Laurel Newman Literacy Project



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Laurel Newman

Literacy Project





Alternative Text Project

GLE: 3a.F.5

Investigate the causes and consequences of Westward Expansion, including:

a. Texas and the Mexican War

b. Oregon Territory

c. California Gold Rush


NONWHITE
Yep, L. (2000). The journal of Wong Ming-Chung: A Chinese miner, California, 1852.
New York, NY: Scholastic Inc.
This book is about a young Chinese boy that manages to make it from China to California to join
his uncle for the California Gold Rush. Students can learn about how immigrants were treated
during the 1850’s and that things weren’t always great.

WOMAN
Sonneborn, L. (2005). Women of the American west. New York, NY: Franklin Watts.


This book describes the life of a woman during Westward Expansion. It shows how hard women
had to work to keep their families going. It is a great view into what women’s lives were like on
the trail and after families made the move West.

Levy, J. (1992). They saw the elephant: women in the California gold rush. Norman, Ok:


Publishing Division of the Oklahoma University by arrangement with The Shoe String

Press, Inc.


This book gives an overview of what women had to deal with during Westward Expansion. The
book is very detailed and gives lots of information from a woman’s perspective.

MAGAZINE


Solnit, R. (2006). Winged mercury and the golden calf. Orion Magazine, September/October.
This article talks about the downside to Westward Expansion. When most people think about it they think about the gold rush. Most people don’t know about how rough the conditions were and the last negative impact Westward Expansion caused.

Thornton, S. (2011). After the gold rush: Migration of gold-seekers helped shape California’s

future. National Geographic online, Retrieved from: http://www.nationalgeographic.com /search/?proxyreload=1&search=S.+Thornton+2011+After+the+gold+rush%3A+migration+of+gold-seekers
NEWSPAPER

History watch: 150th anniversary of the California gold rush. (1998, Jan 30). Orange County


Register. Retrieved from
http://search.proquest.com/docview/273049215?accountid=12570

This article gives an overview of how the California Gold Rush started. It gives a detailed history


of the gold rush.
Hardship and heroism: Oregon trail still inspires. (1993, May 03). Denver Post (Pre-1997
Fulltext). Retrieved from
http://search.proquest.com/docview/291322353?accountid=12570
This article talks about how the Oregon Trail is still inspiring to people even today.

NONFICTION BOOKS


Landau, E. The Oregon Trail. (2006). New York, NY: Children’s Press.
This book is about people who moved West in the 1840’s. It talks about the hardships on the
trail, why people wanted to move, what life was like on the trail, and what it was like when
people actually got to where they were going.
Sonneborn, L. (2005). Women of the American West. New York, NY: Franklin Watts.
This book describes the life of a woman during Westward Expansion. It shows how hard women
had to work to keep their families going. It is a great view into what women’s lives were like on
the trail and after families made the move West.
Calabro, M. (1999). The perilous journey of the Donner party. New York, NY: Clarion Books.
This book teaches students about the hardships of moving West. The Donner party got stuck due

to winter weather conditions in the harsh winter in the Sierra Nevada mountains. Not everyone


made it and those that did had to resort to desperate measures to survive. The Donner party was
half children and so the book is told from their perspective.
NOVELS
Woodruff, E. (1994). Dear Levi: letters from the Overland Trail. New York, NY: Random
House Children’s Books.
The book is about a young boy who joins the wagon train headed for California. He tells his
story through letters that he writes home to his brother Levi. Students can learn a lot from the
perspective of a 12-year-old boy.
Stamper, J. (2002). California or bust! New York, NY: Scholastic Inc.
This book is about a young man who writes letters home to his family to tell them about the
excitement and hardships traveling West. He wants to go there to look for gold.
Burgan, M. The story of Levi’s. (2002). New York, NY: Scholastic Inc.
This is a great success story about an immigrant named Levi Strauss who created a business
during the California Gold Rush. It’s great proof that the success of the California Gold Rush is
what people did for the area and not so much the gold. The lasting effects of the gold rush are
still evident today.

Goldberg, J. Westward journey. Available from



http://www.readinga-z.com/projectable/book.php?id=1055&lang=1&type=book

This story is about a young man who is moving west and a family he helps. It also shows how hard the journey was and some of the dangers of a wagon train like a stampede and someone getting sick.


