Immigration and Migration in the New World



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TAH 2

American History Cover Page

Immigration and Migration in the New World



BY
Sharla Gray

Jen Schwantes

Alex Moores
HM4-T2-A
Summer 2006

Grade Level: 4
Standards Addressed:

A. Social Studies

HSS 4.4.3

HSS 4.4.4

HSS 4.51
B. English/Language Arts

ELA 1.1

ELA 2.4

ELA 2.5

R 2.2


R 2.5

R 2.6


R 3.3

W 2.2


W 2.4

LS 1.1


LC 1.4
Unit Goal: People in the past and present immigrate and migrate to better their lives.

State Adopted Text: Houghton Mifflin, Theme 2, “American Stories”
Selection 1: Thomas and the Library Lady

Objective:
Selection 3: Boss of the Plains

Objective: Students will describe the life of a gold miner, compare that life to their own, and form opinions about their findings after reading the story Boss of the Plains. They will be using a graphic organizer to organize their information. They will then present their findings by re-enacting a skit.
Selection 4: A Very Important Day

Objective: Students will examine and analyze immigration to the United States by reading the story A Very Important Day and real world interviews of actual immigrants. They will create their own list of relevant questions and proceed to give a mock interview of a fictitious immigrant.

Lesson 1

Migration and Immigration in the New World

by Jen Schwantes
Grade 4: Language Arts and History/Social Science
I. LESSON OVERVIEW:
Using non-fiction pieces of text on websites, students will discuss migration in the early United States. They will be evaluating this new expository information by drawing conclusions and making judgements on what they have read. The goal of the lesson is to get students thinking about the experience people had from migration in historical times. This lesson is aligned to support the Houghten-Mifflin selection, Tomas and the Library Lady, in the 4th grade Theme 2 series "American Stories."
II. STANDARDS ADDRESSED:
A. History/Social Science

* HSS 4.4.3 Discuss immigration and migration to California

between 1850-1900.

* HSS 4.4.4 Describe American immigration, internal

migration, settlement, and growth of towns and cities.
B. English/Language Arts

* ELA 1.1 Read expository text aloud with appropriate grade

level fluency

* ELA 2.4 Evaluate new information

* W 2.2 Write a response to literature which demonstrates an

understanding to the literary work

* W 2.4 Write summaries that contain the main ideas of the

reading selection and the most significant details


III. TEXT RESOURCES/MATERIALS NEEDED:
* HM Theme 2 Teacher's Edition, pp. 158-177

* Pencil/Paper

* HM Practice Workbook pp. 81-83
IV. DIFFERENTIATION:
A. Materials

* HM 4th grade Text



  • Pencil/Paper

  • Computers (2 students per computer)

  • Video clip of “Winged Migration”

  • Chart Paper

  • Clipboards for computer lab (optional)

  • Paper on clipboard with the posed question “What ideas (judgements) can you make about the relationship between the N.A. and the settlers on the Oregon trail, and why?”

B. Teaching Strategies




  • Guided reading for text passage for students who need it

  • Vocabulary background pre-teaching: migration, immigration

Emigration, economy, political, eager, borrow, glaring

  • Partner Share

  • Taking notes

  • Drawing

  • Sentence starters

V. INTRODUCTION


Students have read the story Tomas and the Library Lady in Theme 2 of Houghten-Mifflin. Teacher introduces the topic of migration by showing a brief clip from the video "Winged Migration" with the prefaced question of "What are some reasons why birds would migrate to a new area/land?" After clip, teacher puts a sentence starter on the board reading, "Birds may migrate to a new area because....". AD sentence starter is used by students who wish to share their response to generate use of academic vocabulary in their speech.
T. asks, "Do you think people migrate?" "What are some examples of why they might migrate?" Teacher starts off the discussion with a sentence starter, "People might migrate because the parent got a new job." Teacher takes three students responses, then asks for them to share their idea with a partner.
T. asks, "What is an example of migrating for health reasons?" Teacher models example first, then partner share, then whole class share.
T. asks, "What is an example of migrating for economic reasons?" Teacher model example first, then partner share, then whole class share.
Students take out a paper and pencil. Teacher writes down KWL chart on board with MIGRATION as the topic. Students work in groups of three to complete the K and W columns. Early finishers write a response (on the back of KWL chart) to the question, "In thinking of Tomas and the Library Lady, why do you think migration is so important in American History?"
VI. THROUGH
1. Students work in partners for computer technology work

