Kennesaw state university undergraduate proposal new Course



Download 77.86 Kb.
Date25.05.2016
Size77.86 Kb.
#67578

KENNESAW STATE UNIVERSITY
UNDERGRADUATE PROPOSAL
New Course (General Education)




I. Proposed Information
Course Prefix and Number: AMST 1102

Course Title: American Identities

Credit Hours (format should be # - # - #): 3-0-3

Prerequisites: none


Course Description for the Catalog:
[AMST 1102] explores what it means to be “American.” Examining “American Identities” from local and global perspectives, and through a variety of disciplinary frameworks, this course focuses on the diverse forms of “American Identity,” as well as the social and cultural histories that have shaped these identities. Students examine their own and others’ identities. Students gain knowledge and skills related to intercultural relations through various methods that include research, reading, writing, performance, and class activities.
II. Justification for Course
A. Explain assessment findings, which led to course development.
Faculty within the American Studies program (housed within the Interdisciplinary Studies Department) recognized that American Studies themes and approaches are particularly well suited for addressing the newly adopted USG Core Curriculum Policy learning goals for Area B. In addition to examining “American Identities” from U.S. and global perspectives, students in this course will: develop skills in critical inquiry, writing, and introductory research methods; gain knowledge about the connections among disciplines through an interdisciplinary study of “American” identities; gain knowledge about the diversity of American cultures and peoples; and develop intercultural competencies.

     

B. Explain for Prerequisites:


  1. What is the substance of content in each prerequisite that commands its inclusion as a
    prerequisite to the proposed course? n/a     

  2. What is the desired sequence of prerequisites? n/a

  3. What is the rationale for requiring the above sequence of prerequisites? n/a

  4. How often are the required prerequisites offered? n/a     

C. Give any other justification for the course.


The interdisciplinary, local and global approaches to the topic “American Identities” involves the study of diversity and the development of cultural competence.
III. New General Education Course
Answer the following questions to explain how the new course contributes to integrated learning at KSU.

         A. Contribution to attainment of the General Education Program Learning outcomes:



  1. Identify the general and specific General Education Program learning outcomes that are addressed by this course.

Students will demonstrate that they:

  • recognize themselves as participants in a particular culture and see how this affects their experiences and values. (LG C, Humanities, Fine Arts, and Ethics)

  • understand the importance of cultural diversity in the U.S. (LG I US Perspectives)

  • understand how to interpret content of written materials on related topics from various disciplines. (LG A1 C.O.)

  • have the ability to consider and accommodate opposing points of view. (LG III, CT)

  • have the ability to identify the audience, intent, value, and disciplinary perspective of potential sources of information. (LG III, CT)




  1. Describe the activities/assignments in this course that may be used to facilitate the student’s achievement of each of the specific learning outcomes identified in A1 above.

Students will be reading a broad range of texts by diverse authors. The class discussions, online discussion board postings and reading responses will explore the rich diversity of experience in American culture. In a more formal and sustained way, students will be asked to write an essay drawing upon evidence to draw informed and evolving conclusions about the complexity of “American Identities.” The assignments ask students to synthesize the readings, discussions and texts they confront as they consider the construct of American identity within local and global contexts. The collaborative project will encourage interaction among diverse members of the group as they explore the course theme in light of different disciplines. The final oral presentation assignment develops students’ abilities to improve their oral and written communication skills, consider their audience and acknowledge opposing points of view. This course framework will accommodate different disciplinary perspectives, drawing from faculty in various disciplines.

B. How do the skills and knowledge gained in this course connect with those of other courses in the General Education Program?

The knowledge, skills and attitudes students will gain include the general education goals of improved communication skills, critical thinking, understanding U.S. and global perspectives and improved cultural competence. Thus, the course reinforces skills, knowledge, and dispositions fostered in other general education courses. This particular course makes particularly significant contributions to the General Education Program’s emphasis on diversity and interdisciplinarity.

C. How does this course provide a foundation for Upper Division Degree Programs?



This course provides the groundwork for several degree programs including: History, English, Theater and Performance Arts, Communications, Anthropology, Sociology, Gender and Women’s Studies, African American Diaspora Studies. The critical thinking skills and the diversity skills learned in this course will be valuable to students who study in any college and any major at KSU.