POEM
Whitman, W. (2007). Pioneers! o pioneers! In Leaves of grass. Radford, VA: Wilder
Publications.
This poem is about the people or pioneers that decided to chase a dream and move West. The
poem praises the people who moved West and made America what it is.

GRAPHIC NOVEL


Young, F., Lasky, D. (2011). Oregon Trail: the road to destiny. Seattle, WA: Sasquatch Books.
This graphic novel is written in the form of a comic book. The book is written from the point of
view of Rebecca, an eleven year old girl. Her family is moving from Baltimore, Maryland
because they want a change. Students can relate to Rebecca because she is young.

PICTURE BOOKS


Friedman, M. (2010). The California Gold Rush. Canada: Children’s Press.
This book gives facts about the California Gold Rush and the journey to get to it. It has pictures and lots of fun and interesting facts. It gives information about how life was before, during, and after the gold rush.

Levine, E. (1986). If you traveled West in a covered wagon. New York, NY: Scholastic Inc.

This book is set up for teachers and students to have discussions. The book is written in question and answer format. Students could work together reading the questions, discussing their answers, and then reading what people really did.
WEBSITES
California’s untold stories gold rush. (1998). Retrieved from http://museumca.org/goldrush/
This is a fun interactive website for students to explore different aspects of the gold rush.

Land of golden dreams; California in the gold rush decade 1848-1858. (2000). Retrieved
from http://www.huntington.org/Education/GoldRush/game/index.htm
This is a fun interactive website that students can use to follow the journey of a young Chinese
immigrant boy who is traveling to California. There is also an interactive journey of a young
American girl who is traveling by covered wagon. Students will enjoy learning through this
website.

Friedman, M. (2010). The California gold rush. Canada: Children’s Press.


GLE:

3a.F.5


Investigate the causes and consequences of Westward Expansion, including:

a. Texas and the Mexican War

b. Oregon Territory

c. California Gold Rush


Common Core Standard
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.5.4a Read grade-level text with purpose and understanding.

Closed Word Sort


Please sort the following words into the categories of people of the California Gold Rush and things of the California Gold Rush.

Words:
Californios panning

culture pioneers

discrimination prospectors

forty-niners revolted

gold stagecoaches

gold fever territory

gold rush

hydraulic

miners




Words that have to do with people of the California Gold Rush.

Words that have to do with things or places for the California Gold Rush.

Californios

culture


discrimination

forty-niners

miners

pioneers


prospectors

revolted


gold

gold fever

gold rush

hydraulic

panning

stagecoaches



territory

Closed word sorts are great for teachers to use before a lesson or after. I would use it before to get an idea of what my students know or thought about a certain topic. This way I could see where they were in their background knowledge. I would use a closed word sort probably more often after I taught a lesson to see what my students learned. If they clearly aren’t placing words in the right category then I would know that maybe I didn’t teach the lesson well enough. I could then go back and try again with a new strategy.



Vocabulary Self-Awareness Chart

The California Gold Rush

California’s untold stories gold rush. (1998). Retrieved February 9, 2013, retrieved from
http://museumca.org/goldrush/

SS GLE: 3a.F.5

Investigate the causes and consequences of Westward Expansion, including:

a. Texas and the Mexican War

b. Oregon Territory

c. California Gold Rush




CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.5.4 Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 5 topic or subject area
Student Directions:

  1. Examine the list of words you have written in the first column

  2. Put a “+” next to each word you know well, and give an accurate example and definition of the word.  Your definition and example must relate to the unit of study.

  3. Place a “check” next to any words for which you can write only a definition or an example, but not both.

  4. Place a “?“ next to words that are new to you.

  5. Add any additional words you feel are important to know or are unfamiliar to you.

You will use this chart throughout the unit.  By the end of the unit should have the entire chart completed.  Because you will be revising this chart, write in pencil.  

Word

+



-

Definition

Example

Lure

+







Anything that attracts or entices.

The thought of getting rich lured people to California.

Exhibition

+







A showing or presenting for viewing.

The local museum has an exhibition on the California Gold Rush.

Frenzied

+







Wildly excited or enthusiastic.

