I. Colonial Time 1607 1775


II. American Revolution – Early Republic ( 1776 – 1800)



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II. American Revolution – Early Republic ( 1776 – 1800)
1. To what extent did economic issues provoke the American Revolution? ( 74)
2. The Declaration of Independence has been variously interpreted as a bid for French

support, an attempt to swing uncommitted Americans to the revolutionary cause, a

statement of universal principles, and an affirmation of the traditional rights of

Englishmen. To what extent, if any are these interpretations in conflict? ( 75)


3. During the seventeenth and increasingly in the eighteenth century, British colonists in

America charged Great Britain with violating the ideals of rule of law, self government, and, ultimately, equality of rights. Yet the colonists themselves violated these ideals in their treatment of blacks, Native Americans, and even poorer classes of white settlers. Assess the validity of this view. (79)


4. Despite the view of some historians that the conflict between Great Britain and its

thirteen North American colonies was economic in origin, in fact the American

Revolution had its roots in politics and other areas of American life. Assess the

validity of this statement. ( 86)


5. This history of the present King of Great Britain is a history of repeated injuries and

usurpation, all having in direct object, the establishment of an absolute tyranny over

these States. Evaluate this accusation made against George III in the Declaration of

Independence. (88)

6. Analyze the extent to which the American Revolution represented a radical alteration

in American political ideas and institutions. Confine your answer to the period 1775

to 1800. (97)


  1. Analyze the degree to which the Articles of Confederation provided an effective

form of government with respect to any TWO of the following:

Foreign relations

Economic conditions Western lands ( 96)
8. Evaluate the relative importance of domestic and foreign affairs in shaping American

politics in the 1790’s. (94)


9. The Bill of Rights did not come from a desire to protect the liberties won in the

American Revolution, but rather from a fear of the powers of the new federal

government. Assess the validity of the statement. (91)
10. Evaluate the relative importance of the following as factors prompting Americans to

rebel in 1776:

Parliamentary taxation British military measures

Restriction of civil liberties The legacy of colonial religious and political ideas (92)


11. “ Our prevailing passions are ambition and interest; and it will be the duty of a wise

government to avail itself of those passions, in order to make them subservient to

the public good.”

Alexander Hamilton, 1787


How was this viewpoint manifested in Hamilton’s financial program as Secretary

of the Treasury? ( 71)


12. What evidence is there for the assertion that the basic principles of the Constitution

were firmly grounded in the political and religious experience of America’s

colonial and revolutionary periods? (84)
13. Between 1783 and 1800, the new government of the United States faced the same

political, economic , and constitutional issues that troubled the British

government’s relations with the colonies prior to the Revolution. Assess the

validity of this generalization. (80)


14. In the two decades before the outbreak of the American Revolutionary War, a

profound shift occurred in the way many Americans thought and felt about the

British government and their colonial governments. Assess the validity of this

statement in view of the political and constitutional debate of these decades. (89)


15. What evidence is there for the assertion that the basic principles of the Constitution

were firmly grounded in the political and religious experience of America’s

colonial and revolutionary periods. (84)




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