D. How often will this course be offered?


One section in the fall and one section in the spring semester.

E. All sections of the course will be taught with the understanding that the following apply:




  1. Purpose of the Course is to examine and analyze American culture through the theme of “American Identity.”




  1. Objectives of the Course align with the General Education outcomes for the new USG Core curriculum.




  1. Course Content is interdisciplinary, multicultural, and theme-based.

F. What instructional methodologies will be incorporated into the course to stimulate group


process and educational outcomes?


Students will practice collaboration, introductory research methods, writing and performance activities, presentation skills and analysis of a broad range of cultural products and texts, e.g., music, digital culture, advertising, landscapes, literature and drama, historical documents, and more. Methodologies will be drawn from multiple disciplines.

G. Outline the plan for continuous course assessment.


Student evaluations will be studied to identify elements of the course that need refinement. Faculty teaching the course will meet periodically to review sample syllabi and share current research. As part of ongoing evaluation of the American Studies program at KSU, faculty study groups will assess the course’s effectiveness through surveys of students who completed the course as part of their minor in American Studies. The course will be re-assessed at least once every three years.
H. Enclose a course syllabus (optional format described at the end of this document).
Sample syllabus attached.

IV. Resources and Funding Required
A. What resources will be redirected to accommodate this course?
One faculty member per semester from ISD/AMST affiliated faculty in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences.

B. Explain what items will cause additional cost to the department/school/college:

Personnel : n/a

Computer Technology : n/a

Library resources : n/a

Equipment : n/a

Space: one classroom each semester.




V. COURSE MASTER FORM

This form will be completed by the requesting department and will be sent to the Office of the Registrar once the course has been approved by the Office of the President. The form is required for all new courses.


DISCIPLINE: American Studies
COURSE NUMBER: AMST 1102
COURSE TITLE FOR LABEL: American Identities
(Note: Limit 30 spaces)
CLASS-LAB-CREDIT HOURS: 3-0-3
PREREQUISITES: n/a
Approval, Effective Semester: Spring 2012

(Note: This can be no earlier than the term after approval by the UPCC.)


Grades Allowed (Regular or S/U): regular
If course used to satisfy CPC, what areas? n/a

Learning Support Programs courses which are


required as prerequisites: n/a
APPROVED:
______________________________________________________________________
Vice President for Academic Affairs or Designee

KENNESAW STATE UNIVERSITY
UNDERGRADUATE PROPOSAL
New Course (General Education)


Course Prefix and Number: __AMST 1102________________
Responsible Department: ___ISD/AMST_________________
Proposed Effective Date: ____Spring 2012_______________


(Note: This can be no earlier than the term after approval by the UPCC.)

Signature Page


Submitted by:



 

Name Linda Stewart, Assistant Professor of English and American Studies

Date




 

 

___ Approved ___ Not Approved

_____________________________

 

Department Curriculum Committee, Date

___ Approved ___ Not Approved

_____________________________

 

Professional Teacher Education Unit Program Area*, Date

___ Approved ___ Not Approved

_____________________________

 

Department Chair, Date

___ Approved ___ Not Approved

_____________________________

 

College/School Curriculum Committee AND/OR Teacher Education Council*, Date

___ Approved ___ Not Approved

_____________________________

 

College/School Dean, Date

___ Approved ___ Not Approved

_____________________________

 

General Education Council*, Date

___ Approved ___ Not Approved

_____________________________

 

Undergraduate Policies and Curriculum Committee, Date

___ Approved ___ Not Approved

_____________________________

 

Associate VP of Academic Affairs, Date

*For curriculum proposals involving General Education courses, there should be collaboration by the Department Curriculum Committee and the General Education Council. For Teacher Preparation proposals, there should be collaboration by the Department Curriculum Committee, the Professional Teacher Education Unit (PTEU) Program Area Committee, the Teacher Education Council, and the College/School Curriculum Committee.

Form updated September 26, 2008.

