History of african american people: beginnings to present



Download 136.66 Kb.
Date07.03.2016
Size136.66 Kb.

HISTORY OF AFRICAN AMERICAN PEOPLE: BEGINNINGS TO PRESENT


PRE-LEARNING Description (First Week)


Content

What to teach



Resources/Learning Activities

How to teach & with what




Student Performance Expectations

What students should be able to do with mastery




Student prior knowledge about the geography of Africa and level of writing will be assessed using lesson to target those skills.




AAL 9pg. 227 , Excerpt from Dream From my Father, Barack Obama



SP1.1 Students will be able to infer why it is that people come to the Unites States from African and other foreign lands

UNIT 1 DESCRIPTION: Human Beginnings in Africa

The continent of Africa is the birthplace of early hominids and therefore human civilization. It is a land rich with natural resources. Its land masses provide habitats for varied and unique forms of life. The resources of the African continent have historically been coveted by other populations who wished to dominant and control it.




By exploring African geography & anthropological evidence, students will analyze factors and techniques that various individuals used to expand the knowledge based that encouraged scientist & explorers from all over the world onto the continent. Students will investigate the ancient clues, conditions, actions, interpretations and motivations that helped to shape the modern world. Students will develop the context and skills needed to formulate and defend the African continent as a vital part of the world’s history and economy.

Unit 1 will be investigated through a focus on the following National Curriculum Standards for Social Studies themes:



  • Time, Continuity, and Change

  • How do we use knowledge of the past to evaluate the possible consequences of specific courses of action and make more informed decisions?

  • Global Connections

  • What types of global connections exist in the community, state, region, and nation, and what are their consequences?

  • How do location, resources, and cross-cultural diffusion cause tension, as well as lead to positive global connections?

Unit 1 Essential Question(s):

What to think about



NCSS, COMMON CORE STATE & NYS SOCIAL STUDIES STANDARDS

Content


Resources/Learning Activities

How to teach & with what



Student Performance Expectations

What students should be able to do with mastery



EQ1.1: What features make up Africa’s geographic diversity?

EQ1.2 How do physical and human geography affect people, places and regions?

EQ 1.3: What evidence is there that Africa was the birthplace of humanity?


NYSGG #3K1: Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of the geography of the interdependent world in which we live - local, national, and global - including the distribution of people, places, and environments over the Earth’s surface.

CCRH6: Compare the point of view of two or more authors for how they treat the same or similar topics, including which details they include and emphasize in their respective accounts.

* Identify and analyze reactions to science and technology from the past or present, and predict ongoing effects in economic, geographical, social, political, and cultural areas of life.

CCW1.b - Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly, supplying data and evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both claim(s) and counterclaims in a discipline-appropriate form and in a manner that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level and concerns.




C1.1. Physical Geography

• 2nd largest continent

• Rivers/lakes, deserts, semi-deserts, mountains & savannahs

• Climate zones



  • Political names

C1.2. Human geography/ Human survival:

  • Natural resources by region

• along the Nile

• the Sahel



  • the Sahara

  • the coast(s)

C1.3. Birthplace of Humanity

  • Paleoanthropologist

  • Archaeological evidence

  • Hominids/homo erectus/homo- sapiens

  • Oldest skeletons: Ardi & Dinqinesh (Lucy)

  • Hunter/gather; nomadic groups

  • Early Migration of human population.




Vocabulary – See unit 1 vocab. list. Create your own vocabulary activities.

Maps Skills- Teach students to understand how to develop and use maps and other graphic representations to display geographic issues, problems, and questions

  • http://printable-maps.blogspot.com/2008/08/printable-africa-map.html

  • http://www.eduplace.com/ss/maps/pdf/afr_asia_pol.pdf (blank)

  • http://www.eduplace.com/ss/maps/pdf/afr_asia_pol.pdf (blank)

Readings

  • AAH: pg. 6-8

  • LFH: pg. 1

Student Reading/Activities:

  • Articles on Lucy in Ethiopia: http://www.selamta.net/Lucy.htm

  • NPR Story/interview on Ardi: http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=1295624

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=113435496

  • Read AAL, p. 5-6

  • Read AAH: pg. 7-9

  • Read LFH: pg. 2 “Heritage”- Countee Cullen

  • Read “First Man”- Naomi Long Madgett, p.9, A & B

  • Watch Discovery of skeleton video Ethiopia http://www.reuters.com/video/2009/10/02/early-human-skeleton- discovered?videoId=112428

