Jamie Watson Table of Contents



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Jamie Watson

Table of Contents

Rationale Page 3

Concept Map Page 4

Cluster Mapping Page 5

Opening Activities Page 6

Assessment Plan Page 7

Assessment Checklist Page 8

Lesson 1: Unit Introduction Page 9-10

Lesson 2: Greek Mythology Page 11-12

Lesson 3: Everyday Greek Life Page 13-14

Lesson 4: Athens & Sparta Page 15-16

Lesson 5: Democracy Page 17-18

Lesson 6: Government of Ancient Greece Page 19-20

Lesson 7: Roman Empire Page 21-22

Lesson 8: The Legacy of Ancient Greece & Rome Page 23-24

Closing Activities Page 25



Rationale

This unit has been designed for a grade seven/eight multilevel classroom. It follows the Manitoba Social Studies curriculum, as well as having pieces from the Manitoba English curriculum and the Manitoba Math curriculum. As a teacher it is our job to follow the curriculum.

My personal rationale for picking this topic to do a unit on is that I have always loved mythology. I took several courses in Greek and Roman mythology, as well as Greek and Roman societies in my undergraduate degree at the University of Manitoba. I think that this topic is interesting. I also think that the media and movies take so much inspiration from these ancient societies that it is important to understand them.

This unit will go over the rise and fall of Ancient Greece and Rome. It will talk about the rise of democracy and how it is still present in Canadian society. It will also teach about mythology and mapping.



Concept Map


Ancient Greece & Rome

Storytelling

Religion

Gods

Continuing Legacy

Military

Mythology

Democracy

Government


Cross-Curricular Connections


Manitoba Social Studies Curriculum

KC-001


KC-002

KC-003


KE-055

KE-056


KG-039

KH-031


KH-032

KI-015


KI-016

KI-017


KL-025

KP-046


KP-047

KP-048


VC-001

VH-011


VI-005

VI-006


VP-016



Manitoba English Language Arts Curriculum

1.1.1


1.2.2

2.1.1


2.2.2

3.1.3


5.1.3

5.2.1


5.2.2



Manitoba Math Curriculum

8.SP.2.


8.PR.1.


Opening Activities

For the opening of this unit I will show the class a video made up of clips from movies which are inspired by Ancient Greece and Rome. Some movies I will take clips from will be Troy and Percy Jackson.

Students will write down which movies they recognize. As a whole class we will compile a master list of the movies featured. We will then talk about which events from Ancient Greece or Rome inspired the movie. If we do not know we will put a question mark and come back to it at the end of the unit.

After that I will introduce the unit. I will explain the topics that we will be exploring like government, religion, military, and legacy.



Assessment Plan

Formative: Each lesson has a portion that will be formatively assessed to see if the students are grasping the material. Examples are group work or compare/contrast charts.

Summative: Each lesson will also include a performance based assessment task that will be summatively assessed. Some examples are skits or speeches.

Self Assessment: After some lessons students will do an exit slip to self assess their understanding. They will also do one at the end of the unit.

Some prompts:



  • The most important thing I learned today was...

  • I need help with...

  • I would like to learn more about...

  • Rate your understanding on a scale of 1-10.

  • The best part of today's class was...

  • Summarize today's lesson in 20 words.

Performance Based: The biggest performance based assessment will be the final project, which is a Ancient Greek/Roman fair. Students will be assessed based on a rubric we create together.

Reporting Student Learning: I will have a classroom website set up and I will also use email to communicate with parents if I need direct communication.

Assessment Plan

Student Name

KG-039

KI-017

VI-006

KC-001

KI-015

KI-016

KH-031

VH-011

KC-002

KC-003

VC-001

VP-

016


KL-025

KH-031

KP-047

KP-048

KE-055

KH-032

KP-046

KE-056

VI-005



















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































M: Met N: Not Yet

Lesson 1: Intro to Unit

Subject: Social Studies

Grade: 7-8

Unit: Ancient Societies of Greek & Rome

Topic: Introduction to Unit

Essential Skills/ Understanding(s)

Learning Outcomes

KH-031: Identify people, events, and ideas in ancient Greece and Rome.


Assessment (for, as, of learning)

There will be no formal assessment for this lesson.



Connection to Last Lesson

This is the first lesson in the unit.



Flexible Groupings

Whole class, small groups.



