Iste standards Content: 1b. Students create original work as a means of personal or group expression



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ISTE Standards

Content:

1b. Students create original work as a means of personal or group expression

Students will create their ideal health care plan after viewing all the material from the three lesson plans; this material includes (the documentary Sicko, Frontline’s special Sick Around the World, the four podcasts from NPR, and the information found on the two websites they are to explore (whitehouse.gov, healthreform.gov). Their personal health plan will be based off the information they’ve learned and the discussions they had with their classmates.



3c. Students evaluate and select information sources and digital tools based on the appropriateness to specific tasks.

Students will know before we begin all three lesson plans that they are to create their own health care plan by the end of the three planned lessons. In lesson two, students will explore two different websites: whitehouse.gov/healthreform and healthreform.gov. Since these websites provide an abundance of information, students will need to be selective in their readings. Students will need to chose which information they need in order to create their ideal health plan. For example, on the website whitehouse.gov, students can chose to read about the law specifically, or look up myths and facts, they may also watch videos, or read about recent health care news. In lesson three, students will chose one podcast to listen to or read. Students know they need to create their own health care plan so they should listen to or read something that will aide them in their assignment.



4a. Students identify and define authentic problems and significant questions for investigation.

Each task students are to do including: (watching Sicko, exploring the two websites with information on the health reform, watching sick around the world, and listening to the NPR radio broadcasts) students will be given the opportunity to have their questions answered in class discussions. When students watch Sicko they will be asked if they feel the health care system in the U.S had problems. They will also be asked what specifically did they feel the problems were. Students will have to question what the pros and cons of each health care system is in Frontline’s Sick Around the World. Students will also have to define the problems in the U.S health care reform today. By creating their own plans students will also have to question how to make the best health care system.



4c. Students collect and analyze data to identify solutions and/or make informed decisions

By watching Sicko and Sick Around the World, students will get an overview of the U.S health care system and of health care systems around the world. Students will collect more data by reading about the health care system the U.S has today by navigating the two health reform websites I have provided for them. Students will also learn more from the NPR radio podcasts they will listen to on the U.S health care debate. After students have seen all the material, they will have to come up with their own health care plan. By creating their own health care plan, they will have to decide how to finance it and how to solve some of the problems the U.S health care system faces today.



Technology:

6a. Students understand and use technology systems

Students will explore two different websites. Students must understand how to open up an internet page. Students must also understand how and where to type a web address. Once students have reached the correct website, they must be able to navigate the website in order to find the specific information they need. Thus, students must understand how to click to the links they want to see and also how to go back to links they want to see again. If students want to watch videos on the website or listen to the NPR podcasts, students must also know how to adjust the volume and turn the speakers on.



6b. Students select and use applications effectively and productively

Students must use the internet to effectively gather information in order to create their own health care plan. Students must also type up their health care plan on word processor and then present their plan using PowerPoint to their classmates. Students must be able to adjust word processor because they are to use 12 point font, Times New Roman, 1 inch margins, and their work is to be double-spaced.




LESSON PLANS:

BEFORE YOU BEGIN:
Tell students they will be learning about some of the different health care systems in the world and will do some particular research and study of the new U.S health care reform.

>Let students know the overall plan before beginning any of the lessons.

>Tell students they will watch an older movie on the U.S health care system. A movie made in 2007 by Michael Moore.

>Tell students they will next watch a film on the health care systems in a number of different countries including Switzerland, Germany, Taiwan, Japan, and the U.K.

>Students will then learn about the new health care reform of the U.S. today.

>MAKE SURE students understand by the end of their learning they will then come up with a health care system of their own. Thus, through each lesson they should be considering what ideas they want to incorporate into the health care plan/system they are going to create.

The instructor should encourage an understanding and critical thinking through all three lessons.

Lesson Plan #1:
Students will watch the documentary Sicko as a class. The documentary can be found (for free) at http://www.documentarywire.com/sicko/. You just need to press play!

Instructor: The instructor should watch the film with students and be sure students are engaged. Tell students to take notes on their favorite story, things they feel are important to remember or want to discuss with the class, and, any notes that they may want to apply to the health plan they will complete on their own. Also, there will be a questionnaire, give this to students and have them read the questions over before they watch the film.

