K1 General Knowledge



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United States History – Eighth Grade

General Knowledge, Processes, & Skills Social Studies Pacing Guide

Reached throughout Year
General Social Science Knowledge – embedded in eighth grade standards and expectations and used throughout the course of study.
K1 General Knowledge

K1.1 Understand and analyze important temporal, spatial, political, and economic relationships, patterns, and trends.

K1.2 Understand historical, geographical, political, and economic perspectives.

K1.3 Understand the diversity of human beings and human cultures.

K1.4 Analyze events and circumstances from the vantage point of others.

K1.5 Understand social problems, social structure, institutions, class, groups, and interaction.

K1.6 Apply social studies concepts to better understand major current local, national, and world events, issues, and problems.

K1.7 Integrate concepts from at least two different social studies disciplines.

K1.8 Understand significant concepts, principles, and theories of history, geography, civics, and economics as disciplines.
P1 Reading and Communication – read and communicate effectively.

P1.1 Use close and critical reading strategies to read and analyze texts pertaining to social science; attend to nuance, make connections to prior knowledge, draw inferences, and determine main idea and supporting details.

P1.2 Analyze point of view, context, and bias to interpret primary and secondary source documents.

P1.3 Understand that diversity of interpretation arises from frame of reference.

P1.4 Communicate clearly and coherently in writing, speaking, and visually expressing ideas pertaining to social science topics, acknowledging audience and purpose.

P1.5 Present a coherent thesis when making an argument, support with evidence, and present a concise, clear closing.


P2 Inquiry, Research, and Analysis – critically examine evidence, thoughtfully consider conflicting claims, and carefully weigh facts and hypotheses.

P2.1 Understand the scientific method of inquiry to investigate social scientific and historical problems.

P2.3 Know how to find and organize information from a variety of sources, analyze, interpret, support interpretations with evidence, critically evaluate, and present the information orally and in writing; report investigation results effectively.

P2.4 Use multiple perspectives and resources to identify and analyze issues appropriate to the social studies discipline being studied.

P2.5 Use deductive and inductive problem-solving skills as appropriate to the problem being studied.
P3 Public Discourse and Decision Making – engage in reasoned and informed decision making that should characterize each citizen’s participation in American society.

P3.1 Clearly state an issue as a question of public policy, trace the origins of an issue, analyze various perspectives, and generate and evaluate possible alternative resolutions.

P3.2 Deeply examine policy issues in group discussions and debates (clarify issues, consider opposing views, apply democratic values or constitutional principles, anticipate consequences) to make reasoned and informed decisions.

P3.3 Write persuasive/argumentative essays expressing and justifying decisions on public policy issues.



P4 Citizen Involvement

P4.1 Act out of respect for the rule of law and hold others accountable to the same standard.

P4.2 Demonstrate knowledge of how, when, and where individuals would plan and conduct activities intended to advance views on matters of public policy, report the results, and evaluate effectiveness.

P4.3 Plan and conduct activities intended to advance views on matters of public policy, report the results, and evaluate effectiveness.


United States History – Eighth Grade

Month: September – 4 Weeks Social Studies Pacing Guide

Unit 1 and 2: Review of Beginnings and Colonization


Code & Content Expectations

(Disciplinary Knowledge)



Essential

Questions/Scaffold

Assessment

Vocabulary

Resources


USHG ERA 1 – Beginnings to 1620 (Grade 5)

5 – U1.1 American Indian Life in the Americas
5 – U1.2 European Exploration and Conquest
5 – U1.4 Three World Interactions
F1 Political and Intellectual Transformations
F1.1 Describe the ideas, experiences, and interactions that influenced the colonists’ decisions to declare independence by analyzing

  • colonial ideas about government (e.g., limited government, republicanism, protecting individual rights and promoting the common good, representative government, natural rights) (C2)

  • experiences with self-government (e.g., House of Burgesses and town meetings) (C2)

  • changing interactions with the royal government of Great Britain after the French and Indian War (C2)


USHG ERA 2 – Colonization and Settlement (1585-1763) (Grade 5)
5 – U2.1 European Struggle for Control of North America
5 – U2.2 European Slave Trade in Colonial America
5 – U2.3 Life in Colonial America
F1.2 Using the Declaration of Independence, including the grievances at the end of the document, describe the role this document played in expressing

  • colonists’ views of government

  • their reasons for separating from Great Britain. (C2)


How had the European exploration and conquest of the Native Americans impacted their lives?