Activating Strategies: Preparing for Learning

  • Teacher will come into class once all students are seated.

  • Teacher will be wearing a toga.

  • At first teacher will not respond to students comments about their attire.

Acquiring Strategies: Integrating and Processing Learning

  • Teacher will open power point with quotes from Roman/Greek empire.

  • There is a list in the MB curriculum document.

  • Teacher will read quotes and ask student to discuss them in small groups.

  • Discussion on importance of education.

  • Key people in education.

Applying Strategies: Consolidating Learning

  • Students will pick one of the people discussed in class and find 5 interesting facts about them.

  • Groups of 2.

  • Present to class.

Learning Resources

  • MB Social Studies Curriculum

  • Power point

  • Toga

Different Ways of Learning

  • Visual: power point

  • Auditory: class discussion

  • Intrapersonal: group discussion

Lesson 2: Greek Mythology

Subject: Social Studies

Grade: 7-8

Unit: Societies of Ancient Rome & Greece

Topic: Greek Mythology

Essential Skills/ Understanding(s)

  • The role of the Greek gods in ancient Greece.

  • How mythology affects society, then and now.

Learning Outcomes

KI-016: Describe the importance of Greek myths in ancient Greek culture.


VH-011: Appreciate stories, legends, and myths of ancient societies as important ways to learn about the past.
Assessment (for, as, of learning)

Students mind maps will be summatively assessed. The presentation of the Greek Gods will be formatively assessed.



Connection to Last Lesson

Second lesson in the unit.



Flexible Groupings

Individual, whole class, small groups.



Activating Strategies: Preparing for Learning

  • Using their prior knowledge of myths, legends, origin stories, and the traditional oral narratives of oral tradition of indigenous cultures, students generate a working description of the role, subject matter, influence, and importance of mythology in societies throughout history.

  • Students may wish to engage in a discussion about the relevance of myth and legend in modern times.

  • Prompting questions include: • Can myths teach us about certain subjects, or provoke thought? • What kinds of myths do we see in modern industrialized societies? • Do myths still influence people’s beliefs and values?

  • Students will start a list of where they have seen myths in today's society; ie. Percy Jackson.

Acquiring Strategies: Integrating and Processing Learning

  • Using print and electronic resources, collaborative groups of students research one of the major Greek gods, goddesses, or heroes.

  • They prepare an illustrated poster that summarizes the myth or story of this deity and explains his or her importance in Greek culture (e.g., values and beliefs, practices, art, rituals...).

  • Student posters are displayed in an area of the class designated as “Mount Olympus, Home of the Gods.”

  • After circulating to view the posters, students discuss which myths they consider to be the most relevant to life and values in modern societies.

Applying Strategies: Consolidating Learning

  • Students draw a Mind Map to illustrate the influence and importance of myths in ancient Greek culture.

  • Students may include illustrations or representations of the gods or goddesses of Mount Olympus, explaining their powers and their significance.

  • The Mind Map should depict the Greeks’ concept of the role of humans in relation to the gods (e.g., the concept of pleasing the gods, the concept of accepting one’s fate, the concept of not transgressing limits through human pride or “hubris,” differences and similarities between humans and the immortals...).

Learning Resources

  • MB Social studies curriculum

  • computers

  • Greek Myth books

Different Ways of Learning

Visual: posters, drawing

Interpersonal: individual work

Intrapersonal: group work

Auditory: storytelling

Linguistic: storytelling



Work Station: During free time students can practice their Greek Gods knowledge by using the work station. It has sets of cards to be used like "go fish" with Greek Gods.

Lesson 3:Everyday Greek Life

Subject: Social Studies

Grade: 7-8

Unit: Societies of Ancient Greece & Rome

Topic: Everyday Greek Life

Essential Skills/ Understanding(s)

  • Social structures of ancient Greece

  • Daily life in ancient Greece.

Learning Outcomes

KC-001: Describe the social organization of ancient Greece. Examples: classes of citizens, slavery; role and status of children, women, and men...



Assessment (for, as, of learning)

Journal will be summatively assessed.



Connection to Last Lesson

Continued learning on Greek society.



Flexible Groupings

Whole class, small groups.



Activating Strategies: Preparing for Learning

  • Using a Word Splash, pairs of students make predictions about social organization and daily life in the city-states of ancient Greece.