  • Examine Kenyan Footprint http://abcnews.go.com/Video/playerIndex?id=7008321

  • Study Pearson AP ‘From Human Prehistory to the Early Civilizations’ & answer online questions http://wps.ablongman.com/long_stearns_wcap_4/18/4646/1189432.cw/index.html

  • Glencoe Student Web Activity; Hominids leave Africa for Israel: Chapter 1, Student Web Activities, Glencoe World History: The Human Experience: The Early Ages, Glencoe, 2003

Teacher Reading:

  • Read the sections entitled “Background’ at the beginning of each unit of the New Jersey African American History curriculum:

http://slic.njstatelib.org/NJ_Information/Digital_Collections/AAHCG/index.html


SP1.1 Using a blank outline map, students will be able to accurately identify the names and locations of a minimum of 10 African countries along with their correct geographic locations.

SP1.1 Students will correctly identify 5 major geographic features on the African continent from memory.

SP1.2 Students will demonstrate their knowledge of the vast natural resources offered from Africa by writing a paper on how people from two different regions utilized, adapted and or were affected by the natural resources in their environment .

SP1.3 Students will write an engaging factual news article for a student newspaper about the discovery of Lucy or Ardi.

SP1.3 Students will develop a list of discussion points for a debate with persons who disbelieves that human life could have originated in Africa.

SP1.3 Students will create properly labeled 3D model or display of Ardi or Lucy

Unit 1: Vocabulary Mastery

Unit 1: Quiz

Unit 1: Test

Unit 1: Regents Prep

Unit 1: DBQ

Unit 1: Thematic Essay


















UNIT 2 DESCRIPTION: African Kingdoms and Civilizations

Before the African continent was invaded and colonized by Europeans, it was boasted to have populated towns, cities, and kingdoms with fully functional governments; cultural and education centers and well-structured societal systems.




By examining the work of historians and scholars, students will develop a pre-colonial understanding of what life was like on the African continent. Students will develop the context and skills needed to expand their knowledge base about African life by investigating the interactions that African people have shared with the “Old World” and by studying the development and interactions of social/cultural/political/economic/ religious systems in different regions of the African continent

Unit 2 will be investigated through a focus on the following NYS Standards for Social Studies theme:



World History use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of major ideas, eras, themes, developments, and turning points in world history and examine the broad sweep of history from a variety of perspectives.

  • Time, Continuity, and Change

    • How are the concepts of time and place vital to the understanding of history?

    • What defines a turning point?




Unit 2 Essential Question(s):

What to think about



NCSS, COMMON CORE STATE & NYS SOCIAL STUDIES STANDARDS

Content

What to teach



Resources/Learning Activities

How to teach & with what



Student Performance Expectations

What students should be able to do with mastery



EQ2.1 How were African societies organized?

EQ2.1A To what extent are terms such as “Far East” and “Middle East” a reflection of a European perspective on regions?

EQ2.2 What role does religion play in the organization of societies?

EQ2.2A What assumptions have different groups made regarding power, authority, governance,

and law across time and place?



EQ 2.3 In what ways did classical African civilizations contribute to the social, political and economic development of humankind?

2.3A What role did African kingdoms play in overland and maritime trade routes of the era?



EQ2.4 How do the movements of people and ideas (cultural diffusion) affect world history?

2.4A How did traditional art reflect the beliefs of African kingdoms?



EQ2.5 What social hierarchies were in place in African Kingdoms?


NYSS #2 K1 Key Idea 1:The study of world history requires an understanding of world cultures and civilizations, including an analysis of important ideas, social and cultural values, beliefs, and traditions. This study also examines the human condition and the connections and interactions of people across time and space and the ways different people view the same event or issue from a variety of perspectives.


C2.1. Major Kingdoms:

Abyssinia (Ethiopia,) Jolof-Senegal,Mossi (Burkina Faso), Benin (later Togo & Benin then Nigeria), Kilwa (Tanzania), Kush (Nubia), Kemet (Egypt), Axum, Meroe, Mali (Later Songhai)-Mansa Musa, Kanem (Kanem-Bornu to Chad), Angola, Congo, Benin, Senegambia, Zimbabwe. Ghana (Akan), Funj Alwa), Kongo, Bunyoroa, Lunda, Ankole, Rwanda

C2.1. Queens- Cleopatra, Sheba, Hatshepsut, Rweej

C2.1 Stateless Societies- Pastoral & Nomadic, Ibo, BaMubuti, Khoi-San, Masai, Nuer, and Kikuyu.