How did the struggle for control of North America cause the slave trade and origins of Africans to the Americas?

How did the three world interactions, impacted life in colonial America?



Group reading, discussion and notes.


Graphic Organizers
Vocabulary and Map Activity
Assessment questions based off of essential questions.
Chapter Test

  • pre test

  • post test

Unit Test



Crusades

Islam

Middle Ages



Muslim

Reformation

Renaissance
African Diaspora

Columbian Exchange

conquistador

mercantilism

middle passage

New France plantation

racism

slavery


Spanish Armada

Treaty of Tordesillas


Bacon’s Rebellion

cash crop

charter

diversity

Duke of York

Great Migration

House of Burgesses

indentured servant

Jamestown

joint-stock company

King Philip’s War

Mayflower Compact

Navigation Acts

Overseer


patron

Pilgrims


proprietary colony

Puritans


Quaker

royal colony

triangular trade

Primary Sources


Supplemental Resources



  • Textbook

  • Historical excerpts

  • Biographies

  • Videos (history related)

  • Posters

Overhead/Transparencies


Key People

Christopher Columbus

Hernando Cortes Montezuma

Francisco Pizarro

Henry Hudson

John Cabot

Jacques Cartier

Samuel de Champlain

John Smith

Roger Williams

Anne Hutchinson

Peter Stuyvesant

William Penn

James Oglethorpe

Eliza Lucas

William Byrd II





United States History – Eighth Grade

Month: October/November – 8 Weeks Social Studies Pacing Guide

Unit 3: Revolution and the New Nation (1754 – 1800’s)


Code & Content Expectations

(Disciplinary Knowledge)



Essential

Questions/Scaffold

Assessment

Vocabulary

Resources


F1.3 Describe the consequences of the American Revolution by analyzing the

  • birth of an independent republican government (C2)

  • creation of Articles of Confederation (C2)

  • changing views on freedom and equality (C2)

  • and concerns over distribution of power within governments, between government and the governed, and among people (C2)


U3 USHG ERA 3 – Revolution and the New Nation
U3.3 Creating New Government(s) and a New ConstitutionExplain the challenges faced by the new nation and analyze the development of the Constitution as a new plan for governing. [Foundations for Civics HSCE Standard 2.2.]

Note: Expectations U3.3.1–U3.3.5 address content that was introduced in Grade 5, but ask for explanation and analysis at a higher level than expected in Grade 5. They are included here to support in-depth discussion of the historical and philosophical origins of constitutional government in the United States. (U3.3.6)


8 – U3.3.1 Explain the reasons for the adoption and subsequent failure of the Articles of Confederation (e.g., why its drafters created a weak central government, challenges the nation faced under the Articles, Shays’ Rebellion, disputes over western lands). (C2)
8 – U3.3.2 Identify economic and political questions facing the nation during the period of the Articles of Confederation and the opening of the Constitutional Convention. (E1.4)
8 – U3.3.3 Describe the major issues debated at the Constitutional Convention including the distribution of political power, conduct of foreign affairs, rights of individuals, rights of states, election of the executive, and slavery as a regional and federal issue.
8 – U3.3.4 Explain how the new constitution resolved (or compromised) the major issues including sharing, separating, and checking of power among federal government institutions, dual sovereignty (state-federal power), rights of individuals, the Electoral College, the Three-Fifths Compromise, and the Great Compromise.
8 – U3.3.5 Analyze the debates over the ratification of the Constitution from the perspectives of Federalists and Anti-Federalists and describe how the states ratified the Constitution. (C2) (National Geography Standard 3, p. 148)
8 – U3.3.6 Explain how the Bill of Rights reflected the concept of limited government, protections of basic freedoms, and the fear of many Americans of a strong central government. (C3)
8 – U3.3.7 Using important documents (e.g., Mayflower Compact, Iroquois Confederacy, Common Sense, Declaration of Independence, Northwest Ordinance, Federalist Papers), describe the historical and philosophical origins of constitutional government in the United States using the ideas of social compact, limited government, natural rights, right of revolution, separation of powers, bicameralism, republicanism, and popular participation in government. (C2)

What were the main events that led to the colonists breaking away from Britain?