  • Pairs discuss and compare their predictions with those of another pair.

  • BLM 8.3.2.a : Word Splash: Greek Society

Acquiring Strategies: Integrating and Processing Learning

  • Collaborative groups of students read an informational text about Greek society (i.e., social structure, roles, classes, beliefs and values, daily life and culture, organization of the polis, governance in Sparta and Athens) to verify the predictions they have made about life in ancient Greece in the Activating phase of this learning experience.

  • Students represent their information in the form of an illustrated Mind Map to share with the class.

  • After viewing the Mind Maps, students discuss negative and positive aspects of life in Greek society, comparing it to life in modern society.

Applying Strategies: Consolidating Learning

  • Students write a journal entry reflecting on the city of ancient Greece where they would prefer to live: Sparta or Athens.

  • The reflection should include details of ways of life, social organization and roles, and values and beliefs.

Learning Resources

  • MB social studies curriculum

  • library to research

  • computer

Different Ways of Learning

Visual: mind map

Linguistic: research

Intrapersonal: group work



Lesson 4: Athens & Sparta

Subject: Social Studies

Grade: 7-8

Unit: Societies of Ancient Greece & Rome

Topic: Athens & Sparta

Essential Skills/ Understanding(s)

  • Comparison between Sparta and Athens.

Learning Outcomes

KC-001: Describe the social organization of ancient Greece. Examples: classes of citizens, slavery; role and status of children, women, and men...

KI-015: Compare and contrast life in Sparta and Athens. Examples: social roles, education, governance, beliefs...

Assessment (for, as, of learning)

Students will be summatively graded on their role playing group assignment.



Connection to Last Lesson

Continued learning on Greek society.



Flexible Groupings

Whole class, small groups.



Activating Strategies: Preparing for Learning

  • Using print and electronic resources, students gather information about the culture and social organization in the Greek city-states of Sparta and Athens.

  • Working in pairs, they create a Compare and Contrast chart of the two city- states.

  • Students share their charts with each other, and discuss how these differences may have led to the Peloponnesian Wars and the gradual erosion of Greek society

Acquiring Strategies: Integrating and Processing Learning

  • Using print and electronic resources, collaborative groups of students gather about the city-state of Athens or Sparta, including the social organization and roles, groups of people, and daily life.

  • Each group member selects one social role and creates a corresponding role card. Examples include:

• Elected politician • Orator • Olympic athlete

• Dramatic actor • Priest/priestess • Poet or playwright

• Soldier • Child at school • Married woman

• Unmarried woman • Slave • Wealthy citizen

• Farmer • Poor citizen • Philosopher

• Mathematician • Government official • Doctor

• Craftsperson • Merchant • Visiting foreigner


  • The role cards will be used later in this learning experience (see Applying strategies) as the basis for a skit or role-play about life in ancient Greece.

  • TIP: In this activity, divide the class in half: one half focuses on Sparta; the other half focuses on Athens. Students will later use the role cards to create and present a short play depicting daily life for various individuals living in their assigned polis.

Applying Strategies: Consolidating Learning

  • Collaborative groups of students create and present a short play depicting life and social roles in Sparta or in Athens, using the role cards prepared in the Acquiring phase of this learning experience.

  • Following the presentations, students exchange ideas and opinions about Greek views on slavery, women, the role of children, war, and the values that the Greeks believed essential to the “Good Life.”

  • After the presentations, students discuss the positive and negative aspects of life in ancient Greece.

  • TIP: This activity may be made simple or more elaborate, as time permits. Students may choose to dress in character with chitons, cloaks, or military apparel; they may also use props to support their role-play and depict the city in which they live.

Learning Resources

  • MB social studies curriculum

  • library to research

  • computer

Different Ways of Learning

Visual: compare/contrast

Linguistic: research

Intrapersonal: group work



Lesson 5: Democracy

Subject: Social Studies

Grade: 7-8

Unit: Societies of Ancient Greece & Rome

Topic: Democracy

Essential Skills/ Understanding(s)

  • Understand how democracy came to be.

  • Compare Canadian democracy to Greek democracy.

Learning Outcomes

KC-002: Describe the rise of democracy in ancient Greece.

KC-003: Compare criteria for citizenship and participation in government in ancient Greece and in contemporary Canada.

VC-001: Appreciate the contributions of ancient Greece to modern concepts of citizenship and democracy.