LB

Professor:


Semester:
AMST 1102: American Identities

A Course in the General Education Program
Program Description: The General Education Program offers a solid, comprehensive foundational academic experience for all Kennesaw State University students. In a series of interrelated courses in the liberal arts and sciences, it provides the opportunity for them to acquire the intellectual skills and knowledge characteristic of educated persons in a diverse, global community. Thus, it prepares students for success in academic, professional, and personal arenas. Whereas the major program contributes depth to a college education in a designated specialization, the General Education Program provides breadth of understanding by introducing, connecting, and integrating a variety of disciplines.
Program Goals: The General Education Program at KSU has four goals. During the course of the program, students should demonstrate the following:

  • knowledge and understanding in the General Education areas: Humanities, Fine Arts, Science, Mathematics, Technology, Social Science, and the Essential Skills (written and quantitative skills)

  • proficiency in communication

  • skills in inquiry, critical thinking, and problem solving through scholarly and/or creative activity across the general education disciplines

  • an understanding of ethics, diversity, and a global perspective.


Course Description:

This interdisciplinary course explores what it means to be “American.” Examining “American Identities” from local and global perspectives, and through a variety of disciplinary frameworks, this course focuses on the diverse forms of “American Identity,” as well as the social and cultural histories that have shaped these identities. Students examine their own and others’ identities. Students gain knowledge and skills related to intercultural relations through various methods that include research, reading, writing, performance, and class activities.


SAMPLE SYLLABUS

AMST 1102: American Identities

AMST 1102 Semester: Spring 2012

Room and time:

Instructor: Prerequisite: None
Course description:

This interdisciplinary course explores what it means to be “American.” Examining “American Identities” from local and global perspectives, and through a variety of disciplinary frameworks, this course focuses on the diverse forms of “American Identity,” as well as the social and cultural histories that have shaped these identities. Students examine their own and others’ identities. Students gain knowledge and skills related to intercultural relations through various methods that include research, reading, writing, performance, and class activities.
Instructor information:

Name:


Office hours:

Contact information:


Course objectives:

Students will demonstrate that they:



  1. recognize themselves as participants in a particular culture and see how this affects their experiences and values. (LG C, Humanities, Fine Arts and Ethics)

  2. understand the importance of cultural diversity in the U.S. (LG I US Perspectives)

  3. understand how to interpret content of written materials on related topics from various disciplines. (LG A1 C.O.)

  4. comprehend the place of the U.S. in the diverse realm of societies across the globe. (Learning Goal II Global Perspectives)

  5. have the ability to consider and accommodate opposing points of view. (LG III, CT)

  6. have the ability to identify the audience, intent, value and disciplinary perspective of potential sources of information. (LG III, CT)


Readings, films, or plays – selections from the following:

The following are examples of course readings that a faculty member might use in the delivery of this course; print and non-print selections that meet the course objectives may vary.
Edward Albee. The American Dream.
Sherman Alexie. The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, “How to Write the Great American Indian Novel.”
Sandra Cisneros. Woman Hollering Creek.

Frederick Douglass, “Why the Colored American is not in the World’s Columbian Exposition.” Chapter 1. http://digital.library.upenn.edu/women/wells/exposition/exposition.html#I


W.E.B DuBois. The Souls of Black Folk.
Fannie Flagg. Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Café.
Firoozeh Dumas. Funny in Farsi: A Memoir of Growing Up Iranian in America

Anthony Grooms. Bombingham.


Karen Halttunen, "Groundwork: American Studies in Place--Presidential Address to the American Studies Association, November 4, 2005"
Stanley Nelson. Freedom Riders.
J. Hector St. John de Crevecoeur, Letters from an American Farmer
Frederick Jackson Turner, The Significance of the Frontier in American History.
Zitkala-Sa, “Impressions of an Indian Childhood” (essays)
Orson Wells. Citizen Kane.
In lieu of multiple primary and secondary sources, a textbook might also be selected. Examples of textbooks include:

American Identities: An Introductory Textbook. Eds. Rudnick, Lois, Judith Smith and Rachel Rubin. 2006.
Course requirements:

Faculty can choose other assignments, readings, and/or activities that realize the course objectives, and they may weight course requirements differently. Examples of typical assignments are noted below.

