Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, jgahs vol. VII. No. I., Notes on the Persons Named in the Obituary Book of the Franciscan Abbey at Galway by Martin J. Blake, 1-28



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Donatus Monoeus, Hibernicus, Midensis, Provinciae Hiberniae Minister, vir doctus et insignis concionator, scripsit Brevem Historiam ejusdem Prouinciae, quam habeo penes me MS.
* Hardiman's History of Galway at p. 79.

t Ware's Writers of Ireland (Harris' Edition) at p. 103.
GALWAY FRANCISCAN OBITUARY.
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"Donatus Mooney, an Irishman, of Meath diocese, Administrator of the Irish Province, a learned man, and a distinguished public speaker, wrote a SHORT HISTORY OF THAT PROVINCE, which I have before me in Manuscript."
The above description by Wadding, of Donatus Mooney as "Donatus Monoeus" is clearly identical with the description "Donatus Moyneus" in this obit, the entry of which, as Sir James Ware noted, was written in a recent hand.
(8) LORD MYLER, SON OF THEOBALD DE BURGO, 1520.

[See Vol. VI., No. iv. at p. 231].

This Myler de Burgh (or Bourke) was the eldest son of Theobald de Burgh (or Bourke) as to whom, see ante, Note (5).

Myler Bourke was elected Mac William Eighter, i.e. Chief of the Lower (or Mayo) Bourkes, in 1514. His death in 1520, is thus recorded in the Annals of Loch Ce:
"A.D. 1520: :MacWilliam Burke, i.e. Meiler, the son of Theobald, was treacherously killed by the sons of Seoinin Mor."
The sons of Seoinin Mor thus referred to were Richard and Meiler Bourke. Their father Seoinin Mor Bourke, was son of Raymond, son of Meiler, son of William, son of John Boy (who died in 1403), son of John Midheach (who died in 1342) son of Seoinin (Burke), second son of William de Burgh (or Burke) styled of Athanchip (who was slain in 1270). This family of Bourke were called the "Clan Seoinin" from that Seoinin Burke, who was second son of William de Burgh styled Athanchip. Sir William Liath de Burgh was the eldest son of that William de Burgh styled Athanchip. The Clan Seoinin Bourkes from 1400 to 1655 were located in the barony of Kilrnaine, County Mayo. In the 18th century many of them anglicised their clan surname "MacSeoinin or MacJonyn," into"Jennings."

From the Myler de Burgh (or Bourke) whose death in 1520 is recorded in this obit, Theobald Burke of Moneycrower in Kil­maine barony, Co. Mayo (living in 1617) was probably descended-though the actual links of the descent are not authenticated. The Earls of Mayo (which peerage still exists) are certainly descended from the above-mentioned Theobald Bourke of Money­crower. The statements in Lodge's Peerage (Archdall's edition) as to the immediate ancestry of Theobald Bourke of Moneycrower (living 1617) are, howeyer, inaccurate.
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GALWAY ARCHAEOLOGICAL AND HISTOHlCAL SOCIETY.
(9) THOMAS O'MULALLY, ARCHBlSHOP OF TUAM, 1536.

[See Vol. VI., No. iv. at p. 231].
The death of this Thomas O'Mulally is not recorded in any of the Irish Annals. He was appointed Bishop of Clonmacnois,* by Pope Julian II. in 1508, in succession to Dr. Walter Blake: and was elevated by Pope Leo X. to the Archbishopric of Tuam, in succession to Dr. Maurice O'Fithelly, who died in 1513 (for whom see post, Note (12) ).

It appears from the Funeral Entry dated 1638 of Isaac O'Mulally (t) of Tullaghdaly (Tullinadaly) who died the 16th Jnly 1631, that said "Isaac was the eldest son and heir of Dr. William 0'Mulally (or Lally) Archbishop of Tuam, who was the eldest son and heir of Dr. Thomas O'Mulally, Archbishop of Tuam." Dr. William Lally (therein mentioned) was the first Protestant Archbishop of Tuam, and was appointed by Queen Elizabeth in succession to Archbishop Christopher Bodkin who died in 1572.

The O'Mulally's were anciently Chiefs (together with the O'Naghtens) of the district styled Moennoy-the plain lying round Loughrea-but they were dispossessed of that district by the Clan Hubert Burkes (see Vol. VI., No. iv., Note (1) at p. 233); and early in the 17th century some of them were located at Tullinadaly in the baony of Dunmore, Co. Galway.(tt)
(10) WILLLIAM BLAKE, 1458.