Assessment (for, as, of learning)

Formative assessment for group work in compare/contrast activities. Summative assessment for speech presentation.



Connection to Last Lesson

Continued learning on Greek society. Students have learned about democracy in previous units.



Flexible Groupings

Whole class, small groups.



Activating Strategies: Preparing for Learning

  • Students brainstorm ideas to create a web illustrating the concept of democracy.

  • Ideas generated by the students should be organized under key ideas (e.g., democratic principles, government, rights, responsibilities, citizenship, rule of law, equality, freedom, justice...).

  • Students view the webs and discuss Canadian democracy, including the benefits of living in a democratic society.


Acquiring Strategies: Integrating and Processing Learning

  • Students develop a Compare and Contrast chart of the criteria for citizenship and participation in government in Canada and in ancient Greece.

  • Students share their charts, discussing benefits of citizenship within a democracy and the contributions of ancient Greek democracy to modern democratic concepts (i.e., citizen participation in government, election by majority, rule of law, freedom of speech, equality of citizens, citizens’ right to justice, right to peaceful assembly...).

Applying Strategies: Consolidating Learning

  • Students develop a persuasive speech in the style of ancient Greek orators, designed to convince the class of the advantages of direct democracy as opposed to representative democracy.

  • Following the speeches, all members of the class vote on whether they agree or disagree with the position put forth by the orator.

Learning Resources

  • MB social studies curriculum

  • library to research

  • computer

Different Ways of Learning

Visual: compare/contrast

Linguistic: research

Intrapersonal: group work



Lesson 6: Government of Ancient Greece

Subject: Social Studies

Grade: 7-8

Unit: Societies of Ancient Greece & Rome

Topic: Government of Ancient Greece

Essential Skills/ Understanding(s)

  • Understand how democracy came to be.

  • Compare Canadian democracy to Greek democracy.

Learning Outcomes

KC-002: Describe the rise of democracy in ancient Greece.

KC-003: Compare criteria for citizenship and participation in government in ancient Greece and in contemporary Canada.

VC-001: Appreciate the contributions of ancient Greece to modern concepts of citizenship and democracy.



Assessment (for, as, of learning)

Students will be summatively assessed on their presentation of the types of government.



Connection to Last Lesson

Continued learning on Greek society. Students have learned about democracy in previous units.



Flexible Groupings

Whole class, small groups.



Activating Strategies: Preparing for Learning

  • Collaborative groups of students engage in discussion about the following question: “Can a society that is based on slavery, and that excludes women and immigrants from citizenship, be considered a democracy?”

  • Groups present a summary statement of their collective point of view to the class, and students discuss what they consider to be the essential characteristics of democracy.

  • These characteristics are recorded on chart paper, or in students’ learning journals, for further reference and discussion.


Acquiring Strategies: Integrating and Processing Learning

  • Students are divided into five groups to gather information on different forms of government as identified by Greek thinkers (Plato, Aristotle): tyranny, monarchy, oligarchy or aristocracy, and democracy.

  • Each group creates a two- or three-minute skit that portrays the concept or form of government they have been assigned.

  • Following each presentation, the class discusses differences and similarities among forms of government, and considers which forms they find to be the most just and/or the most effective.

Applying Strategies: Consolidating Learning

  • Pairs or triads of students create a series of three Venn diagram charts to compare various forms of government: Venn #1: Monarchy and Tyranny; Venn #2: Monarchy and Democracy; Venn #3: Tyranny and Democracy.

  • Students share the similarities and differences they discover in their collaborative groups.


Learning Resources

  • MB social studies curriculum

  • library to research

  • computer

Different Ways of Learning

Visual: compare/contrast

Linguistic: research

Intrapersonal: group work

Kinaesthetic: Plays

Lesson 7: Roman Empire

Subject: Social Studies

Grade: 7-8

Unit: Societies of Ancient Greece & Rome

Topic: Roman Empire

Essential Skills/ Understanding(s)


  • Understand the vastness of the Roman Empire.

  • Understand how Roman Empire grew to it's size at the peak.

Learning Outcomes

KL-025: Illustrate on a map the expansion of the Roman Empire.