 

I. Class participation. In-class discussions, collaborative group activities and online postings. (20%)


II. Reading responses. Students will write informal reading responses to assigned readings, in-class material, and a broad range of texts that include, but are not limited to, novels, non-fiction, photography, poetry, music, film, performance and theater arts, multimedia, material culture and more. (20%)

Example of response paper requirements:

Response paper 1-3: Choose one of the required texts and discuss how an idea or strand in that work connects to popular culture. For example, you might describe and analyze how ideas about freedom in our readings and audio texts have been used in designer jeans marketing campaigns.

Response paper 4: In this approximately 500 word response paper, you’ll collect and analyze evidence of casual discourse (remember our discussion of “discourse”!) that circulates particular concepts of America or expectations about being an American. More information and examples will be given in class. Don’t wait until the last minute to begin taking notes of conversations!
III. American Identity Essay. Students will write a 5-page essay exploring and complicating the theme of “American Identity.” (20%)
Sample essay requirements:
IV. American Identity Group Project or Performance. Students will collaborate on a project that demonstrates their research on an aspect of the course theme. (20%)
Sample group project: American Identity Group Project: In this project you’ll be using the course wiki to collect and analyze visual and aural imagery that circulates a particular narrative about America or being American.

V. Oral Presentation/Performance. Students will present/perform their research and new understandings of the diverse forms of American identity within local and global contexts. (20%)




Important dates and information:

First day of class:

Midterm withdrawal date without academic penalty:

Last day of class:

Final exam period:
Classroom Attendance Policies:

This policy is not intended to be punitive, but to acknowledge the importance of the learning that takes place during class meetings and our responsibilities to the learning of the entire classroom community. We have multiple collaborative activities that depend upon your participation, preparation and attention. There is no distinguishing between excused and unexcused absences, so please factor in travel plans, holidays and other obligations.


Should you miss four classes, your grade will drop by 25 points. For every additional class you miss, your grade will drop an additional 50 points. As you can see, absences quickly affect your ability to pass the course.
Grade information:


Description of Assignments or Activities

Due date

Percentage of Grade Distribution

1. Classroom participation, quizzes, online discussions




20% 100 points

2. Reading responses




20% 100 points

3. “American Identity” Essay




20% 100 points

4. “American Identity” Group Project/Performance




20% 100 points

5. Oral Presentation/Performance

(Final Exam)






20% 100 points







100% 500 points Total


Evaluation and Grading:

Individual rubrics and/or criteria for evaluation will be provided for each major assignment listed above. For the overall course grade, the following scale will apply:




Grading Scale
A = 90-100% (450 – 500 pts.)

B = 80-89% (400 - 449 pts.)

C = 70-79% (350 - 399 pts.)

D = 60-69% (300 - 349 pts.)

F = 59-0% (299 pts. and below)


Draft Calendar:
Week 1:

Reading assignment: J. Hector St. John de Crevecoeur, Letters from an American Farmer--Introduction (7-22) and Letter III—“What is an American?” (66-105)


Discussion topics to include: positioning Crevecoeur’s writing in historical context, comparing and contrasting his narrative about belonging, displacement.
Try out our course wiki! Once you log in, you’ll be asked to introduce yourself to the class and to explain what attracted you to this particular general education offering.
Week 2:

Reading: Poetry and song lyrics: Sherman Alexie’s “How to Write the Great American Indian Novel”; National anthem and “America the Beautiful.”


Discussion to include: What are grand narratives or national narratives? How do they create a sense of belonging or exclusion? What poetry or music contributes to constructing “American Identity”? What stereotypes does Alexie satirize in his poem, “The Great American Indian Novel”?

Week 3:


Reading/viewing: Have watched H.G. Wells, Citizen Kane.
Have posted your discussion response by class time!

Discussion of Citizen Kane to include: How does the film present the “American Dream”? In what ways might film reflect or contribute to the rags-to-riches narrative about American life? In what ways does the film reflect or contribute to class assumptions in American life? Why do you think this film has a reputation for being a quintessentially American film?


Week 4:

Reading: Edward Albee. The American Dream.