Dogon, Kru, Tiv, Ibo, BaMubuti, Khoi-San, Masai, Nuer, & Kikuyu Kemetic

C2.2 Mono & polytheism, African indigenous religious beliefs/worship practices animism, Islam(Sunni, Shite, Sufism) and Christianity

C2.2A Theocracies & Social Hierarchies

C2.2B Causes of decline.

C2.3 Economies

C2.3A Trading economies; Bantu migrations

C2.4 African Cultures- art, architecture, mathematics, astronomy, science, technology, roads and regional agriculture and sustenance.


Vocabulary – See unit 2 vocab. list. Create your own vocabulary activities.

Teach Study Skills: Provide students with an appropriate framework with which they can study two major kingdoms in depth.

Student Reading/Activities:

  • Ancient African Kingdoms PP

  • Read AAH 10-14

Great Sphinx photo (Egypt):

http://slic.njstatelib.org/slic_files/imported/NJ_Information/Digital_Collections/AAHCG/sphinx.pdf

Ancient Civilizations map:

http://slic.njstatelib.org/slic_files/imported/NJ_Information/Digital_Collections/AAHCG/africanEmpires.pdf

  • Stateless societies

(Youtube)

  • Read AAH: pg. 24-28

  • Activities on West African Empires: http://mali.pwnet.org/lessonplan/lessonplan_middle_high.htm

African Culture Activity

SP2.1 Make a PowerPoint presentation of one of African Kingdom and present in front of an audience.

SP2.1 Place Kingdoms in their correct geographic locations on a blank map.

SP2.1A Write a modern interpretation of an African scholar’s writing about how they viewed a particular geographic region.

SP2.2.


SP2.3 Create a timeline which demonstrates an understanding of the development and connectedness of African civilization and other civilizations and cultures over time.

SP2.4


African Kingdoms Multiple Choice

Unit 2: Vocabulary Mastery

Unit 2: Quiz

Unit 2: Test

Unit 2: Regents Prep

Unit 2: DBQ

Unit 2: Thematic Essay





C2.5 Freedom and Servitude

  • Systems of Slavery & forms of resistance

  • indentured servitude, compensated servitude

2.3A Map activities on African Imperialism http://www.ehow.com/list_6500677_high-maps-activities-african-imperialism.html

  • Article –Race and Slavery in the Middle East: http://www.rzuser.uni-heidelberg.de/~el6/presentations/pres_c1_african_americans_ws02_03/Slavery_in_Africa_prior_to_European_contact.htm

  • Overiew: http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/med/lewis1.asp
























Article & activities on “Religion in Africa” http://exploringafrica.matrix.msu.edu/students/curriculum/m14/activity2.php

  • This article is great for deeper understanding of slavery in Africa, specifically the Middle East

Student activities and other resources: http://www.rzuser.uni-heidelberg.de/~el6/presentations/pres_c1_african_americans_ws02_03/Slavery_in_Africa_prior_to_European_contact.htm

African Civilizations and the Spread of Islam

http://wps.ablongman.com/long_stearns_wcap_4/18/4647/1189812.cw/index.html


  • http://www.islamandafrica.com/index.html

Visit : Baobab Art Museum

  • Plan a visit to see the “Magnificent Africa” Exhibit

  • African Culture Activity

  • Ancient Africa writing systems:

http://www.blacklooks.org/2010/10/ancient-african-writing-systems/



Teacher Reading:

  • Introduction to African Civilization by John G, Jackson

  • The African Origins of Civilization: Myth or Reality by Cheikh Anta Diop

  • Nile Valley Contribution to Civilization By Anthony T. Browder

  • Destruction of Black Civilization by Chancellor Williams

  • Before the Mayflower by Leone Bennett Jr.

  • African American Folklore by Stephen Currie

  • Scholars on Ancient Africa: Wennofer, Kagemni, Sonchis, Khan-anup.










UNIT 3 DESCRIPTION: The African Diaspora

Although they made reside in different geographic regions, Africans are said to be living in the Diaspora because while they belong to one particular cultural, share a common ancestry to locales on the African continent.