Many people started their move to California in a frenzied way but as time when on and reality set in people were less excited about the journey.

Humanity

+







All human beings collectively.

With everyone moving to California for gold it seemed like all of humanity must have known about it.

Legacy

+







Anything handed down from the past.

The people who moved to California and started business created a legacy in the San Francisco area of California.

Commemorate

+







To serve as a memorial or a reminder.

The museum is commemorating the anniversary of the California Gold Rush with its new exhibit.

Invaded
















Gamut
















Commodity
















Scarce
















Momentous
















Archaeologist
















Artifacts
















Maritime
















Immigrants
















Model the process of using this chart for students prior to the reading. After modeling, have the students fill out the chart. Students should continue to fill out the chart and revise their responses while they read the book and again after. This will allow students to monitor their knowledge of the terms/concepts throughout the study. The classroom teacher can also monitor student responses throughout the study.

Question Answer Relationship (QAR)

APA Reference(s)


California’s untold stories gold rush. (1998). Retrieved from, http://museumca.org/goldrush/

Content GLE/s

GLE: 3a.F.5

Investigate the causes and consequences of Westward Expansion, including:

a. Texas and the Mexican War

b. Oregon Territory

c. California Gold Rush
CCSS – College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Reading.

Standard #1: Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.


Student directions:

Go to the above website. Click on the Gold Fever button and follow the arrows after reading each page. When you are finished answer the following questions.




IN THE TEXT

Question

Answer

Right There questions (2)

(think who is, where is, list, when is, how many, when did, name, what kind of-Remember that the answer will be in one location in the text)



1.

Who discovered gold that triggered the California Gold Rush?


James Marshall






2.

In what year and where was the gold discovered?


1848, at John Sutter’s mill.



Think and Search questions (2)

(require students to "search" through the entire passage they read to find information)



1.

Summarize how the Gold Rush in California began.



John Sutter hired James Marshall to build a saw mill on his land. One morning in January James noticed something glittering and he picked it up. He tried to smash it and break it but couldn’t because it was gold. Word got out that there was gold in California and people starting going there to find it and get rich.




2.

Find two examples in the text that show gold was important to people.






  1. Enormous fortunes could be made in a few weeks. People flocked to California.

  2. President Polk confirmed that gold was found in California. The world responded and many people started moving from all over the world to California hoping to find gold too.

IN YOUR HEAD







Author and You questions (1)

(require students to answer with information not in the text; however, students must read the text material to understand what the question is asking then use the information from the text and explain what you know or have experienced)

1.

How did the California Gold Rush change America, and what would America be like today if the gold rush had happened somewhere in the Midwest? Use at least 2 pieces of evidence from the text to support your answer.



See sample rubric below.

Sample response:

The California Gold Rush changed America forever. People moved there from across the United States as well as from all over the world. Those people brought goods and services to the area. The people, goods, and services are what made the area in California what it is. It is very diverse and people still go there for more opportunities. If the gold rush had happened somewhere in the Midwest, our area would probably be more populated than California. We would probably have more of a diverse culture. We would probably have a lot more varieties of food. California may not have been as popular as it is now. We could have Hollywood right here in Missouri.


On Your Own questions (1)

(can be answered with information from the students' background knowledge and do not require reading the text

1.

(Example questions:

If you had to pack up and move somewhere to get a better job or more opportunities, where would you go? Would you be excited to move? (You can’t use California & try to pick another country).


Sample response-use rubric below

If I had to move away from Missouri to get a better job and have more opportunities I would want to go to somewhere in Asia. Maybe I would go to China. It seems like they are becoming more advanced with technology than the United States and I want to be up on technology. It could be hard to get a job there though because it is so over populated. I don’t think I would want to stay there forever but long enough to learn some new things and have some great job experience. I would be excited to move there for a few years. It would be hard to leave my family but with technology like Skype I could keep in touch with them.


Rubric for Author and Me (adjust your rubric to match your question)



4

3

2

1

Student states how the gold rush changed America. At least two pieces of information from the text are used to support the answer. The student thoroughly explains background knowledge or experiences to further support their answer.

Student states how the gold rush changed America. At least one piece of information from the text is used to support the answer and the student uses some background knowledge or experience to further explain and support their answer.