Discussion to include: How does drama contribute to our understanding of American Identity? How does he characterize the “American family”? How does satire function to critique social issues?
Response paper 1 due!
American Identity Group Project directions will be distributed. You’ll be using the course wiki to collect and analyze visual and aural imagery that circulates a particular narrative about America or being American.
Week 5:

Reading: Funny in Farsi

Discussion to include: What does the book expose about American life in this period? How does it present different views of what it means to be an American? How does it complicate the expectations about being an American? How is language (specifically English) used in the book and to what end?
Week 6:

Reading: Funny in Farsi

Discussion to include: What does this narrative expose about point of view? Subjectivity? What does this text tell us about enactments of power in the American experience? In what ways is this an American narrative? How does humor function to reveal or critique “American” identity?
American Identity Group Project due!
Week 7:

Have viewed the photographs and read the supporting material in Sheila Pree Bright’s series Young Americans (on reserve).


To do: Note how you’re “reading” the photographs. Where in the photo do you start? What draws your eye? How long do you look? Do you leaf through them all and then go back to them? Be prepared to discuss your “practices of looking” with the class on Vista!
Discussion to include: What do you think Pree is probing by asking college students to pose with the American plan? What do the photos expose about American life today?
Response paper 2 due!
Week 8:

Reading: Selections from Frederick Jackson Turner’s The Significance of the Frontier in American Experience

Discussion to include: What does Turner expose by his assertion, “In this advance, the frontier is the outer edge of the wave—the meeting point between savagery and civilization.” Where does the “frontier metaphor” appear in popular culture? To what ends? Select a passage you find interesting or provocative to share with the class.
Week 9:

Reading: Sherman Alexie. The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian,

Discussion to include: What does Alexie’s “true diary” reveal about the past and present economic, social, and educational realities of “the rez”? How can Junior be “an immigrant” in his own country?
Week 10:

Reading: Sandra Cisneros. Woman Hollering Creek.

Discussion to include: What does it mean to “cross boundaries”? How does Cleofilas’s life change when she moves from Mexico to Texas? In what ways is an “American dream” affected by gender, ethnicity, country of origin, and more?

Response paper 3 due!


Week 11:

Reading: Stanley Nelson. Freedom Riders

Discussion to include: What new information did you learn from this documentary film? How do documentaries contribute to an understanding of what it means to be “American”?
Week 12:

Reading: W.E.B DuBois. The Souls of Black Folk.

Discussion to include: This author’s work has been influential in thinking about race and identity in America. How would you describe his position about race or ethnic identity and “American identity”? What does DuBois mean by a “double consciousness”?
Week 13:

Reading/viewing: Fannie Flagg, Fried Green Tomatoes (novel excerpts/film clips)

Discussion to include: How does this popular film (adapted from the novel), represent the South? How are regions within the United States typically represented in film?
Week 14:

Response paper 4 due!


Week 15 and final exam period: Presentations and Performances
********************************************
Disability Statement:
Any student who, because of a disabling condition, may require some special arrangements in order to meet the course requirements should contact the instructor as soon as possible to arrange the necessary accommodations. Students should present appropriate verification from KSU disAbled Student Support Services. No requirement exists that accommodations be made prior to completion of this approved University process. DisAbled Student Services can be reached here: http://www.kennesaw.edu/stu_dev/dsss/dsss.html or Ph: 770-423-6443, Fax: 770-423-6667, 770-423-6480TTY

Student Conduct Statements
KSU’s Full Code of Conduct is Located Here:

http://www.kennesaw.edu/scai/code_of_conduct.shtml#ii





Key Excerpts from the Code of Conduct:

II. Academic Honesty

The high quality of education at Kennesaw State University is reflected in the credits and degrees its students earn. The protection of these high standards is crucial since the validity and equity of the University's grades and degrees depend upon it. Any student found to have violated any KSU academic honesty regulation after a hearing before a university hearing panel or before the Vice President for Student Success and Enrollment Services (or his/her designee) shall be suspended for at least one semester, unless the student persuades the deciding body that the circumstances of his or her behavior substantially mitigate the gravity of the violation. These regulations are designed to assist students in (1) developing appropriate attitudes about, and (2) understanding and following the university’s standards relating to academic honesty. The regulations protect students by helping them avoid committing infractions that may compromise the completion of their KSU degrees or damage their reputations.



