Kurtz, Nicole English IV honors-Literature Circles 03/2011



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Kurtz, Nicole English IV Honors-Literature Circles 03/2011

English IV Honors Fourth Quarter Literature Project

Literary Analysis of a British Novel– Literature Circle
Focus: Throughout the academic school year we have studied English works from the Anglo-Saxon period through to the Victorian period. As we near the end of the academic school year, I want you to utilize your knowledge of British literature to read, analyze and discuss a British work.
Literature Circles-In a group of three you will read a British work (a play, a novel, or a series of short stories). Ms. Kurtz will need to approve your choice. Your group will analyze the work, discuss how it relates to British literature, and present the work to the class. The project will depend solely on your group members. Failure to complete the project on time or failure to complete your role in the project will result in a failing grade for you, not necessarily your group.
There are four (4) types of grades with this project.

  1. Daily grades- depending on the role within your group, you will have a daily grade/assignment you are responsible for completing. Even if you are absent, it is your responsibility to complete your daily assignment.

  2. Homework grades- There will be a weekly homework grade that is your responsibility. Even if you are absent, it is your responsibility to complete your homework assignment.

  3. Presentation Grade- Your group will present their literary analysis of the British work to the class. Your participation is required. Due May 2, 2011*

  4. Essay Grade- Individually, you will write a literary analysis of the story. This is NOT a summary of the work, but an in-depth analysis of the story’s theme and why this work is important to British literature. You will need four (4) outside resources that support your analysis of the work. Two of those sources must be from a print source (a journal, a magazine, or a literary review). Due May 3, 2011.


Literature Circle Process:

1. Choose one of the available texts to read.

2. I’ll arrange the class in literature circle groups, based upon the group’s story choice.

3. Literature Circle Meetings

• Decide how much of the text to read and which role each of you will fill during the next meeting. *Be sure to keep up with the handouts. They have due dates and how you’ll be scored.

• Make sure you have a copy of the Literature Circle Role sheet. Know your role!

• Read your text and prepare for literature circle meetings.

• Be open and make sure that everyone has a chance to participate.



• Complete the daily activities—See chart and rubric for assignments.

Roles: You will select a role and it will rotate weekly between all group members. Depending on the role you select, your assignments will align accordingly. These roles are not stationary. Each group member must complete all the roles at least once. If there are questions, please see Ms. Kurtz.
Discussion Director- Your job is to develop a list of questions that your group might want to discuss about this part of the book. Don’t worry about the small details; your task is to help people talk over the big ideas in the reading and share their reactions. Usually the best discussion questions come from your own thoughts, feelings, and concerns as you read. You can list them below during or after your reading. You may also use some of the general questions below to develop topics to your group.
Literary Luminary- Your job is to locate a few special sections or quotations in the text for your group to talk over. The idea is to help people go back to some especially interesting, powerful, funny, puzzling, or important sections of the reading and think about them more carefully. Also look for literary devices and make connections to the six elements of fiction. As you decide which passages or paragraphs are worth going back to, make a note why you picked each one and consider some plans for how they should be shared. You can read passages aloud yourself, ask someone else to read them, or have people read them silently and then discuss. Remember, the purpose is to suggest material for discussion.
Vocabulary Enricher/Word Wizard- The words a writer chooses are an important ingredient of the author’s craft. Your job is to be on the lookout for a few words that have special meaning in today’s reading selection.
Connector (If there is a fourth member of the group): Your job is to find connections between the book and you, and between the book and the wider world.



Literature Circle Daily Activities

All Daily Activities are due at the END of class.

Roles:

Discussion Director

Vocabulary

Enricher

Literary Luminary

Connector

April 5-Activity #1

Complete the discussion question handout.

Complete the vocabulary enricher handout.

Complete the Literary luminary handout.

Complete the Connector handout.

April 6-Activity #2

Create ten questions that will help your group understand the text you’re reading.

Locate ten new vocabulary words and their definitions that your group struggled with/learned today.
Write the words in context (meaning how they appeared in the story).

List five things your group struggled with today when trying to understand the passage.
(Is it plot? Diction—language? Main idea? Point of view? Etc.)


Complete the Connector handout.

April 7-Activity #3

Create ten new questions that will help your group understand the text you’re reading.

Locate ten more vocabulary words and their definitions that your group struggled with/learned today.
Write the words in context (meaning how they appeared in the story).

List five things your group struggled with today when trying to understand the passage. Are they same as yesterday?
(Is it plot? Diction—language? Main idea? Point of view? Etc.)

Complete the Connector handout.

April 8-Activity #4

In what ways did you help your group discuss the characteristics of the story?

Which of the vocabulary words did your group use the most in discussion? How can you incorporate some of those words into your presentation?

How did you enlighten your group’s discussion and understanding of the text today?

Complete the Connector handout.

Week #2













April 11-Activity #1

Complete the discussion question handout.

Complete the vocabulary enricher handout.

Complete the Literary luminary handout.

Complete the Connector handout.

April 12-Activity #2

Create ten questions that will help your group understand the text you’re reading.