[See Vol. VI., No. iv. a.t p. 231].
This William Blake was eldest son of Geoffrey Blake, 3rd son of Walter Blake, son of Richard Cadel, surnamed Niger or Blake. In 1435 this William Blake joined with his kinsmen in making a grant to the Church of St. Nicholas at Galway.** He was ancestor; (through his eldest son John Blake) of the Blakes of Kiltolla, the Blakes of Ballinafad, the Blakes of Ardfry, etc. His will, which as this entry records was, at the request of his son Thomas Blake, proved before Donatus (O'Murray) Archbishop of Tuam on the 17th Febrbary 1475, is not now extant.
* See Theiner Monumenta Hibernorion Historiam illustrantia at p. 515.

t See the Funeral Entries contained in a manuscript in the British Museum (Additional MS., No. 4820, at folio (114).

tt An Account of the Sept O'Mulally is given in the Galway A.rch. Journal,Vol. IV., No. iv. (1905-6) at pp. 198-210.

** Blake Family Records, 1st Series at p. 24: Ibid. 2nd Series, p. 168.
GALWAY FRANCISCAN OBITl'ARY.

17
(11) DONATUS, AHCHBISHOP OF TUAM, 1485.

[See Vol. V1., No. iv. at p. 231].
This was Donatus O'Murray, who was appointed Archbishop of Tuam by Pope Nicholas V. in 1451, in succession to Archbishop John de Burgh (Burke) who died in 1450. It was Archbishop Donatus O'Murray, who by Rescript dated 28th September 1484* constituted tbe ecclesiastical jurisdiction known as the Galway "Collegiate" which was confirmed by a Bull of Pope Innocent VIII. dated the 8th February 1485.*

Archbishop O'Murray died on the 17th January 1485, as appears from a fragmentary Extract made by Sir James Ware from the Obituary Book of the College of St. Nicholas at Galway:(t)
"15 Kalendas Februarii: Obitus Domini Donati Y'Mury, Tuamensis Archiepiscopi, prioris institutoris hujus Collegii ecclesiae, Sancti Nicholai, ordinaria authoritate."
"17 Ja.nuary: Death of Lord Donatus O'Murray, Archbishop of Tuam, the first institutor of the College of the Church of St. Nicholas, by authority, as 'Ordinary.' "
This entry does not give the year in which he died; but it was 1485. None of the Irish Annals record his death.
(12) MAURICE O'FITHEALLY, ARCHBISHOP OF TUAM, 1513.

[See Vol. VI., No. iv. at page 231].
This great prelate, so celebrated for his learning that he was styled by his contemporaries "Flos Mundi" (Flower of the World), is stated by Sir James Ware (tt) to have been a native of Baltimore, a port in County Cork, from whence he was also called Maurice De Portu. But the accuracy of this is doubtful; ** and I am of opinion that Maurice O'Fihelly was a native of the diocese of Clonfert, in County Galway; and that he was given the designation of De Portu from the Monastery of Clonfert Brendan, near the bank of tbe river Shannon, originally founded at Clonfert by St. Brendan, and afterwards taken over by the Canons Regular of St. Augus­
* See Galway Arch. Journal, Vol. VI., No. i. (109-10) at pp. 28, 29.

t The Manuscript of Sir James Ware in which this fragmentary Extract of the Obituary Book of the College of St. Nicholas at Galway is entered, is now preserved in the Bodleian Libra.ry at Oxford, and there catalogued "Rawlinson B. 479. "; the Extract will be found at folio 119b of that Manu­script. The Obituary Book itself of the Collegiate of St, Nicholas at Galway, was unfortunately destroyed or lost between 1652 and 1660.

tt Ware's Works (Harris' Edition, 1764) Vol I., p. 614.

** See Galway Arch. Journal, Vol. IV., No. iv. (1905-6) at pp. 231, 232.
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GALWAY ARCHAEOLOGICAL AND HISTORICAL SOCIETY.
tine, which monastery was called "Monasterium de Porta Puro."*

Maurice O'Fihelly was educated at Oxford University, and afterwards became a Franciscan Friar: he went to Italy and became Governor of the Franciscan Schools at Milan in 1488, and was Doctor of Theology at Padua University from 1491 to 1505. He was appointed Archbishop of Tuam by Pope Julllius II. in 1506, but he continued to reside in Italy, and was present at the Lateran Council in 1512. The next year he departed for Ireland to take up his duties there as Archbishop of Tuam. and landed in the town of Ga1way, but there he died on the 25th May 1513, shortly after his arrival.