Plagiarism and Cheating

No student shall receive, attempt to receive, knowingly give or attempt to give unauthorized assistance in the preparation of any work required to be submitted for credit as part of a course (including examinations, laboratory reports, essays, themes, term papers, etc.). When direct quotations are used, they should be indicated, and when the ideas, theories, data, figures, graphs, programs, electronic based information or illustrations of someone other than the student are incorporated into a paper or used in a project, they should be duly acknowledged.



Disruption of Campus Life:

It is the purpose of the institution to provide a campus environment which encourages academic accomplishment, personal growth, and a spirit of understanding and cooperation. An important part of maintaining such an environment is the commitment to protect the health and safety of every member of the campus community. Belligerent, abusive, profane, threatening and/or inappropriate behavior on the part of students is a violation of the Kennesaw State University Student Conduct Regulations. Students who are found responsible for such misconduct may be subject to immediate dismissal from the institution. In addition, university disciplinary proceedings may be instituted against a student charged with a violation of a law which is also a violation of this student code without regard to the pendency of civil litigation in court or criminal arrest and prosecution. Proceedings under this student code of conduct may be carried out prior to, simultaneously with, or following civil or criminal proceedings off-campus.





KSU Policy and Position Statements

(taken from the Faculty Handbook)

Intellectual Diversity Statement:

Kennesaw State University is an educational community comprised of individuals from different ethnic, racial and religious groups and of different genders, political beliefs, ages, abilities and sexual orientations. In light of this diversity, Kennesaw State University is resolved to contribute to the development of an integrated, pluralistic society in which individuals model and support humaneness and respect for the individual. Kennesaw State University is committed to a diversity of intellectual viewpoints. We trust in a genuine free marketplace of ideas where faculty and students are encouraged to express their considered opinions openly. We further believe that this intellectual exchange is healthy, democratic and produces new insights. The exchange of ideas is also a splendid means of encouraging “critical thinking” as long as it is conducted within an atmosphere that respects the dignity of all concerned. The University is committed to providing quality education, which is enhanced by the perspectives provided by individuals and groups with varying backgrounds and views. Racism, sexism and other discriminatory attitudes and behaviors impede learning and working. Conversely, respect for differences enhances educational and work experiences. Kennesaw State University is dedicated to creating an environment that cherishes and nourishes this diversity.


Kennesaw State University Diversity Vision Statement

It is our vision to create a strong multicultural and diverse educational environment at KSU in order to increase student satisfaction and to promote an understanding and awareness of people from various backgrounds upon graduation. In this way, KSU students will be educated for, and can effectively compete in, the global society.


KSU Position Statement on Environmental Awareness:

Kennesaw State University endeavors to encourage in each student, faculty, staff member and the community a respect for the worth of the environment and a desire and capacity to recycle, to conserve energy and to take other measures to help conserve limited resources. This institution focuses on developing an environmental ethic that promotes excellence, responsibility and stewardship in environmental affairs and is committed to educating the community about environmental issues.



Various Student Resources

KSU Writing Center: http://www.kennesaw.edu/english/WritingCenter/

Phone: (770) 423-6380


Sturgis Library: http://www.kennesaw.edu/library/ (Phone: 770-423-6202)
Counseling & Psychological Services Center (formerly CAPS):

http://www.kennesaw.edu/studentsuccess/cslgindex.html

Phone: 770-423-6600
Student Technology Services:

http://its.kennesaw.edu/students/index.html (Help Line: 770-499-3555)


ESL Tutoring and Study Center:

http://www.kennesaw.edu/university_studies/esl/center.shtml


Adult Learner Center (Includes info on childcare subsidies for student-parents):

http://www.kennesaw.edu/stu_dev/alp/index.shtml


International Student Center: http://www.kennesaw.edu/stu_dev/isrs/
Minority Student Retention: http://www.kennesaw.edu/stu_dev/msrs/
Support Site for Student Veterans: http://clubs.kennesaw.edu/ksuvc/
Study Abroad Information:

http://www.kennesaw.edu/studyabroad/index.html


Center for Student Leadership (community service, leadership, and international travel opportunities for outstanding students): http://www.kennesaw.edu/csl/
Volunteer KSU (Community Service Opportunities for classes & individuals):

http://www.kennesaw.edu/stu_dev/vksu/vksu.html







Download 77.86 Kb.

Share with your friends:




The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2022
send message

    Main page