Locate ten new vocabulary words and their definitions that your group struggled with/learned today.
Write the words in context (meaning how they appeared in the story).

List five things your group struggled with today when trying to understand the passage.
(Is it plot? Diction—language? Main idea? Point of view? Etc.)


Complete the Connector handout.

April 13-Activity #3

Create a double-bubble map of two of the protagonists in your novel. Discuss the differences and similarities.

Select three of your hardest, most challenging vocabulary words. Create a Frayer Model with your group.

Begin working on the plot diagram. Complete the exposition and two rising action events.

Find real world examples of the conflict in your story and share with the group.

April 14-Activity #4

Select one major conflict in your story and discuss with your group how that conflict may be resolved.

Find five of your vocabulary words in the context of the novel. Share with the group what the words reveal about the plot, character, etc.

Using an outside source, share a historical account or historical information about the author, the story, or the time period your story was written.

Find similarities to another work and your story. Share with the group.

Roles:

Discussion Director

Vocabulary

Enricher

Literary Luminary

Connector

April 15-Activity #5

Summarize the discussions you’ve had with your group this week. What are your challenges? What have you done well?

Reflect on the new vocabulary your group used this week. Which word do you feel you truly can use in every day language? Which can you not? Why?

Reflect on the chapters your group read this week. How can you improve their understanding of the text? What areas does your group need to re-read?

Do you feel a connection to the story you’re reading? Why? Why not?

Week #3













April 18-Activity #1

Complete the discussion question handout.

Complete the vocabulary enricher handout.

Complete the Literary luminary handout.

Complete the Connector handout.

April 19-Activity #2

Create ten questions that will help your group understand the text you’re reading.

Locate ten new vocabulary words and their definitions that your group struggled with/learned today.
Write the words in context (meaning how they appeared in the story).

List five things your group struggled with today when trying to understand the passage.
(Is it plot? Diction—language? Main idea? Point of view? Etc.)


Complete the Connector handout.

April 20-Activity #3

Create a double-bubble map of two new characters in your novel. Discuss the differences and similarities.

Illustrate five of your new vocabulary words in detail. Be sure to incorporate aspects of the words in connection with your novel.

Continuing working on the plot diagram. Complete two rising action events and the climax.

Think of songs that might serve as a soundtrack to the story you’re reading. List them. Explain why you selected them.

April 21-Activity #4

Select one hot button issue that occurs in the story and discuss the results of that issue with the group. How do the characters react to it?

Complete the vocabulary enricher handout.

Complete the luminary handout.

If this story was a movie, who would play the main characters? The secondary characters?

April 22-Activity #5

Summarize the discussions you’ve had with your group this week. What are your challenges? What have you done well?

Reflect on the new vocabulary your group used this week. Which word do you feel you truly can use in every day language? Which can you not? Why?

Reflect on the chapters your group read this week. How can you improve their understanding of the text? What areas does your group need to re-read?

Do you feel a connection to the story you’re reading? Why? Why not?

Week #4













April 25-Activity #1

Complete the discussion question handout.

Complete the vocabulary enricher handout.

Complete the Literary luminary handout.

Complete the Connector handout.

April 26-Activity #2

Create ten questions that will help your group understand the text you’re reading.

Locate ten new vocabulary words and their definitions that your group struggled with/learned today.
Write the words in context (meaning how they appeared in the story).

List five things your group struggled with today when trying to understand the passage.
(Is it plot? Diction—language? Main idea? Point of view? Etc.)


Complete the Connector handout.

April 27-Activity #3

Discuss/predict the ending of the novel. Were there any surprises? Why or why not?

Out of the list of new vocabulary words, create a poem that uses 10 of those words. Share with your group.

Continuing working on the plot diagram. Complete four falling action events and the resolution.

Connect an event that occurs in the novel to a celebrity’s similar event. Share.

April 28-Activity #4

Discuss the themes that occurred in the story. Remember, theme is the author’s message/life lesson or moral.

Discuss the word choice the author used in your novel. What did it reveal about the characters’ personalities?

Review the entire plot diagram with your group members and add, revise as necessary.

Did your group feel a connection to a particular character? Why or why not?

April 29-Activity #5

Summarize the discussions you’ve had with your group this week. What are your challenges? What have you done well?

Reflect on the new vocabulary your group used this week. Which word do you feel you truly can use in every day language? Which can you not? Why?

Reflect on the chapters your group read this week. How can you improve their understanding of the text? What areas does your group need to re-visit?

Do you feel a connection to the story you finished reading? Why? Why not?


Essay Rubric- Individually, you will write a literary analysis of the story. This is NOT a summary of the work, but an in-depth analysis of the story’s theme and why this work is important to British literature. You will need four (4) resources. Two of which must be from a print source.


Criteria

4

3

2

1

The claim

I make a claim and explain it in my introduction.

I make a claim but don't explain it in my introduction.

My claim is buried, confused and/or unclear.

I don't say what my argument or claim is.

Reasons in support of the claim

I give clear and accurate reasons in support of my opinion.