Both voluntary and involuntary movement of African people throughout the Western Hemisphere and the World has created a “Diaspora” (dispersion of a people from their original homeland).


By comparing and contrasting different as cultural components, students should develop the skills necessary to identify and come to understand the development and connectedness of Africanism throughout the World. This investigation should include the characteristics, distributions, and migrations of African populations on the Earth’s surface. Students should also be prepared to compare and contrast the social, political, and economic dimensions of Afro- Caribbean, Afro-European cultures on the African Diaspora demonstrating that they understand the impact of cultural diffusion.


Unit 3 Essential Question(s):

What to think about



NCSS, COMMON CORE STATE & NYS SOCIAL STUDIES STANDARDS

Content

What to teach



Resources/Learning Activities

How to teach & with what



Student Performance Expectations

What students should be able to do with mastery



EQ3.1: What factors contributed to the creation of diverse cultures that have roots in Africa? What are some examples of such African traits?

EQ3.2 What impact did the dispersal of African people have on demographic trends in the Americas, Africa, and Europe?

3.2A How did life change as a result of this encounter?

EQ3.3 Where around the globe did African culture take hold?

3.3A How does it manifest itself?


  • Human beings, learn, modify, and adapt to their cultures. Their culture helps them comprehend and make sense of themselves as individuals and members of various groups.

  • Cultures predispose individuals to develop perspectives, make assumptions, create ideas, and behave in particular ways.

  • Cultures are similar in how they influence individuals but they differ in the specifics of their influence.

  • All cultures have systems of knowledge, values, traditions, and beliefs; yet the specifics of each may vary widely.

  • Each cultural system is also unique. Cultures and systems within cultures are dynamic, ever-changing, and highly influential on the thoughts and actions of those who belong to them. Learners should be able to engage independently in in-depth analysis of any cultural group or subgroup and in-depth comparison of any two or more cultural groups or subgroups.

  • They should be able to connect their comprehension of cultural groups to the realities of cultural diversity within multicultural societies and consider how culturally different groups can cooperate to enhance the public good.




C3.1 Language Patterns – Niger Congo, Patois, Geechee, Ceole, Gullah, Black English, Spanlish; slang

C3.2 Polyrhythmic music

C3.2A Exchange of food; disease; political ideologies

C3.3 European Africans- Moors and Jews

In England, Amsterdam, Russia, Africans and Native Americans, Caribbean Africans; Jamaicans, Puerto Ricans, Central and South American Africans, Canadian Africans


Vocabulary – See unit 3 vocab. list. Create your own vocabulary activities.

  • Languages and the Diaspora Article,

  • Ebonics Timeline

  • Article Caribbean Languages as a form of Resistance

  • On-Line Visit to Museum of the Africa Diaspora http://www.moadsf.org/salon/

  • http://www.pbs.org/wnet/black-in-latin-america/

Exploring Africa article w/questions: Africans in Great Britain

They Came Before Columbus, Ivan - Van Sertima

Open Letter to African Heads of State




SP3.1 Students prepare a 5-minute PowerPoint on a person in pop culture who has been “Americanized”, but has some roots in an African culture, Idris Alba or Seal for example.

SP 3.2 Students will design and or make an authentic replica of African instrument out of materials found in their environment.

Unit 3: Vocabulary Mastery

Unit 3: Quiz

Unit 3: Test

Unit 3: Regents Prep

Unit 3: DBQ

Unit 3: Thematic Essay










UNIT 4 DESCRIPTION: Invasion, Enslavement & European Colonization

As European countries grew more powerful, so did their desire to acquire human and natural resources from the African continent. Friendship, manipulation, religious zeal and outright aggression toward indigenous African people throughout the continent, led to forceful enculturation of people throughout the world.




By using primary and secondary sources, students should be able to analyze and evaluate conflicting viewpoints regarding European imperialism and its impact on the African continent.


Unit 4 Essential Question(s):

What to think about



NCSS, COMMON CORE STATE & NYS SOCIAL STUDIES STANDARDS

Content

What to teach



Resources/Learning Activities

How to teach & with what



Student Performance Expectations

What students should be able to do with mastery



EQ 4.1 What were the external and internal factors that led to invasion and enslavement of African People?

EQ 4.2 What role did world governments play in the African Holocaust?

