor Relations: Homestead Strike

Intro questions:

Who was Andrew Carnegie?

He was a great business man but do you think he always had control over his factories?



  • Be looking for what poor choices are made in terms of taking care of employees.

Show Video of Homestead Strike

Visual Representation of labor relations

7 min

Assignment:

Step One: Identify three mistakes made by Carnegie

Step Two: Business Plan Sheet #3 – How will you support workers’ rights?


Put concepts into practice by adding them to their developing business plan

Guided practice and monitoring and assessments:

Informal assessment through classroom discussion: “Describe using one word”,” Fight or Talk?”

Informal assessment through identification of thesis statement and discourse writing in notebooks

Independent Practice/Assignment:
Formal assessment through Business Plan Worksheet # 3
Closure:

The Second Industrial Revolution dramatically changed in two particular ways – Specialization and the use of machines. These changes would force relations between workers and management to change as well. Your challenge is to figure out how you would relate to your employees as you start up your business.



Reflection:

(What worked and didn’t work – for whom and why? What are instructional next steps abased on the data from this plan?)



Lesson Four and Five

Teacher Name: Andrew Brue Lesson Date and Time: 1/9/14 – 1/10/14

Number of Students: 29

Miscellaneous Information (special considerations for instruction):



  • Three ELL students

  • One 504 Plan (Dyslexia) – break down assignments into shorter segments

  • Two IEPs

    • 2 SLD – Tests read aloud  allow for assessment in smaller setting


Instructional Context:

What do I know about my students that will inform this lesson?


Allow time in class to finalize their projects. However, seventh graders are also specialists in getting off task. Make sure that work time is used on projects or the students who are off task will be volunteering themselves to go first. Students may feel uncomfortable with giving a presentation – allow for time to ask questions, settle concerns.
How does this lesson connect with and build on previous lesson(s) or learning?
This lesson will be a culmination of the past three lessons. In this lesson they will finalize their plans and identify ways to justify their reasoning based on historical examples that we have discussed this week.
How do you expect to build on this lesson in subsequent lessons?
Subsequent lessons will include their final “Sales Pitch” of their business plan.
Materials and Resources:
Extra Rubrics
What is the lesson objective?

(What will the students learn and/or demonstrate?”)




  1. Use historical examples to justify their arguments


Standards addressed and expectations of students:

(MN State or National Standards)


7.4.4.20.1 - Explain the impact of the United States Industrial Revolution on the production, consumption and distribution of goods. For example: Iron and steel industries, transcontinental railroad, electric lighting, Sears Roebuck & Co. (Development of an Industrial United States: 1870 -- 1920)

7.4.4.20.2 - Analyze the consequences of economic transformation on migration, immigration, politics and public policy at the turn of the twentieth century. For example: The "New Immigration" from Eastern and Southern Europe, "Great Migration" of African Americans to the North, Tammany Hall, Sherman Anti-Trust Act. (Development of an Industrial United States: 1870 -- 1920)


Anticipatory Set:

(The “hook” - something to excite the students about the subject matter)


Today is the day to convince your potential employees and investors!
Academic Language/Language Function Objectives:

(Vocabulary that essential for you as a teacher to include in this lesson and for the students to understand and use)


Language Function: Justify
Teaching/Instructional Strategies and Learning Tasks (procedures and timelines):

(Teacher talk/Input, modeling, and checking for understanding)




Time

Instructional Strategies and Learning Tasks

Purpose

2 min

Hook: Today is the day to convince your potential employees and investors

Build excitement for presentations

8 min

Outline for the Sales Pitch

  1. Classmate = potential employees. After your pitch your classmates will have the chance to ask up to three questions before voting of they would like to work for you.

  2. Teachers = potential investors. After your pitch your teachers will have the chance to ask up to three questions before deciding if they would like to invest. (Teachers: if you choose not to “invest” in the business give reasons as to what may be missing. Example – How will you grow your business? Who will your business impact?)

Plan for your responses. You will be asked to justify your explanations using historical examples.

What are some historical examples you could use?

Andrew Carnegie = Vertical Integration

John D. Rockefeller = Horizontal Integration

Wright Brothers = effects of inventions

Alexander Graham Bell = effects of inventions

The Homestead Strike = poor labor relations

Assembly Lines

Specialization



Prepare students for what will be expected of them. Direct Teach what it means to justify a claim.

10 min

Ten minutes to finalize your plan.
Review the rubric and fill out the self-graded section (Did you complete every section? Are you prepared for the sales pitch?).
Demonstrate how to order the business plan and staple together the materials.

Work time to reflect, finalize, and self-grade.

Remainder

Sales Pitch:

  • Ask for volunteers to start.

  • Students who have been off task will be volunteering themselves to go first.

  • Remind the class of what a respectful audience looks like

Demonstration of knowledge

10 min

Closure (FRIDAY): Repeat Introductory slide on the Second Industrial Revolution (in a similar fashion to a KWL)

What impact did the Second Industrial Revolution have on business?

“ “ on labor?

“ “ on American society?


Assess the change in knowledge from the start of the unit to the close

Guided practice and monitoring and assessments:

(Monitor orally individually or together; monitor via written language or via a task performance; monitor via group sampling or visual answers, e.g. “thumbs”. Monitor to know if the students are learning the lesson and the objectives are being met)


Questioning of “Sales Pitch” – Do the students use historical examples as justification?
Independent Practice/Assignment:

(This can be a question or problem for students to ponder on their own or in small groups or pairs. The aim is to reinforce and extend the learning beyond the lesson and ideally into real world settings.)


“Sales Pitch” presentation
** Allow for IEP students to give presentation in smaller setting (i.e., Special Education Resource Hour)
Closure:

(Statements or actions by you that help students make sense out of what has just been taught, to help form a coherent picture, to eliminate confusion and frustration, and to reinforce major points to be learned)


Define the Second Industrial Revolution – What do we know about it know?

What impact did the Second Industrial Revolution have on business?

“ “ on labor?



“ “ on American society?
Reflection:

(What worked and didn’t work – for whom and why? What are instructional next steps abased on the data from this plan?)


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