What obstacles did the colonists overcome in order to establish their new nation?

What were the main issues each state had with ratification of the new constitution?



Group reading, discussion and notes.


Graphic Organizers
Vocabulary and Map Activity
Assessment questions based off of essential questions.
Chapter Test

  • pre test

  • post test

Unit Test



Albany Plan of Union

Apprentice

Battle of Quebec Treaty of Paris

English Bill of Rights

Enlightenment

French and Indian War

Glorious Revolution

Great Awakening

Magna Carta

Parliament

Pontiac’s Rebellion

Proclamation of 1763
Boston Massacre

Boston Tea Party

boycott

committee of correspondence



Militia

Minuteman

Quartering Act

revenue


Sons of Liberty

Stamp Act

Sugar Act

Townsend Acts

writs of assistance

artillery

Continental Army

Declaration of Independence

First Continental Congress

Intolerable Acts

Lexington and Concord

loyalist


patriot

Second Continental Congress


Battle of Yorktown

Battles of Saratoga

bayonet

desert


guerrillas

mercenary

pacifist

privateer

rendezvous

republicanism

strategy

Treaty of Paris of 1783


Articles of Confederation

Constitutional Convention

Great Compromise

Land Ordinance of 1785

New Jersey Plan

Northwest Ordinance

Northwest Territory

Shays’ Rebellion

Three-Fifths Compromise

Virginia Plan


Alien and Sedition Acts

Battle of Fallen Timbers

cabinet

Federal Judiciary Act



foreign policy

French Revolution

inaugurate

Jay’s Treaty

neutral

Pinckney’s Treaty



political party

States’ rights

tariff

Treaty of Greenville



Whiskey Rebellion

XYZ Affair




Primary Sources



  • Maps

  • Historical documents

  • Auto-Biography

  • Globe

Supplemental Resources



  • Textbook

  • Historical excerpts

  • Biographies

  • Videos (history related)

  • Posters

Overhead/Transparencies


Jonathan Edwards

George Whitefield

Benjamin Franklin

John Locke

Edmund Andros

John Peter Zenger


King George III

Patrick Henry

Crispus Attucks

Samuel Adams

John Adams

Paul Revere

Ethan Allen

Benedict Arnold

Thomas Jefferson
George Washington

Marquis de Lafayette

James Foten

John Paul Jones

Lord Cornwallis

Elizabeth Freeman

Richard Allen

James Madison






United States History – Eighth Grade

Month: December-March – 12 Weeks Social Studies Pacing Guide

Unit 4: Expansion and Reform (1792 – 1861)


Code & Content Expectations

(Disciplinary Knowledge)



Essential

Questions/Scaffold

Assessment

Vocabulary

Resources


U4 USHG ERA 4 – Expansion and Reform (1792-1861)
U4.1 Challenges to an Emerging Nation – Analyze the challenges the new government faced and the role of political and social leaders in meeting these challenges.
8 – U4.1.1 Washington’s Farewell – Use Washington’s Farewell Address to analyze the most significant challenges the new nation faced and the extent to which subsequent Presidents heeded Washington’s advice. (C4)
8 – U4.1.2 Establishing America’s Place in the World – Explain the changes in America’s relationships with other nations by analyzing treaties with American Indian nations, Jay’s Treaty (1795), French Revolution, Pinckney’s Treaty (1795), Louisiana Purchase, War of 1812, Transcontinental Treaty (1819), and the Monroe Doctrine. (C4) (National Geography Standard 13, p. 161)
8 – U4.1.3 Challenge of Political Conflict –

Explain how political parties emerged out of the competing ideas, experiences, and fears of Thomas Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton (and their followers), despite the worries the Founders had concerning the dangers of political division, by analyzing disagreements over



  • relative power of the national government (e.g., Whiskey Rebellion, Alien and Sedition Acts) (C3)

  • foreign relations (e.g., French Revolution, relations with Great Britain) (C3)