His death is thus recorded in the Annals of Ulster:
"A. D. 151:3: Master Maurice O'Fithcellaigh, Doctor of Divinity, and Friar Minor, the unique cleric of the most fame and consideration that was in the East or West during his time, after being two score years in Italy lecturing and composing glosses on the Scriptures, came to land at Galway, being Archbishop of Tuam: and had a plenary indulgence for every one who should be at his Mass the first day he should arrive at Tuam. And after ordering a certain day for that, and the men of Ireland in great part proceeding to meet him, he died in Galway, to the grief of the men of Ireland after him."
He edited many of the works of John Duns Scotus and wrote numerous treatises upon them. He was also the author of a short treatise entitled "Enchyridion Fidei," published at Venice in 1505, which he dedicated to Gerald Fitzgerald, eighth Earl of Kildare. He also wrote (according to both Ware and Wadding) a "Dictionary to the Holy Scriptures," which, however, extends only down to the letter E. This was first published in Venice in 1603. (t) He was buried in an humble cenotaph in the south side of the choir of the Franciscan Abbey Church at Galway; and his successors in the See of Tuam, Archbishops Thomas O'Mulally and Christopher Bodkin, were buried in the same tomb. This tomb like all the others was destroyed when the Abbey Church was demolished during the Cromwellian occupation of Galway (1652-1660).
* See Galway A.rch. Joumal, Vol. IV., No. iv. (1905-6) at pp. 231, 232.

t Ware's Works (Harris' Edition) Vol. II., Writers of Ireland, p. 91. But Friar John Sbarale, who wrote a Supplement to Wadding's Writers of the Minorite Order, which Supplement was publbhed at Rome in 1806, considers that this "Dictionary" was the work of another, much earlier, Mauricius Hibernicus, who flourished towards the end of the 13th century (see p. 535 of Sbarale's Supplement).
GALWAY FRANCISCAN OBITUARY.

19
(13) RICHARD, SON OF WALTER, DE BURGO, 1509.

[See Vol. VI., No. iv. at p. 231].
This Richard de Burgo (or Bourke) was the 3rd son of Walter de Burgh, who was Mac William Eighter (Chief of the Lower or Mayo Bourkes) from 1401 to 1440. Richard. was therefore a younger brother of Theobald de Burgo, for whom see ante Note (5). The death of this Richard de Burgo is not noticed in any of the Irish Annals.

(14) LORD RICHARD, JUNIOR, SON OF WILLIAM DE BURGO, 1519.

[See Vol. VI., No. iv. at p. 232].
This Richard oge Burke was Mac William Oughter (Chief of the Upper or Clanricard Burkes of Galway). He was elected Mac William Oughter on the death of his elder brother Ulick Burke (Ulick Finn) "Mac William Oughter" who died in 1509. Both were sons of Ulick Burke "Mac 'William Oughter" styled Ulick ruadh, who died in 1485, son of Ulick Burke "Mac William Oughter" styled Ulick an Fiona (Ulick of the Wine) who died in 1424, son of Richard oge Burke "MacWilliam Oughter," who died in 1387, son of Ulick Burke of Annaghkeen, who died in 1353, third son of Sir William Liath de Burgh, as to whom see ante, Note (3). The death of this Richard Burke is thus recorded in the Annals of Loch Ce:
"A.D. 1519: MacWiliiam of Clanricard, i.e. Richard oge, son of Ulick Burke, a very wealthy opulent man, died."
(15) WALTER DE BURGO, SON OF JOHN, 1503.

[See Vol. VI., No. iv. at p. 232].
This Walter de Burgo (or Bourke) was son of John Bourke, who was second son of Thomas oge Bourke "Mac William Eighter" (Chief of the Lower or Mayo Bourkes), usually styled Thomas of Moyne, the founder of the Franciscan Abbey of Moyne in Tiraw­ley, who died in 1460. That Thomas Bourke of Moyne was the 3rd (surviving) son of Sir Thomas de Burgh "Mac William Eighter," who died in 1401, who was eldest (surviving) son of Sir Edmund Albanagh de Burgh, who died in 1375, who was second son of Sir William Liath de Burgh (see Note 3).

This Walter de Burgo (or Bourke) was slain at the battle of Be-atha-na-garbhan in 1503, which event is thus recorded in the Annals of the Four Masters:
"A.D. 1503: The defeat of Belathanagarbhan was given by MacWiIliam of Clanricard to O'Kelly, and the people of Conmaicne-Cuil (Kilmaine barony): Walter, son of John, son of Thomas Bourke, a distinguished captain, was slain there."
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GALWAY ARCHAEOLOGICAL AND HISTORICAL SOCIETY.
(16) LORD EDMUND DE BURGO, 1527.

[See Vol. VI., No. iv., at p. 232].
This Edmund de Burgo (or Bourke) was "Mac William Eighter" (Chief of the Lower or Mayo Bourke) from 1520 to his death in 1527. He was eldest son of Ulick Bourke who was second (surviving) son of Edmund Bourke styled Na Fesoige (of the Beard), who died in 1458, who was second (surviving) son of Sir Thomas de Burgh (who died in 1401), who was eldest surviving son of Sir Edmund Albanagh de Burgh, who died in 1375, who was second son of Sir William Liath de Burgh (see Note 3).