Students: Students should read over the questionnaire before watching the film. Students should also be taking notes that will help them answer the questionnaire and aide them in creating their own health care plan. Students should also write down any questions they may have about the film, perhaps things they do not understand or want to know more about.

Once the movie is over students should write a one page reflection on the film using the questionnaire they were given. Students do not need to answer all of the questions, just chose 4 or 5. Students should be given at least 20 to 30 minutes to write their reflection. These are the questions. To guide students in their reflection, these questions can be asked: (some of the questions may be found at http://www.healthcare-now.org/wp-content/uploads/pdf/sickoguide.ppt)

1. Recall a recent health care experience of your own. What made it positive or negative?

2. Which of the stories in the film resonated with you the most? Why?

3. Thinking of the experiences portrayed in the film, what are the major problems in the United States’ health care system? Why hasn’t it been “fixed”?

4. Do you think our government should be responsible for taking care of the health of working people? Of those who can’t work? Why or why not?


5. Some argue that if people make good money, they can afford to buy their own health care. What do you say to this, based on your own experience and knowledge?

6. Thinking about your entire career, when has health insurance been crucial for you and your family?

7. Using issues from the film and your own knowledge, articulate what you think is the best solution for our failing system.

8. If you were to begin helping reform the system, which area most speaks to you, your needs, and your history and experiences?


Instructor: While students are writing their reflections, the instructor should walk around the room and look over students work. The instructor should let students know he/she is available to students if they have any questions. Encourage critical thinking!

Once students have had sufficient time to answer a couple of the questions and write their reflection, there will be a class discussion.



Instructor: Ask students to share some of their answers. Ask students what confused them about the film. Ask students what questions they have about our health care system (You may not be able to answer all of these questions, tell students they will have the opportunity to look up some of their questions tomorrow in the computer lab). If students are quiet, share some of your thoughts about the film, this may help them get involved in the discussion. Tell them a personal story you may have with the U.S health care system. The instructor should guide students in their discussion by asking thought-provoking questions.

Questions may include:

What kind of emotions did this film provoke in you?

What didn’t you understand from the film?

Do you think there are problems with our health care system? What do these problems seem to be?

You may want to write a reflection yourself and read it to students. Perhaps if you share, they will share too.


Students: Students should share their answers to some of the questions. Students may read their reflections if they want. Students should reflect (respectfully) on the thoughts of their classmates and share thoughts they have of their own.

Discussions should last at least 30 minutes. If students are talkative discussions should go as long as students are engaged.




Lesson Plan #2:
Students will watch Sick Around the World. There are five chapters. All five chapters must be watched. All five chapters can be found at: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/sickaroundtheworld/view/. All you must do is press play. Once the first chapter is over, you can just click to the next one which is in the left hand corner that states CHAPTERS. There are five dots shown. Click the first dot to show the first chapter, click the second dot to show the second chapter etc.

Instructor: The instructor should tell students they should take notes on the similarities and differences of each countries health care system. Students should have a hand-out that looks like this to help guide them.
U.K:
Pros:
Cons:
Japan:
Pros:
Cons:
Germany:
Pros:
Cons:
Taiwan:
Pros:
Cons:
Switzerland:
Pros:
Cons:
Which country do you feel has the best system? Which country has the worst? Why do you feel this way?

The handout should be passed out before the film has begun. Give students a short example.


Taiwan: promises equal access to health care for all citizens. Population coverage reached 99%.National Health insurance policy is called NHI (National Health Insurance).

Pros: equal access to all citizens

Cons: government does not have enough money to cover the services.
Instructor: After each chapter give the students a chance to share some of their answers and have small class discussions. These discussions should be about ten minutes. Since the instructor can also watch the film, with the students, the instructor may share some of his/her answers as well. The instructor should conduct the discussion somewhat as follows.

What did the film say about Taiwan’s system?

Wait for feedback. If no students are saying much, provide some of the information you picked up from watching the film with the students.

What seemed to be some of the pros of Taiwan’s system?

(And so on, and so forth)

Students: While watching the film students should fill out the handout. Since the film is separated into five chapters, students can discuss some of their answers with other students after each chapter has finished.
Once all five chapters have been watched, the mini between chapter discussions have taken place, and students have completed the hand-out, another small class discussion should take place.