  • economic policy (e.g., the creation of a national bank, assumption of revolutionary debt) (C3, E2.2)


8 – U4.1.4 Establishing a National Judiciary and Its Power – Explain the development of the power of the Supreme Court through the doctrine of judicial review as manifested in Marbury v. Madison (1803) and the role of Chief Justice John Marshall and the Supreme Court in interpreting the power of the national government (e.g., McCullouch v. Maryland, Dartmouth College v. Woodward, Gibbons v. Ogden). (C3, E1.4, 2.2)
U4.2 Regional and Economic Growth – Describe and analyze the nature and impact of the territorial, demographic, and economic growth in the first three decades of the new nation using maps, charts, and other evidence.
8 – U4.2.1 Comparing Northeast and the South – Compare and contrast the social and economic systems of the Northeast and the South with respect to geography and climate and the development of

  • agriculture, including changes in productivity, technology, supply and demand, and price (E1.3,1.4)

  • industry, including entrepreneurial development of new industries, such as textiles (E1.1)

  • the labor force including labor incentives and changes in labor forces (E1.2)

  • transportation including changes in transportation (steamboats and canal barges) and impact on economic markets and prices (E1.2,1.3)

  • immigration and the growth of nativism

  • race relations

  • class relations


8 – U4.2.2 The Institution of Slavery – Explain the ideology of the institution of slavery, its policies, and consequences.
8 – U4.2.3 Westward ExpansionExplain the expansion, conquest, and settlement of the West through the Louisiana Purchase, the removal of American Indians (Trail of Tears) from their native lands, the growth of a system of commercial agriculture, and the idea of Manifest Destiny. (E2.1) (National Geography Standard 6, p. 154)
8 – U4.2.4 Consequences of Expansion – Develop an argument based on evidence about the positive and negative consequences of territorial and economic expansion on American Indians, the institution of slavery, and the relations between free and slaveholding states. (C2) (National Geography Standard 13, p. 169)
U4.3 Reform Movements – Analyze the growth of antebellum American reform movements.
8 – U4.3.1 Explain the origins of the American education system and Horace Mann’s campaign for free compulsory public education. (C2)
8 – U4.3.2 Describe the formation and development of the abolitionist movement by considering the roles of key abolitionist leaders (e.g., John Brown and the armed resistance, Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad, Sojourner Truth, William Lloyd Garrison, and Frederick Douglass), and the response of southerners and northerners to the abolitionist movement. (C2) (National Geography Standard 6, p. 154)
8 – U4.3.3 Analyze the antebellum women’s rights (and suffrage) movement by discussing the goals of its leaders (e.g., Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton) and comparing the Seneca Falls Resolution with the Declaration of Independence. (C2)
8 – U4.3.4 Analyze the goals and effects of the antebellum temperance movement. (C2)
8 – U4.3.5 Evaluate the role of religion in shaping antebellum reform movements. (C2)

What were the challenges that the new government faced and the role of the political and social leaders in meeting those challenges?


What are the differences between the territorial, demographic, and economic growth of the new nation?

  • north, south and west

  • people

  • industry

How were the various national movements that redirected social reform that impacted the new nation analyzed?


Group reading, discussion and notes.


Graphic Organizers
Vocabulary and Map Activity
Assessment questions based off of essential questions.
Chapter Test