The death of this Edmund de Burgh is only recorded in the Annals of UIster.
"A. D. 1527: MacWilliam Burke, vizt. Edmund died this year, and John (Bourke) 'of the Termon' was made King after him."
The John Bourke styled "of the Termon" who became "Mac William Eighter" (Chief of the Lower or Mayo Bourkes) in 1527, was son of Meyler Bourke "MacWilliam Eighter," who was slain in 1520 (for whom see ante, Note (8).

Sir Theobald Bourke, styled Tibbot na Long, (Theobald of the ship), who was created Viscount Mayo in 1627, was great grandson of the Edmund Bourke (Mac William Eighter) whose obit in 1527 is here recorded; for Tibbot na Long was son of Sir Richard Bourke (Mac William Eighter), styled Richard an Iarain, son of David Bourke (Mac William Eighter), son of the aforesaid Edmund Bourke (Mac William Eighter) who died in 1527. The peerage of the Viscounts Mayo is now dormant, if not extinct.
(17) ULICK BURKE, 1534.

[See Vol. VI., No. iv. at p. 232].
This Ulick Burke (or Bourke) was "Mac William Eighter''' (Chief of the Lower or Mayo Bourkes) after John "of the Termon," until his own death in 1534. He was eldest son of Edmund Burke "Mac William Eighter" who was slain in 1513 for whom see ante, Note (4). The death of this Ulick Bourke is not recorded in any of the Irish Annals.
(18) RICHARD (BOURKE) STYLED O'CUAIRSCI, (1479).

[See Vol. VI., No. iv. at p. 232].
This Richard Bourke was eldest son of Edmund Bourke, Na Fesoige (of the Beard), "Mac William Eighter" (Chief of

the Lower or Mayo Bourkes) who died in 1458, who was second (surviving) son of Sir Thomas de Burgh (who died 1401), who
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Illustration of Richard O'Cuairsci Bourke at

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~nolenancestry/page1.html
RICHARD, SON OF EDMOND OF THE BEARD.

(i.e. Richard O'Cuairsci Bourke.)
[From a coloured drawing in the Historia et Genealogia Familia de Burgo manuscript.]
GALWAY ARCHAEOLOGICAL AND HISTORICAL SOCIETY.
22
was eldest surviving son of Sir Edmund Albanagh de Burgh (who died in 1375), who was second son of Sir William Liatth de Burgh. This Richard Bourke was styled "O'Cuairsci" (Cuar Sgiath) i.e. of the bent or round shield. He was elected Mac William Eighter (Chief of the Lower or Mayo Bourkes) in 1469 on the retirement from the chieftaincy of his uncle Richard Bourke of Turlough.

Mr. Hubert Knox in his paper on Grace O'Malley in this Journal,* has shown the untrustworthiness of the tradition which ascribed to Granuaile the incident of the carrying off Lord Howth's young son from Howth into Connaught because she had been refused hospitality at Howth Castle and her afterwards releasing him on condition that Lord Howth should keep the door of the Castle open at dinner time in future.

The incident occurred, but it was Richard O'Cuairsci--not Granuaile-who was concerned in it. Mr. Knox discovered the following note written by Duald MacFirbis in his "Great Book of Genealogies" (preserved in manuscript in the Royal Irish Academy) regarding this Richard O'Cuairsci.
"This is the very same Richard who took the Lord of 'Beann Edair' (the Irish name for Howth) and brought him with him to Tirawley; and there was nougbt else required of him for his ransom, but to keep the door of his Court open at dinner time."
In 1469 Richard O'Cuairsci accompanied Hugh roe O'Donnell Chief of Tyrconnel in an invasion of the territory of MacWilliam Oughter (the Upper MacWilliam or MacWilliam of Clanricard) vizt. Ulick ruadh Burke; a cavalry skirmish between the two forces took place at Ballinduff, and a pitched battle was fought soon after at the river Glanog, a small stream near Cloghanower, in the barony of Clare County Galway: Mac William Oughter (Ulick ruadh Burke), was defeated there; and Mac William Eighter (Richard O'Cuairsci) returned triumphant to Mayo laden with the spoils of Clanricard. In 1470 however, Richard O'Cuairsci was opposed to Hugh roe O'Donnell in a dispute betweeu the O'Conors of Sligo.

The death of Richard O'Cuairsci is not recorded in the Annals of the Four Masters or in the Annals of Loch Ce: but the Annals of Ulster have the following entry of it:

"A.D. 1479: Richard, son of Edmund Burke, namely MacWilliam Eighter, was killed by a fall, this year."



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