4.2A What role did missionaries, traders, and internal strife play in the spread of slavery?

EQ 4.3 To what extent did the Atlantic Slave Trade impact the social, political, and economic conditions of African societies?

4.3A. What goods and services shall be produced and in what quantities?

4.3B. How shall goods and services be produced?

4.3C. For whom shall goods and services be produced?

EQ 4.4 In what ways did European colonization forever change the African continent?

4.4A In what ways was 1492 a turning point in global history?

4.4B What impact did mercantilism have on European colonies in Africa?



EQ4.5 What role did technology play in enslavement?

EQ4.6- What is the relationship between former colonies and the nations that once controlled them?

NYS Analyze complex aspects of production, distribution, and consumption, and evaluate the market forces and government policies that affect these aspects.


  1. Amistad

  2. Types of slavery (chattel, bondage, forced labor)

  3. Triangle Trade/Middle Passage

  4. Coveted Resources of South Africa by the Dutch




Vocabulary – See unit 4 vocab. list. Create your own vocabulary activities.



  • AAH

  • Amistad – Teacher selected video excerpts http://www.ovguide.com/amistad-9202a8c04000641f800000000023015e;



  • Scramble for Africa Station



  • Ch. 2; Sect 1, p 37-44

  • Lesson plan link: http://www.adprima.com/social20.htm

Cultural Diffusion

SP4.1 Students

SP4.2 Students will

Unit 4: Vocabulary Mastery

Unit 4: Quiz

Unit 4: Test

Unit 4: Regents Prep

Unit 4: DBQ

Unit 4: Thematic Essay










  • Roots, Alex Haley (video and text excerpts)

  • Copper Sun, Sharon Draper (text excerpts)

  • The Trans-Atlantic slave trade

  • Roots Excerpt;

  • Roots Clip and Roots Clip #2

Copper Sun Excerpt



























UNIT 5 DESCRIPTION: African & African Americans in the Colonies

The first generations of “African Americans” grew up during the Colonial Time period. As more Africans were shipped to the Americas, many more native born African American increased the population of Africans living a life of involuntary servitude. A very select number of African Americans were allowed to live their lives in freedom. The larger and wiser the Black population became, the more White Americans sought ways to justify the relegation of African American to less than human roles.



By investigating interdependent economies throughout the world over time and place, students should be able to trace the maritime trading routes that linked the African continent to the “New World” and led to continued aggression toward Blacks in the Diaspora.


Unit 5 Essential Question(s):

What to think about



NCSS, COMMON CORE STATE & NYS SOCIAL STUDIES STANDARDS

Content

What to teach



Resources/Learning Activities

How to teach & with what



Student Performance Expectations

What students should be able to do with mastery



EQ5.1: How was life/culture for Africans transformed into the life of an enslaved person?

EQ5.2: How did the institution of slavery fit within the American concept of democracy?




  1. Jamestown – indentured servants

Vocabulary – See unit 5 vocab. list. Create your own vocabulary activities.

  • HBAA, Vol - DVD, Blacks Arrive in Jamestown

SP5.1 Students

SP 5.2 Students will

Unit 5: Vocabulary Mastery

Unit 5: Quiz

Unit 5: Test

Unit 5: Regents Prep

Unit 5: DBQ

Unit 5: Thematic Essay







  1. Enslavement in Northern & Southern Colonies

  • Life Styles of Enslaved Africans

  • NJ Concessions and Agreement of 1664/1665

  • AAL

  • P. 70-80, “ Being Brought from Africa” & “To His Excellency General George Washington”, p.90/B








  1. Legislation-3/5 Compromise; NJ Abolition Act of 1804; Fugitive Slave Act 1850, Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854;









  1. Manumission, Emancipation, Proclamation and the 13th Amendment

  • Juneteenth






  • http://www.juneteenth.com/history.htm

  • JUNETEENTH








UNIT 6 DESCRIPTION: Resistance , Oppression, the Fight for Civil Rights & the Civil Rights Movement

Historically, oppressed peoples have had to fight; in many cases, to the death for basic human, civil and legal rights that were lawfully and unlawfully denied to them. African Americans found and maintained the strength, courage and fortitude to forge ahead in the battle for equality for themselves and their children.