  • pre test

  • post test

Unit Test



Battle of the Thames

Embargo Act of 1807

impressments

judicial review

Judiciary Act of 1801

Lewis and Clark expedition

Louisiana Purchase

Marbury v. Madison

radical


Sacagawea

Treaty of Ghent

unconstitutional

War Hawk
American System

cotton gin

Erie Canal

factory system

Industrial Revolution

interchangeable parts

John Quincy Adams

Lowell mills

Missouri Compromise

Monroe Doctrine

Nationalism

sectionalism

spirituals

depression

Doctrine of Nullification

Indian Removal Act

Indian Territory

inflation

Jacksonian Democracy

Panic of 1837

secession

spoils system

Tariff of Abominations

Trail of Tears

Webster-Hayne debate

Whig Party
Battle of the Alamo

Bear Flag Revolt

California gold rush

Californio

forty-niner

land speculator

Lone Star Republic

Manifest Destiny

Mariano

Mexican Cession



Mormon

mountain man

Oregon Train

Santa Fe Trail

Tejano

Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo



Vallejo
abolition

civil disobedience

emigrant

famine


immigrant

labor union

nativist

prejudice

push-pull factor

revival


romanticism

Second Great Awakening

Seneca Falls Convention

steerage


strike

suffrage

temperance movement

transcendentalism

Underground Railroad

Primary Sources



  • Maps

  • Historical documents

  • Auto-Biography

  • Globe

Supplemental Resources



  • Textbook

  • Historical excerpts

  • Biographies

  • Videos (history related)

  • Posters

Overhead/Transparencies


Key People

John Marshall

William Clark

Meriwether Lewis

Zebulon Pike

Tecumseh


Oliver Hazard Perry

Francis Scott Key

Samuel Slater

Robert Fulton

Samuel F. B. Morse

Eli Whitney

Nat Turner

Henry Clay

James Monroe

Andrew Jackson

Sequoyah

Osceola


John C. Calhoun

Daniel Webster

Martin Van Buren

William Henry Harrison

John Tyler
Jedediah Smith

Jim Beckwourth

Brigham Young

Stephen Austin

Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna

Sam Huston

William Travis

Juan Seguin

James K. Polk

Zachary Taylor

Winfield Scott

John Sutter

James Marshall

Horace Mann

Dorothea Dix

Frederick Douglas

Sojourner Truth

Harriet Tubman

Elizabeth Cady Stanton



United States History – Eighth Grade

Month: March-May – 8 Weeks Social Studies Pacing Guide

Unit 5: Civil War and Reconstruction (1850 – 1877)


Code & Content Expectations

(Disciplinary Knowledge)



Essential

Questions/Scaffold

Assessment

Vocabulary

Resources


U5 USHG ERA 5 – Civil War and Reconstruction (1850-1877)
U5.1 The Coming of the Civil War

Analyze and evaluate the early attempts to abolish or contain slavery and to realize the ideals of the Declaration of Independence.


8 – U5.1.1 Explain the differences in the lives of free blacks (including those who escaped from slavery) with the lives of free whites and enslaved peoples. (C2)
8 – U5.1.2 Describe the role of the Northwest Ordinance and its effect on the banning of slavery (e.g., the establishment of Michigan as a free state). (National Geography Standard 12, p. 167)
8 – U5.1.3 Describe the competing views of Calhoun, Webster, and Clay on the nature of the union among the states (e.g., sectionalism, nationalism, federalism, state rights). (C3)
8 – U5.1.4 Describe how the following increased sectional tensions

  • the Missouri Compromise (1820)• the Wilmot Proviso (1846)

  • the Compromise of 1850 including the Fugitive Slave Act

  • the Kansas-Nebraska Act (1854) and subsequent conflict in Kansas

  • the Dred Scott v. Sandford decision (1857)

  • changes in the party system (e.g., the death of the Whig party, rise of the Republican party and division of the Democratic party) (C2; C3) (National Geography Standard 13, p. 169)


8 – U5.1.5 Describe the resistance of enslaved people (e.g., Nat Turner, Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad, John Brown, Michigan’s role in the Underground Railroad) and effects of their actions before and during the Civil War. (C2)
8 – U5.1.6 Describe how major issues debated at the Constitutional Convention such as disagreements over the distribution of political power, rights of individuals (liberty and property), rights of states, election of the executive, and slavery help explain the Civil War (C2).
U5.2 Civil War – Evaluate the multiple causes, key events, and complex consequences of the Civil War.
8 – U5.2.1 Explain the reasons (political, economic, and social) why Southern states seceded and explain the differences in the timing of secession in the Upper and Lower South. (C3, E1.2) (National Geography Standard 6, p. 154)
8 – U5.2.2 Make an argument to explain the reasons why the North won the Civil War by considering the

  • critical events and battles in the war

  • the political and military leadership of the North and South

  • the respective advantages and disadvantages, including geographic, demographic, economic and technological (E1.4) (National Geography Standard 15, p. 173)