Student states how the gold rush changed America and uses at least one piece of information from the text OR uses background knowledge/experiences to support and explain their answer.


Student states how the gold rush changed America but does not use information from the text or personal knowledge/experience to support or explain.

Rubric for On My Own (adjust your rubric to match your question)



4

3

2

1

Student chose a place to move to other than California. They explained options and reasons for their choice. Student states if they would be excited for their choice.

The student chose a place to move to other than California and provided at least two reasons for their choice.

Student chose a place to move to, California or somewhere else. They provided reasons for moving.

Student failed to pick a new place to move to or did not give reasons why they would move there.

When and why I would use this strategy


I would use this strategy after I taught my students a lesson on the California Gold Rush. It is a great review for them to do this assignment. It has higher order questions at the end so students can take their learning further.
Graphic Organizer

Goldberg, J. Westward journey. Available from



http://www.readinga-z.com/projectable/book.php?id=1055&lang=1&type=book
Common Core Standards
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.5.2 Determine two or more main ideas of a text and explain how they are supported by key details; summarize the text.
Complete the graphic organizer as you reread Westward Journey.
Example of Graphic Organizer is in other attached document.
A graphic organizer is great for students to do while they read a text, when they reread a text, or after they have read one. They are great to help students pay attention to what they are reading. They are also great for students to do as a review. Teachers can also see how much a student learned while they read when they use a graphic organizer.

Shared Reading Artifact
Text
Goldberg, J. Westward journey. Available from

http://www.readinga-z.com/projectable/book.php?id=1055&lang=1&type=book
GLE: 3a.F.5

Investigate the causes and consequences of Westward Expansion, including:

a. Texas and the Mexican War

b. Oregon Territory

c. California Gold Rush

Common Core Standard


CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.5.4a Read grade-level text with purpose and understanding.


Text

Teacher Commentary During Think Aloud

Strategies Modeled/Practiced

Westward Journey

Page 3


As I look at the first page I see a picture of a map. The map is of Missouri. I wonder if this book is about Missouri. It’s called Westward Journey so maybe it’s about someone moving west from Missouri.

Predicting and using the pictures as clues. This is getting the students interested in the story. They will want to see if the prediction is correct.

1848, west of Independence, Missouri

How in all creation did I land here? thought eleven-year-old Jessie Townsend. The wheels of his family’s covered wagon rolled over the uneven ruts that marked the beginning of a 2,000-mile wagon train journey west. Oregon Country promised flowers that bloomed all year, free land ripe for farming, and rivers and streams overflowing with fish; but none of this bounty mattered to Jessie. His closest friends and favorite fishing hole remained in Ohio.

So from this reading I see that my prediction was kind of right. The story is about someone moving west. They are from Ohio though. The book must pick up from when they are in Missouri. I know that a lot of westward travelers came through Missouri. 2,000 miles is so far. That must have taken a very long time to travel by wagon. I know that many people saw the west as a fresh start with an abundance of land and resources.

Activating background knowledge. Helps get students to start putting themselves in the place of the young boy Jessie.

With a clenched jaw and downward-fixed eyes, Jessie jostled around-back and forth, up and down-on one of the 36 wagons slowly rolling west, and refused to see the beauty of the wide-open spaces. Why did we ever leave Ohio? he thought as he leaped down from the wagon. With slumping shoulders, he then grabbed a pebble from his shoe and forcefully flung it to the ground.

Jessie seems very unhappy to be going west. I can understand how he feels. It would be hard to pack up and move. To have to leave everything that you have ever known. I don’t think I would be enjoying the trip either.

Reading with purpose and students can put themselves in the character’s shoes.

This strategy is great to use for many different lessons in the classroom. I will definitely use it with my students. It activates their prior knowledge and helps them to predict. Predicting gets them motivated to read on and see if their predictions were correct.

Constructed Response for Westward Journey

GLE: 3a.F.5

Investigate the causes and consequences of Westward Expansion, including:

a. Texas and the Mexican War

b. Oregon Territory

c. California Gold Rush
Common Core ELA Standard

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.5.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.5.1 Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.5.2 Determine two or more main ideas of a text and explain how they are supported by key details; summarize the text.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.5.3 Explain the relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in the text.