(preferably in a computer lab) - students need pencil and paper

2. Students will go to the historical website (student friendly):

http://www.isu.edu/%7Etrinmich/Native.html

With this question in mind "What ideas (judgments) can you make about the relationship between the N.A. and the settlers on the Oregon trail, and why?" Students read aloud two times (one time each student to practice their reading fluency) "The Native Americans on the Oregon Trail: Relationships." They respond to the question together in note form.
For EL learners, a copy of the website can be photocopied and passes out for guided reading with the teacher.

For GATE students, when finished, they can continue reading the expository text on the site with their partner.

Teacher takes comments from students in ideas about question and what they read.
If time permits, students can impose the same question using

the website:

http://www.isu.edu/%7Etrinmich/funfacts.html#anchor266789
VII. BEYOND


  1. In partners, students create a web with "migration" in the center. With their partner, they list as many facts as they can about the experience of migrating in the 1800's. These facts can include events, feelings, people, materials, etc. that relate to the act of migrating.




  1. Early finishers can draw pictures to accompany their words.




  1. If time permits, students can briefly share aloud with the class their webs using as much vocabulary lesson-related as possible.




  1. A follow-up activity is to have students create diary/journal entry (monologue) of a person while migrating on the Oregon trail. This person can be a man, woman, child, Native American, etc. Teacher groups students in groups of 4. Then a couple students can share their own with the whole class.




  1. Tell students that the next few stories they’ll reading will also be around the topic of migration, and what reasons prompted people decided to migrate.



Lesson 2

IMMIGRATION AND MIGRATION IN THE NEW WORLD

Sharla Gray



HM4-T2-A
Grade 4: Language Arts and History/Social Science


  1. LESSON OVERVIEW:




After reading the story, Boss of the Plains, students will describe the life of a gold miner, compare that life to their own, and form opinions about their findings. They will be using a graphic organizer to organize their information. They will then present their findings by re-enacting a skit. This lesson is designed to align with the Houghton-Mifflin Language Arts Reading Series for 4th grade: Theme 2, “American Stories”.





  1. STANDARDS ADDRESSED:




  1. History/ Social Science

  • HSS 4.3: Students explain the economic, social, and political life in California from the Gold Rush.

  • HSS 4.3.3 Analyze the effects of the Gold Rush on settlements, daily life, politics, and physical environment.

  1. English/ Language Arts

  • ELA 2.5 Compare and contrast information on the same topic after reading several passages or articles.

  • R 2.6 Distinguish between cause and effect and between fact and opinion in expository text.






  1. TEXT RESOURCES/ MATERIALS NEEDED:




  • http://edweb.sdsu.edu/wip/examples/goldrush/

  • HM Theme 2 Teacher’s Edition, pp. 220-239.

  • Large class Venn Diagram

  • Pencil/paper


IV. DIFFERENTIATION:


a. Materials

  • Pictures of Gold Rush time period

  • Graphic Organizer: Venn Diagram (found out the Houghton Mifflin website)

  • Copies of Louise Clappe's letter paraphrased and simplified

  • Copies of the rubric (already passed out at the beginning of the story)

  • Calling cards that have student names on it



  1. Teaching Strategies




  • Pre-teach vocabulary: adventure, frontier, opportunity, pioneers, settlers

  • Activate prior knowledge

  • Model how to use a Venn Diagram

  • Pair/Share

  • Re-teach cause and effect




V. INTRODUCTION:


1. Have students pair/share some questions. What if you had lived in the past? What would your life be like? If you could go back in time, what time period would interest you? How can we find out what it would be like to live at a different time?