8 – U5.2.3 Examine Abraham Lincoln’s presidency with respect to

  • his military and political leadership

  • the evolution of his emancipation policy (including the Emancipation Proclamation)

  • and the role of his significant writings and speeches, including the Gettysburg Address and its relationship to the Declaration of Independence (C2)


8 – U5.2.4 Describe the role of African Americans in the war, including black soldiers and regiments, and the increased resistance of enslaved peoples.
8 – U5.2.5 Construct generalizations about how the war affected combatants, civilians (including the role of women), the physical environment, and the future of warfare, including technological developments. (National Geography Standard 14, p. 171)
U5.3 Reconstruction – Using evidence, develop an argument regarding the character and consequences of Reconstruction.

8 – U5.3.1 Describe the different positions concerning the reconstruction of Southern society and the nation, including the positions of President Abraham Lincoln, President Andrew Johnson, Republicans, and African Americans.
8 – U5.3.2 Describe the early responses to the end of the Civil War by describing the

  • policies of the Freedmen’s Bureau (E2.2)

  • restrictions placed on the rights and opportunities of freedmen, including racial segregation and Black Codes (C2, C5)


8 – U5.3.3 Describe the new role of African Americans in local, state and federal government in the years after the Civil War and the resistance of Southern whites to this change, including the Ku Klux Klan. (C2, C5)
8 – U5.3.4 Analyze the intent and the effect of the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth Amendments to the Constitution.
8 – U5.3.5 Explain the decision to remove Union troops in 1877 and describe its impact on Americans.

What were the early attempts to abolish slavery?


What are the ideals recognized within the Declaration of Independence?
What are the key events and consequences of the Civil War?
What are the immediate changes and consequences of the Reconstruction Era?


Group reading, discussion and notes.


Graphic Organizers
Vocabulary and Map Activity
Assessment questions based off of essential questions.
Chapter Test

  • pre test

  • post test

Unit Test



Compromise of 1850

Confederate States of America

Crittenden Plan

Dred Scott v. Sandford

Free-Soil Party

Fugitive Slave Act

Harpers Ferry

Kansas Nebraska Act

platform


popular sovereignty

Republican Party

secede

Uncle Tom’s Cabin



Wilmot Proviso
Anaconda Plan

Battle of Antietam

Battle of Shiloh

blockade


border state

Cavalry


Cotton Kingdom

first Battle of Bull Run

Fort Sumter

hygiene


ironclad

rifle


Seven Days’ Battles
54th Massachusetts regiment

Appomattox Court House

Battle of Gettysburg

bounty


conscription

Copperhead

Emancipation Proclamation

greenback

income tax

Pickett’s Charge

Siege of Vicksburg

Thirteenth Amendment


black codes

civil rights

Compromise of 1877

Fifteenth Amendment

Fourteenth Amendment

Freedmen’s Bureau

freedmen’s school

Ku Klux Klan

lynch

Panic of 1873



Radical Republicans

reconstruction

sharecropping

Primary Sources



  • Maps

  • Historical documents

  • Auto-Biography

  • Globe

Supplemental Resources



  • Textbook

  • Historical excerpts

  • Biographies

  • Videos (history related)

  • Posters

Overhead/Transparencies


Key People

Henry Clay

Daniel Webster

Stephen A. Douglas

Harriet Beecher Stowe

John Brown

John C. Freemont

James Buchanan

Roger B. Taney

Abraham Lincoln

Jefferson Davis

Robert E. Lee

Ulysses S. Grant

Clara Barton

William Tecumseh

Sherman


John Wilkes Booth

Andrew Johnson





United States History – Eighth Grade

Month: May/June – 3 Weeks Social Studies Pacing Guide

Unit 6: The Development of an Industrial, Urban,

and Global United States (1870 – 1898)


Code & Content Expectations

(Disciplinary Knowledge)