Instructor: Ask students if there were things they didn’t understand. Since the instructor should have watched the film with the students, they may share the understanding they got from the film. The instructor should encourage students to share any thoughts or feelings they have. The instructor can also share his/her thoughts or feelings about the film. The instructor should make sure students have a clear understanding of the different countries and their personal health care systems. Take 30 minutes to do so (or more if students are engaged and have a lot to say). The following webpage provides a summary of each country’s health care system. Instructors can look to this webpage to help students fill out the hand-out. (Instructors should make sure to discuss the way in which each plan is funded which is provided on this webpage). Take this opportunity to discuss “socialized medicine” and “social insurance.” The website gives a clear explanation of both.

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/sickaroundtheworld/countries/

Students: Students should have a clear understanding of the differences between each country’s health care plan. Students should know the cons and the pros to each plan and how each plan is funded. Students should turn in their hand-out completed.
Once class discussion is done, (it will end once the instructor feels students have a clear understanding of the different countries and their systems), students should be taken to the computer lab.

Once students have reached the computer lab, before students begin their next task, ask students what they know about the U.S health care system/reform happening today.



Instructor: If students do not have any answers give a short summary of the health reform. The instructor can find information at:

http://www.whitehouse.gov/healthreform and www.healthreform.gov

The instructor should explain to students there is a lot of confusion about the law because it is new and thus, the law is still being discussed. So tell students you may not know everything about the law either. Instructors should go to http://www.healthcare.gov/law/introduction/index.html to get an overview of the health care law. The instructor can use this website to get a good summary of the new U.S health care law.



Students: Once students have discussed some of the information they know about the new U.S health care reform, they should turn on their computers and open up the internet. Students should explore these two websites. http://www.whitehouse.gov/healthreform and www.healthreform.gov

Instructors: Before students begin exploring the websites provide them with a small hand-out to guide their exploration.
What is confusing?

What are the pros and cons to the new U.S health care system? What are some of the challenges?

What are some similarities to the U.S health-care system and the systems shown in Sick Around the World?

What are some differences?

What changes have been made in the U.S health care system since the film Sicko, if any?

How is the U.S health care system funded?

Will everyone be covered?
Instructors: All the answers to these questions can be found on these two websites and by prior knowledge of watching the films. Students should have 45 to 60 minutes to look at information. Students may talk with other students while exploring. The instructor should make sure the conversations are focused on the health care system. The instructor should remind students that they will be making their own health care plan so they should try to collect information that will aide them in doing so.

Here are some additional websites for instructors to help aide them in their teaching



http://www.balancedpolitics.org/universal_health_care.htm - this website provides some of the arguments against universal health care, along with some of the pros.
Students: Students should do their best to fill out the hand-out. Students should discuss their thoughts and answers with other students. Students should remember that you must make your own health care plan by the end of the three lessons. Students should consider components they want to incorproate into their health care plan. Students should consider how they will finance their plan, who their plan will cover, and how people will benefit from their plan.


Lesson Plan #3
Instructor: Take students to the computer lab. Students should be told they will listen to a number of pod casts from NPR on some of the current debates over the U.S health care reform.

Students are to go to http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=130052507

At the top of this website there will be a speaker in the left hand corner students will click on which will allow them to listen to the story. This story is short, about 3 minutes. This NPR listening discusses some of the benefits of the health care reform. There are also some of the arguments against the bill presented.

Instructors: Before students listen to the NPR podcasts give them a brief overview of what they are about to listen too. Tell them this first podcast is rather short and they should just listen carefully. Once they have all listened to the first three minute segment ask students about some of their thoughts. Give students a brief summary of what they are listening too. Obama talks about some of the benefits of the new health care reform along with some arguments against the bill.

Students: Students should listen to the NPR podcast. They may read along if they chose to with the speaker. Students should also take some notes on the pros and cons of the health care reform.
Instructor: Tell students they will listen to a second podcast about the same length of the first one.

This story can be found at: http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=129809849



The second listening concerns some of the most recent changes that will take place because of the new health care bill. Since you are teaching college students, this podcast will concern them. Tell students to note the new changes and some of the concerns Americans have about the bill.