2. Look at the PowerPoint presentation from the website of the Museum of the City of San Francisco as a class. It shows gold miners in California during the California Gold Rush. Discuss the following: What types of jobs are they doing? What do they do for fun? Would you like to be a gold miner? How do the gold miners feel about their work? What kinds of problems do the miners have to overcome?

3. Find out about the ways people lived in the past by reading letters and diaries written by the people. Read Louise Clappe's letter to her sister to find out more. Was the life of a miner glamorous? Did the miners have health care in case of an accident?

4. Listen to this miner's song about life during the gold rush. Was the life of a miner glamorous? Did the miners have health care in case of an accident?

(Lesson Plan and materials found at http://edweb.sdsu.edu/wip/examples/goldrush/)



VI. THROUGH:


  • Teach students how to organize information from several resources by using a Venn diagram.

  • Model several examples from sample Venn diagram to get students started. Discuss cause and effect and fact vs. opinion while modeling this graphic organizer.

Students will create a Venn Diagram comparing their life to the life of a miner in the 19th century.

In addition to the link to the Museum of the City of San Francisco, students can also explore the site of the Oakland Museum of California and a site created by PBS for Gold Rush education to find information for the Venn Diagram. Another interesting site is Women in the Gold Rush.






VII. BEYOND:


  • After students have completed a Venn diagram, they will get together in groups to present a dramatization of an event in the life of a gold miner.

  • The students will perform a skit re-enacting a scene from their research.

  • Students will be scored using a rubric that was passed out at the beginning of the story based on factual information, creativity, and completion.

  • Follow up the next day with a KWL chart to see if there are any areas that need to be cleared up.



IMMIGRATION AND MIGRATION TO THE NEW WORLD

Lesson 3
By Alex Z. Moores

Group # HM4-T2-A


Grade 4: Language Arts and History/Social Science


  1. LESSON OVERVIEW:




Students will examine and analyze immigration to the United States by reading of the story “A Very Important Day” and real-world interviews of actual immigrants. They will create their own list of relevant questions and proceed to give a mock interview of a fictitious immigrant. This lesson is designed to be used with Houghton-Mifflin’s Theme 2, “American Stories”, for fourth grade.





  1. STANDARDS ADDRESSED:




  1. History/ Social Science


  • HSS 4.51= Discuss what the U.S. Constitution is and why it is important.

  • HSS 4.43= Discuss immigration and migration to California between 1850 and 1900, the countries of origin and their locations, and conflicts and accords among diverse groups.

  • HSS 4.44= Describe rapid American immigration, internal migration, settlement, and the growth of towns and cities.



  1. English/ Language Arts




  • Reading 2.2= Use reading strategies (Question)

  • Reading 2.5= Compare and Contrast (US/CA Constitutions)

  • Reading 3.3= Character traits and motivation

  • Listening and Speaking 1.1= Ask and respond to questions

  • Language Conventions 1.4= Parentheses, commas, and apostrophes






  1. TEXT RESOURCES/ MATERIALS NEEDED:




  • Theme 2, “American Stories”, teachers manual

  • Practice Book

  • Citizenship rules and processes

  • US and CA Constitutions

  • Immigration vocabulary Powerpoint

  • Article Rubric/Assessment and Speaking Rubric




IV. DIFFERENTIATION:


a. Materials


  • Student copies of HM pages 249-269

  • Practice book pages 129, 130, 134, 138, 139, 140, 141

  • Graphic organizer- compare/contrast

  • Student copies of naturalization and immigration processes

  • Assignment directions/rubric

  • Writing dialogue worksheet



  1. Teaching Strategies




  • Introduce, listen to, and read story

  • Model of dialogue and skit writing

  • PAL partners

  • Writing and Speaking Assessments

  • Academic vocabulary terms (citizen, allegiance, oath, citizenship,

examiner, obliged)

  • Visual aids (overhead of world map and naturalization process,

video tape of a professional interview, Powerpoint)



V. INTRODUCTION:


Students will have read a summary of the story, listened to the story on tape, and read the story with a partner. They would have identified and located places from where the immigrants of the story came from. They will have done an academic vocabulary activity. The students will do Practice Book pages 129, 130, 134, 138, 139, 140, 141. Finally, they will have done a compare and contrast of the US/CA Constitutions.
The teacher will show a Powerpoint of immigrants talking about their experience.

click here for immigration stories


Think/Pair/Share

1. After the Powerpoint, the teacher will ask, “Where are some places in which you’ve gone somewhere new to you?”

“For example, maybe you have been new to a school or a new church.”