I give reasons in support of my claim but I may overlook important reasons.

I give 1 or 2 weak reasons that don't support my claim and/or irrelevant or confusing reasons.

I do not give convincing reasons in support of my claim.

Use of sources

&

Documentation



I use sources to support, extend, and inform, but not substitute my writing or the development of idea.

I combine material from a variety of sources. I utilize four sources or more. Two are from print sources. I don’t overuse quotes.



I use sources to support, extend, and inform, but not substitute my writing or development of idea.

I don’t overuse quotes, but I may not always conform to required style manual (APA).



I used three to four sources. Only one is a print source.


I use relevant sources but lack in variety of sources and/or the skillful combination of sources. APA format isn’t correct.

The quotations & paraphrases may be too long and/or inconsistently referenced.



I used two or less sources. Only one is a print source.

I neglect important sources. I overuse quotations or paraphrase to substitute for my own ideas.

I don’t have APA.

I don’t have a reference page.

I lack the necessary sources. No print sources.



Organization

My writing has a compelling opening, an informative middle and a satisfying conclusion.

My writing has a beginning, middle and end. It marches along but doesn't dance.

My writing is organized but sometimes gets off topic.

My writing is aimless and disorganized.

Word choice

The words I use are striking but natural, varied and vivid.

I make routine word choices.

The words I use are often dull or uninspired or sound like I am trying too hard to impress.

I use the same words over and over and over and over. Some words may be confusing to a reader.

Tone and Voice

It sounds like I care about my opinion. I show how I think and feel about it.

My tone is OK but my paper could have been written by anyone. I need to tell more about how I think and feel.

My writing is bland or pretentious. There is either no hint of a real person in it or it sounds like I'm a fake.

My writing is too formal or too informal. It sounds like I don't like the topic of the essay.

Sentence fluency

My sentences are clear, complete, and of varying lengths.

I have well-constructed sentences.

My sentences are sometimes awkward, and/or contain run-ons and fragments.

Many run-ons, fragments and awkward phrasings make my essay hard to read.

Conventions

I use correct grammar, spelling, and punctuation.

I generally use correct conventions. I have a couple of errors I should fix.

I have enough errors in my essay to distract a reader.

Numerous errors make my paper hard to read.


British Literary Analysis Presentation



Directions: You and a partner will read a work of British literature. You will present a brief literary analysis of the work, focusing on theme, tone, and its importance to British literature. Your presentation will need to convey your analysis of the writer’s literary devices needed to present the story’s theme, discuss the story’s overall tone, and the work’s importance to British literature.

Content

4

3

2

1

Presentation

Content



Content thoroughly presents and explains the work’s theme, and importance to British literature/culture.
The plot is also summarized completely to give the audience a view of the story.

Content mostly thoroughly presents and explains the work’s theme, and importance to British literature/culture.
The plot is mostly summarized to give the audience a view of the story.

Content is somewhat presented and explained some of the work’s theme, and importance to British literature/culture.
The plot is also weakly summarized.

Content is presented and insufficiently explained. Only briefly explains theme, and importance to British literature/culture.
The plot is poorly summarized

Props

Props are polished and nicely done. The group has taken pride in their work.
Includes visual aids that excel and elevate the presentation.

Props are done, but are not polished. The group has completed the basics.
Includes visual aids that are apart, but do not add to the presentation.

Props seem rushed.

Include one or two visual aids.



No visual aids.

Grammar and Spelling

Project show has one or two misspellings and/or grammatical errors.

Project show has no more than three misspellings and/or grammatical errors.

Project show has four or more spelling errors and/or grammatical errors.

Project show is riddled with errors and is thus, difficult to read.

Presentation

Speaking

All group members spoke loudly and clearly.
Each student maintains eye contact with the class.

Most of the group members speak loudly and clearly.
Most of the students maintain eye contact with the class.

Some of the group members speak loud enough to hear.
Some struggle to maintain eye contact.

Only one group member speaks.
Doesn’t maintain eye contact.

Timely

Presentation was presented on or before 05/03/11

Presentation was on 05/03/11 but not during class time.

Presentation was a day late (5/04)

Failed to present.

Total Score:















A List of Approved British Works



(You may select a work from this list)
1984 by George Orwell

Animal Farm by George Orwell

A Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

The Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis

Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling

Paradise Lost by John Milton

A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens

Macbeth by William Shakespeare

Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad

Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte

Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte

Mrs. Dalloway by Virgina Wolf

Doctor Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson

The Time Machine by H.G. Wells

Grendel by John Gardner

Emma by Jane Austen

The Invisible Man by H.G. Wells

The Hound of the Baskervilles by Arthur Conan Doyle

Great Expectation by Charles Dickens

Atonement by Ian McEwan

A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess

Angela’s Ashes by Frank McCourt

Dracula by Bram Stoker

The Taming of the Shrew by William Shakespeare

Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austin

The Remains of the Day by Kazua Ishiguro

Gulliver’s Travels by Jonathan Swift

A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams

Lord of the Flies by William Golden


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