Students: Students should listen to the podcast and note some of the current changes about to take place and also some of the concerns Americans have over the health care bill. Students should note whether they want some of these things included in their health care bill.
Instructor: Have students listen to a third podcast. Let students know this podcast will discuss an idea called rescission. Explain to students that rescission is defined as the unmaking of a contract. For example, insurance companies practice rescissions when they drop people because of a pre-existing condition. Students should have seen this in SiCKO. Here is the podcast:

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=124170302

Students: Students should listen to the podcast and take brief notes. Students can read along and listen to the podcasts as many times as they want.
The point of students listening to these podcasts is to be in tune with the recent activity of the U.S health care reform. They should understand what is currently happening with health insurance and some of the challenges the U.S is facing.
Instructor: After students have listened to the three podcasts assigned tell students to find another podcast concerning the health care debate. Students should type in something to do with health care into the search engine in the right hand top corner of the page. Provide students with examples of what they could type in. Some samples include: “health care debate” or “health care and insurance” or “U.S health care reform.” Ask students what else they want to know about health care and have them look for their particular interests concerning the debate. A couple of students may end up listening to the same pod cast. This is fine. Give students at least 45 minutes to complete this. Tell students they are to write down the title, author, and a summary of what their pod cast was about.

Students: Students are to go to http://www.npr.org/. In the top right hand corner there is a title that reads SEARCH with a box to the right of it. Students should click on the box and search for a little bit more information concerning the U.S health care reform. They may type anything into the box that has to do with the CURRENT U.S HEALTH CARE REFORM. Students should find a podcast to listen to or one they want to read, students should take notes. Students should write down the title, author, and a summary of what their podcast or reading was about. Students should have 45 minutes to do so.
Once students have listened or read something more about health care and written their summary, they may return to the classroom. Once students have returned to the classroom, the instructor should go around the room and ask students to share what they’ve listened too. Tell students they may read their summary or simply discuss the podcast they chose with their classmates. The new information students have to share should help students learn even more about the new health care law.

TEACHER INFORMATION: Some further information on the health care reform can be found at the following websites:



http://circ.ahajournals.org/cgi/content/full/101/16/2015

http://www.whitehouse.gov/healthreform

www.healthreform.gov

http://www.nhchc.org/singlepayer.html


Test/Assessment:
Students should write their own basic health care plan and then present their plan to the class. Students should use word processor (Times New Roman, 12 point Font, Margins should be an inch on both sides, double-spaced.

Instructor: Tell students they must create their own health care plan. The instructor should make it clear that this is a very general plan. It is difficult to identify all the components of a health care plan since they are extensive. Tell students you want to write a paragraph or more that answers each question. Students should make sure to write a paragraph for each question:



QUESTIONS:

1. How will your health care plan be financed? (by the government, or by the individual). What will policies for insurance companies entail? Will you use single payer health insurance? Will it be considered socialized medicine? Or social insurance? (as discussed in lesson two). Define these terms. If your plan runs on “social insurance” describe what it is and how it works.

2. Who will be covered in the plan?

3. Why is your plan the best plan? (What are the pros and cons of your plan?)

4. What are some similarities to your plan and the U.S health care plan? How different are the two plans? (List three to four differences/similarities).

LET STUDENTS KNOW THESE QUESTIONS


By the end of all three lessons I want students to understand how health care works. I want them to understand a little bit about insurance companies. I want them to completely understand some of the different ways health care systems are financed. I also want them to understand some of the challenges the U.S faces with trying to provide universal health care and some of the benefits to the new plan. They should also understand how it affects them (their particular cohort which should be about 18-30).

By creating a personal health care plan students must have an understanding of insurance companies and financing of health care. Students will also have to understand some of the pros and cons of having a universal health care system. Some students may chose to take a more conservative route and not make their plan universal. Whether students chose a liberal or conservative view, students must understand the components of a health care system in order to create their plan. An understanding of how health care systems work (around the world and in the U.S) is what students should have by the end of the lessons.

PRESENTATION: Once students have come up with a plan students should present their plan with a powerpoint presentation using 5 to 7 slides (the student should include pictures). Students should identify 4 main points.

Students collect and analyze data to identify solutions and/or make informed decisions

After students have seen all the material through the lesson plans, they will have to take the data they‘ve learned and identify solutions to some of the challenges the health care systems around the world face today. By creating their own health care plan, students will have to inform their classmates of their final decisions in creating what they believe to be the best health care plan.



Students understand and use technology systems

Students must understand how to use and listen to podcasts, type web addresses into the internet, use the volume system on the computer, and watch videos if they chose to on whitehouse.gov. In creating their health care plan students must also understand how to use Microsoft word and powerpoint. Students also may need to be internet savvy to include pictures in their powerpoint presentations.