Students will brainstorm a list of places where people have been new to a place.

2. Teacher will say, “Now, in your mind, choose a place from the list or from your own experiences where you have been new to a place. Then write down a short note about the experience you had and how it felt to be new.”

Students will write.

3. Teacher will say, “Turn to your partner and share.”

Students will share.





VI. THROUGH:
1. Students will work individually. They will pretend that they are a reporter for a newspaper covering the very important day of a gathering of new citizens/immigrants.

2. Students will write a newspaper article pretending they are a reporter doing a story on one of the families at the citizenship ceremony. They will write a description of the ceremony. They must include some information they learned about what immigrants must do to become new citizens and what happened at the ceremony. They must also include questions that they could ask the immigrant family and imaginative answers as if they were the family.

3. Teacher will review the rubric for the article.


VII. BEYOND:

1. Students will work in pairs. They will be given an interview from the immigrant interview website. click here for immigration stories They will have to read the interview.

2. After they read, they will have to create questions, which can be answered from the interview that they read. Once they write the questions, they will answer the questions in their own words based upon how their immigrant told their story.

3. Finally, they will perform a mock interview in front of the class. The pair will have to choose beforehand who is going to be the interviewer and who will be the interviewee.

4. They will have a speaking rubric for the activity.



Immigration and Migration in the New World

Culminating Activity


HM4-T2-A

Grade 4: Language Arts and History/Social Science




  1. Lesson Overview:

Over the past few weeks, students have been practicing how to write dialogue. Furthermore, they have been working on a unit that focuses on people in the past and present immigrating and migrating to better their lives in the New World. In this lesson, students will take what they have learned in the unit and write and perform a skit about migration or immigration. This lesson correlates with Theme 2 in the Houghton Mifflin 4th grade series.


  1. Standards Assessed:

HSS 4.3.3 Analyze the effects of the Gold Rush on settlements, daily life, politics, and the physical environment (e.g., using biographies of John Sutter, Mariano Guadalupe Vallejo, Louise Clapp).

HSS 4.4.3 Discuss immigration and migration to California between 1850 and 1900, including the diverse composition of those who came; the countries of origin and their relative locations; and conflicts and accords among the diverse groups (e.g., the 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act).

HSS 4.4.4 Describe rapid American immigration, internal migration, settlement, and the growth of towns and cities (e.g., Los Angeles).

LS 2.1 Make narrative presentations:




  1. Text Resources/ Materials Needed:

  • Text from previous lessons

  • Template for writing skit

  • Props (if needed)

  • Rubric for scoring




  1. Differentiation:
  1. Materials


  • EL and special ed. students can choose a scene from the book instead of writing their own.

  1. Teaching Strategies

  • Heterogeneous grouping

  1. Introduction:

1. Teacher will say, “We’ve been studying immigration and migration for this unit. Now we’re going to watch a short video clip on an immigration story called “Sarah, Plain and Tall”.

2. After the movie, teacher will discuss and review the issues surrounding immigration and migration.

3. Teacher will explain to students that they will now get a chance to write and perform their own skit about a family coming to a new land.




  1. Through:

1. Teacher gets students into groups. Their first task is to choose characters.

2. Students will begin to write their dialogue based upon the rubric they will be given. They must have a simple beginning, middle, and end. In the beginning the skit must include where the family came from, where they are going, and why they are going. In the middle they should include an obstacle that they encountered. In the end they need to show that the problem is resolved and how they feel in the new place.


  1. Once they are done they will be given time to practice their skit and to develop props.

  2. Perform skits.

  3. Teacher will assess groups based upon the speaking and content rubric.




  1. Beyond:

1. Students will be given a Venn Diagram.



2. They will compare and contrast the skits based upon migration reasons, problems faced, and feelings of the immigrants in the new land.


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