Goldberg, J. Westward journey. Available from



http://www.readinga-z.com/projectable/book.php?id=1055&lang=1&type=book

Read the passage and answer the questions that follow.



Passage from Westward Journey

As Bessie walked beside the wagon a few days later, she began to feel dizzy, and the feeling worsened as the day grew longer. Uh-oh, my stomach is doing flip-flops, she thought. And my head is beginning to feel like flour kneaded into pie dough. Bessie didn’t want to be treated like a baby and be confined to the wagon- so she hid her illness as long as possible.


At dinnertime, however, when the wagon train set up camp for the night, Bessie could no longer fake feeling well. When her mother, Sarah, caught a glimpse of her in the firelight, she immediately felt Bessie’s forehead and realized that her daughter was burning up with fever.

“Go lie down, Bessie,” Sarah ordered. “I’ll bring you a cupful of bitters to drink. I want you lying on that mattress until you’re feeling better.”


“Yes, ma’am, but what about my responsibilities to Wag? Who will take care of him?”
“I’ll feed him and give him water,” Sarah said.
“Yes, but who will entertain him? He’s used to me playing with him every day.”
“I’m sorry, Bessie, but none of us has the time to watch him or play with him,” said her father, William. “Don’t worry. He’ll be fine.”
That night, Bessie slept fitfully as her fever climbed even higher. Plaguing her sleep were nightmares of Wag being lonely, wandering the vast prairie, and searching for her from far behind the wagon train.
Two mornings later as the wagon train prepared to break camp, Jessie walked up to Bessie’s father.

“Uh, pardon me, sir, where is the little girl who plays with the dog? Is she in good health?”


“I’m afraid our daughter is ill with fever, so she’s abed inside the wagon.”
“Oh, sorry,” said Jessie apologetically, knowing others in the wagon train were suffering from a similar affliction. “Where’s her dog?” he asked.
“He sleeps next to her most of the day,” answered Bessie’s father.
“I mean no disrespect, but is he getting any exercise?” Jessie asked. “Is anyone paying attention to him when he’s rambling around?”
“We’re too busy to worry about that, I’m afraid,” said Sarah as she reloaded the breakfast supplies.
“Well, maybe I could come by and tent to his exercise each day,” offered Jessie, “at least until your daughter is feeling better.”
“Well, that would be very kind of you,” said Sarah. “Bessie would truly appreciate your taking an interest in Wag.”
“Oh, it’s no trouble, ma’am,” said Jessie. “I’ll come back later this afternoon to tend to him.”
That night, Bessie’s illness became as severe as her parents had ever seen. Chills shook Bessie’s body as Sarah spoon-fed her all the medicine they had to make her well. It seemed as though nothing improved her condition. Earlier that morning, an elderly woman had died from sickness.
Sarah could not bear the thought of losing her child. Bessie awoke delirious several times in the night but didn’t notice her mother’s tear-stained cheeks. About an hour before dawn, Bessie’s fever broke. Sarah’s shoulders shook as she wept with joy, and William comforted her.

Westward Journey




  1. Bessie clearly felt sick on the trail. Why did she keep it a secret from her parents for as long as she could? Quote text from the passage to support your answer.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________




  1. Imagine you were part of a wagon train heading west and you got sick. Would you try to keep it a secret? Give at least two reasons to support your answer.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________




  1. Based on the text, in your opinion, would it be easier to be sick in the time that Bessie was or here in our modern day? Give at least two reasons to support your answer.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________




  1. Please complete a Venn diagram for the differences in getting sick out on the Westward trail and in a city or town. Use at least five differences for each and two similarities.


  1. In a few sentences, summarize the main idea of the passage. Use at least one quote.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________


Circle the letter of the correct answer for Questions 6 and 7.

  1. What is the author’s main purpose of the passage from Westward Journey?

  1. to tell about the relationship between a young girl and her dog

  2. to make the reader feel sad that the girl got sick

  3. to inform the reader that getting sick out on the trail was serious and could be deadly

  4. to show that Bessie’s parents really care about her

  1. Why did Bessie’s mother make her go rest in the wagon as soon as she figured out Bessie was sick?

  1. Bessie’s mother didn’t want anyone to know her daughter was sick

  2. Bessie needed all the rest she could get because her parents didn’t have much medicine and couldn’t take her to a doctor

  3. Bessie was being punished for getting sick

  4. Bessie’s mother was mad at her because now she has to take care of Bessie’s dog

Now you will write a paper in response to a writing prompt. First, read the prompt in the box below.