Students select and use applications effectively and productively

Students will have to use their time wisely and select computer links and applications that will be most beneficial to them in creating their personal health care plan. Students must be able to effectively chose the information they need in order to complete their assignment.



Students identify and define authentic problems and significant questions for investigation

Students are going to need to identify some of the problems with universal health care in order to create an ideal plan. They will define the problems in some of the health care systems in Taiwan, Germany, Switzerland, the U.K, and Japan. The instructor has given them some significant questions but as students create their plan they will notice these questions will leave some other questions up to investigation. For example I asked them to tell me how their plan will be financed. Students will then have to investigate what may be the best way to finance the plan. Thus, they will ask themselves is social insurance best? Is socialized medicine best? Etc.



Students create original work as a means of personal or group expression

Students work will be original because it they will be creating a their own personal health care plan. In the lesson plans students will have had multiple discussions with their classmates so their plan may also incorporate some of the ideas they picked up from their classmates. Thus, their plans will be a combination of their own ideas with some of the group’s ideas.



Students evaluate and select information sources and digital tools based on the appropriateness to specific tasks. Students must give the instructor a typed written plan and present a powerpoint presentation on the health care plan. Thus, students will need to use digital tools based on the appropriateness of their assignment. Such tools may include powerpoint, Microsoft word, and the internet.

Instructor: Look for the answers to these questions both in their word-document plan and their powerpoint presentation.

How is the plan financed?

Who is covered?

What are the pros and cons to their plan?

What are the differences and similarities of the current U.S health care plan?

Each question should be worth 5 points. If all four questions are answered, students may receive all 20 points. If students miss one question 15/20. If students have not completely answered the question in detail they should be docked points. For example, if they only give the pros and don’t say anything about the cons of their plans they should receive a 3/5 for that question. Students may feel they do not have any cons to their plan and that is fine, but they must say so! For who should be covered if students say everyone they must explain how. This may tie into question number one. If they chose to have their plan have social insurance. They must explain how this works. For example, in social insurance: all citizens are required to have health insurance, either through their work or purchased from a nonprofit, community-based plan. Those who can't afford the premiums receive public assistance. Most health insurance is private; doctors and almost all hospitals are in the private sector. There are no gatekeepers; You can go to any specialist when and as often as you like. This was taken from the website in lesson two.



http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/sickaroundtheworld/countries/

The last question concerning the differences/similarities of the U.S health care bill should address 3-4 differences and/or similarities.



Reflection:
Using web resources to teach about the health care system helps the students learn and the instructor teach in multiple ways. Web resources are 1) constantly being updated, 2) are accessible with one tool (a computer), 3) offer an array of learning materials suitable to the individual person, and 4) allow students to choose their particular area of interest. The health care system is a very complex topic to both learn and teach. The problem with political issues is they are constantly changing. The U.S health care reform is still being discussed and updated today. This makes teaching and learning about its policies quite complicated.

Web resources are critical in teaching political issues because web resources are constantly being updated. Web resources are consistently being updated. A textbook can only be updated right before it is published. The challenges and debates the U.S health care reform is changing everyday. The websites I chose are being updated everyday, thus the students are getting the most recent information. Teaching about the health care reform by using web resources also cuts down on the amount of material a teacher must be prepared with. The instructor needs a working computer. If there is no computer lab in the schools, the instructor could have students listen to the podcasts as a class and even explore the two websites on one computer as a class. The teacher does not need to rent films, buy a TV and DVD player, or require an expensive textbook. The instructor simply needs a working computer with internet access.



Web resources also give students the opportunity to learn about health care with an array of learning materials such as films, podcasts, and reading materials. Political jargon can be quite boring. Thus, many of the websites I asked students to consider were websites with videos, material to read, and pod casts to listen too. Having all these tools available to students allows students to be more independent in their learning. A textbook students must read, a video students must watch, and a recording students must listen too. Perhaps one student likes to read and the another would rather listen to a recording. With web resources students can chose the learning method that suits them best. Web resources not only allow them to chose their favorite learning method, but by exploration of the two websites, students are free to chose to read information they are most interested in. A textbook often confines a student to the chapters it provides. The two websites provided are elaborate with an abundance of information. Students can click on links they want to know more about.



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