KH-031: Identify people, events, and ideas in ancient Greece and Rome.
KP-047: Describe structures of governance in ancient Rome.
KP-048: Describe the nature of war and territorial expansion in the Roman Empire.
KE-055: Describe the influence of trade on the exchange of ideas within the Roman Empire and between Rome and other places in the world.
Assessment (for, as, of learning)

Students will be summatively assessed on their job posting. The rest of the lesson will be formatively assessed.



Connection to Last Lesson

Beginning of looking at the Roman Empire.



Flexible Groupings

Whole class, small groups.



Activating Strategies: Preparing for Learning

  • Using a map of the Roman Empire at its peak, collaborative groups of students brainstorm problems Rome may have encountered in trying to govern such a large and diverse territory.

  • Groups share their ideas with each other, considering the advantages and disadvantages of territorial expansion, and discussing how Rome dealt with these challenges.


Acquiring Strategies: Integrating and Processing Learning

  • Collaborative groups of students select two people, events, or ideas as research topics regarding the rise and expansion of the Roman Empire.

  • Using print and electronic resources, each group gathers information on the topic to create a one-page illustrated handout, summarizing the key points of their research to share with other students.

Applying Strategies: Consolidating Learning

  • Students create an announcement seeking candidates to fill a position in government, military, or trade in the Roman Empire.

  • The announcement should include a description of responsibilities, qualifications, expectations, the nature and location of the posting, and the benefits and salary associated with the position.

  • Announcements are shared with the class, and students discuss which roles they find to be the most difficult, or the most appealing, in ancient Rome.


Learning Resources

  • MB social studies curriculum

  • library to research

  • computer

Different Ways of Learning

Visual: compare/contrast

Linguistic: research

Intrapersonal: group work

Artistic: posters

Lesson 8: The Legacy of Ancient Greece & Rome

Subject: Social Studies

Grade: 7-8

Unit: Societies of Ancient Greece & Rome

Topic: The Legacy of Ancient Greece & Rome

Essential Skills/ Understanding(s)

Greek and Roman civilizations dominated European culture for many centuries and continue to have a profound impact on culture, language, thought, science, and the arts in contemporary societies.


Learning Outcomes

KH-032: Identify ways in which today’s world has been influenced by the ideas of ancient Greece and Rome. Examples: the arts, philosophy, science, mathematics...


KP-046: Identify factors that influenced the rise and decline of ancient Greece and Rome.
KE-056: Describe technologies and achievements in ancient Greece and Rome. Examples: architecture, transportation, weapons, aqueducts...
VI-005: Appreciate the enduring qualities of the arts, architecture, science, and ideas of ancient Greece and Rome.
Assessment (for, as, of learning)

Letters will be assessed on a rubric developed with students.



Connection to Last Lesson

End of the unit.



Flexible Groupings

Whole class, small groups.



Activating Strategies: Preparing for Learning

  • Students brainstorm a list of factors they believe may lead to the decline of a great civilization.

  • When the contribution of ideas begins to slow down, the ideas are sorted into category titles proposed by the students (e.g., problems inside the civilization, threats from outside, economic factors...).

  • Students discuss what they consider to be the most significant factors in the decline of civilizations.

Acquiring Strategies: Integrating and Processing Learning

  • Using print and electronic resources, students gather information to compare Greek and Roman gods and goddesses, and to learn of the influence of ancient religion on contemporary elements of culture, such as the calendar and astronomy.

  • Students may summarize their results in the form of a poster depicting the planet names and their origins, or the seven-day calendar and the origins of the names of the days of the week.

Applying Strategies: Consolidating Learning

  • Students write a letter to a writer, poet, playwright, leader, mathematician, scientist, general, or philosopher of Greece or Rome with the purpose of formally thanking her or him for the lasting contributions of their civilization to modern societies.

  • The letter should include concrete examples of the influence of classical antiquity and should supply the relevant historical information.

Learning Resources

  • MB social studies curriculum

  • library to research

  • computer

Different Ways of Learning

Visual: compare/contrast

Linguistic: research

Intrapersonal: group work

Artistic: posters

Closing Activities

For a closing activity we will have an Ancient Greece/Rome celebration. Each group will be responsible for dressing up as one part of Ancient Greece or Rome. They will create a booth to showcase their part.



Potential Booths:

  • Government

  • Gods

  • Military

  • Scholars

  • Theatre

Booths could include:

  • clothing

  • food

  • artefacts

  • posters

  • maps

Parents and other classes will be invited to partake in the celebration.




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