You will have 45 minutes for your prewriting activities such as brainstorming, listing, outlining, and writing a rough draft. Use the pages labeled “prewriting” to record your ideas and your rough draft.

You will then have another 45 minutes to write your final paper. Use the pages labeled “final paper” to record your completed work.



In Westward Journey, Bessie’s family was moving out West. Write about what your family might do if they had to move somewhere new. Then write a letter to Bessie and tell her about your families experience and how it is different from hers.



Prewriting

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Final Paper

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Grade 5 Scoring Guide



Westward Journey
Question 1, CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.5.1

2pts The response includes a quote from the text with an explanation of how it supports the answer.

Example – Bessie kept her illness a secret because she didn’t want to have to be cooped up in the wagon. “Bessie didn’t want to be treated like a baby and be confined to the wagon- so she hid her illness as long as possible.”

1pt The response includes the reason for Bessie hiding her illness but does not include a quote.

Example – Bessie didn’t want to have to sit in the wagon all day so she hid her illness from her parents.

0pts Other

Question 2, CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.5.4

2 pts The response includes an answer for the question and at least two reasons from the text to support the reason.

Example – I would try to keep it a secret if I was sick and in a wagon train. I wouldn’t want to have to ride in the wagon all the time. I also wouldn’t want my parents to worry about me because they have plenty to worry about already. When Sarah found out Bessie was sick she made her lay down on a mattress in the wagon, and her parents worried very much about her.

1 pt The response includes an answer to the question but has no evidence from the text to support the reasons.

Example – I would keep it a secret if I was sick out in the wagon train because I wouldn’t want to have to ride in the wagon. I would also want to be able to take care of my dog.

0 pts Other


Question 3, CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.5.2

2 pts The response includes an answer to the question with two supporting details.

Example – It is easier to be sick here in the modern day because people can usually easily go to the doctor. There is usually plenty of medicine available to help you get better quickly. If you were out in the wagon train it would be scary to be sick. There wasn’t a lot of medicine to go around and there weren’t doctors that you could easily go and see.

1 pt The response includes an answer to the question and has less than two supporting reasons.

Example – It is easier to be sick in a city or town than on a journey west.

0 pts Other

Question 4, CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.5.3

2 pts The Venn diagram has five differences for each side and two similarities.

Example – Westward Trail: Not much medicine available, you can easily die from a curable illness, hardly if any vaccines, if you die from sickness you most likely would be buried on the trail, no doctors. Town or city: doctors and hospitals, vaccines, medicine available all around town, nurses to take care of you, comfort of your home when you are sick. Similarities: Family still worries when you are sick, mom still takes care of you when you are sick.

1 pt The Venn diagram has one to four differences for each side and at least one similarity.

0 pts Other
Question 5, CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.5.2

2 pts The response includes an accurate summary of the passage.

Example – One day while traveling in a wagon train, Bessie started to feel sick. She decided to keep it a secret from her parents because she didn’t want to be treated like a baby and get stuck riding in the wagon. Sarah, Bessie’s mother figured out that she had a fever and made her go lay down in the wagon. Bessie was worried about who would take care and play with her dog. Her parents didn’t have time to play with the dog because they were busy with other things. A young boy that is also in the wagon train offers to help with the dog. Bessie’s illness gets worse and her parents get very worried. They give her all the medicine they have. Other people in the wagon train are sick and an elderly woman died from her sickness while Bessie was sick. Eventually her fever breaks and her mother weeps with joy. Bessie gets better and is thankful for the boy Jessie for taking care of her dog Wag.

1 pts The response includes a partial summary and does not included many details.

Example – A young girl in a wagon train gets sick. Her parents worry about her. She worries about her dog. Lots of people are sick and one of them dies. Bessie gets better.

0 pts Other


Question 6, CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.5.2

1 pt C
Question 7, CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.5.2



1 pt B
WP Use state writing scoring guide for grade 5.


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