Essential

Questions/Scaffold

Assessment

Vocabulary

Resources


U6 USHG ERA 6 – The Development of an Industrial, Urban, and Global United States (1870-1930) Grade 8 begins to address trends and patterns in the last half of the 19th century, through 1898.
U6.1 America in the Last Half of the 19th Century – Analyze the major changes in communication, transportation, demography, and urban centers, including the location and growth of cities linked by industry and trade, in last half of the 19th century. The purpose of this section is to introduce some of the major changes in American society and the economy in the last part of the 19th Century. This era will be addressed in-depth and with greater intellectual sophistication in the high school United History and Geography content expectations.
8 – U6.1.1 America at Century’s End –Compare and contrast the United States in 1800 with the United States in 1898 focusing on similarities and differences in

  • territory, including the size of the United States and land use

  • population, including immigration, reactions to immigrants, and the changing demographic structure of rural and urban America (E3.2)

  • systems of transportation (canals and railroads, including the Transcontinental Railroad), and their impact on the economy and society (E1.4, 3.2)

  • governmental policies promoting economic development (e.g., tariffs, banking, land grants and mineral rights, the Homestead Act) (E.2.2)

  • economic change, including industrialization, increased global competition, and their impact on conditions of farmers and industrial workers (E1.4, 2.1, 3.2)

  • the treatment of African Americans, including the rise of segregation in the South as endorsed by the Supreme Court’s decision in Plessy v. Ferguson, and the response of African Americans• the policies toward American Indians, including removal, reservations, the Dawes Act of 1887, and the response of American Indians.


U6.2 Investigation Topics and Issue Analysis (P2) – Use the historical perspective to investigate a significant historical topic from United States History Eras 3-6 that also has significance as an issue or topic in the United States today.

8 – U6.2.1 United States History Investigation Topic and Issue Analysis, Past and Present – Use historical perspectives to analyze issues in the United States from the past and the present; conduct research on a historical issue or topic, identify a connection to a contemporary issue, and present findings (e.g., oral, visual, video, or electronic presentation, persuasive essay, or research paper); include causes and consequences of the historical action and predict possible consequences of the contemporary action.
Examples of Investigation Topics and Questions (and examples from United States History)
Balance of Power

How has the nation addressed tensions between state and federal governmental power? (e.g., Articles of Confederation, U.S. Constitution, states’ rights issues, secession, others)


Liberty vs. Security

How has the nation balanced liberty interests with security interests? (e.g., Alien and Sedition Acts, suspension of habeas corpus during the Civil War)



The Government and Social Change

How have governmental policies, the actions of reformers, and economic and demographic changes affected social change? (e.g., abolitionist movement, women’s movement, Reconstruction policies)



Movement of People

How has the nation addressed the movement of people into and within the United States? (e.g., American Indians, immigrants)



What caused the emergence of urban areas; including the changes in politics, transportation and communication?


What are significant historical topics relevant to political, social and economic issues in the United States today?


Group reading, discussion and notes.


Graphic Organizers
Vocabulary and Map Activity
Assessment questions based off of essential questions.
Chapter Test

  • pre test

  • post test

Unit Test



17th Amendment

18th Amendment

19th Amendment

Bessemer process

Homestead strike

Populist Party

progressives

Pullman strike

Second Industrial Revolution

Sherman Antitrust Act
American Federation of Labor

corporations

electric power

Industrialization

Knights of Labor

monopoly


telephone

trade unions

trust

urbanization


Immigration

passport


pogroms

quota


refugees

tenement buildings

visas
Regulation

Social Darwinism


Child Labor Laws

The Jungle

suffrage
expansionists

imperialism

isolationism

militarism

nationalism

Panama Canal

reparations

Spanish-American War

Treaty of Versailles

yellow journalism


consumer goods

credit


Great Depression

Harlem Renaissance

Jazz Age

New Deal


pension

prohibition

Red Scare

Roaring Twenties

Social Security Act

Primary Sources



  • Maps

  • Historical documents

  • Auto-Biography

  • Globe

Supplemental Resources



  • Textbook

  • Historical excerpts

  • Biographies

  • Videos (history related)

  • Posters

Overhead/Transparencies


Key People

Andrew Carnegie

Alexander Graham Bell

Thomas Edison

John D. Rockefeller

Theodore Roosevelt

Woodrow Wilson

W.E.B. DuBois

Upton Sinclair

Herbert Hoover



Franklin D. Roosevelt





Eighth Grade Social Studies Pacing Guide – Revised March 2008



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