Although Black Americans; legally free American citizens, the rights and freedoms guaranteed in the Bill of Rights, were not fully extended to African American citizens. “Separate but equal” remained the law of the land. Through civil disobedience and other forms of protest, the U.S. Constitution has been amended to further protect the rights of African American citizens. The battles were waged and as a result African-Americans now enjoy many freedoms denied to their ancestors.


This study involves learning about the important roles and contributions made by individuals and groups in the fight against American oppression.





















Unit 6 Essential Question(s):

What to think about



NCSS, COMMON CORE STATE & NYS SOCIAL STUDIES STANDARDS

Content

What to teach



Resources/Learning Activities

How to teach & with what



Student Performance Expectations

What students should be able to do with mastery



EQ6.1: What were the various resistance tactics created by oppressed Africans who were enslaved in North American and the Caribbean? What kind of impact did it have at the time and in the generations to follow?

EQ6.2: What were some of the challenges that African Americans faces as the war for equal right was being fought? Who were some of the unsung heroes of this era and what were their contributions?

EQ6.3: How is the African American heritage and successes celebrated in modern American? What are the modern day struggles for African Americans as the attempts is made to level the playing field in employment, education and housing?

EQ6.4: What strategies did Civil Rights Leaders take to overcome the adverse aspects of poverty, discrimination, racial profiling unequal or unjust law enforcement?





    1. Conflicts, warring, resistance, survival, rebellions and resolutions

  • Nat Turner Rebellion



  1. Pioneers & Forerunners- Harry Belafonte, Sidney Poitier, Bayard Rustin, John Henri Clarke, August Wilson



  1. Techniques - civil disobedience, non-violence (Mohandas Gandhi & Jawaharlal Nehru), protest marches, sit-ins

Major Events - March on Washington, Emmet Till; Montgomery Bus Boycott, Black Power Movement, Operation Facelift

Vocabulary – See unit 6 vocab. list. Create your own vocabulary activities.

  • AAL Sojourner Truth P. 93

  • P. 101 – 109, activities p. 110-111

  • Why Every High School Student Should Read The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass Denver 2010

  • P. 120-125

  • P. 150 – 153

  • 157-160, activities 160-161



  • AAL Excerpt from Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass…

  • AAL From Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl

  • AAL from Crusade for Justice

  • AAL The Song of Smoke; We Wear the Mask

SP6.1 Students

SP6.2 Students will

Unit 6: Vocabulary Mastery

Unit 6: Quiz

Unit 6: Test

Unit 6: Regents Prep

Unit 6: DBQ

Unit 6: Thematic Essay




    1. Resistance Songs/Spirituals



    1. . Pan Africanism – Marcus Garvey “Back to Africa” – Sierra Leone; Liberia, 1st Migration

    2. The American Colonization Society” and formation of Liberia.



    1. Purchasing Freedom

    2. Intellectual Giants- W.E.B. DuBois, Booker T. Washington



    1. McCarthyism & Blacklisting



    1. Congress of Racial Equality



    1. Brown v. Board of Education Topeka, Kansas – Eisenhower



    1. Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SLCC), Southern Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), National Association for the Advancement of Colored People(NAACP), Nation of Islam, CORE, Freedom Riders, Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party



    1. Individual Resistance- Muhammad Ali, Randall Robinson



    1. Legislation- Civil rights Act of 1964, 24th Amendment, Voting Rights of 1964



    1. Riots- Watts, Rochester, Detroit, Philadelphia, Newark, Harlem, Bedford-Stuyvesant, Patterson, Elizabeth, and Jersey City



    1. A. Social/Civic Action/Black Consciousness

  • AAL – Go Down Moses

  • Bob Marley’s Redemption Song

  • P. 113-117

  • Article:

  • http://www.rasta-man-vibration.com/marcus-garvey.html; Song: http://www.musicbanter.com/lyrics/Bob-Marley-Redemption-Song.html



  • Activity for article Caribbean Resistance.docx

  • Excerpt from The Black Mayflower, by Prince Massala Reffell and Student Activity

  • http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/african/afam002.html - link to the American Colonization Society



  • Background on STRANGE FRUIT

  • p. 162; 263-266

  • “A Prince Among Slaves – Abdul Rahman Ibrahima Sori”/p. 48-55



  • Article on African Caribbean Resistance African Caribbean Resistance Article



  • Strange Fruit

  • AAH – Section 3, “Colonization”

  • PBS Media/AAL from …the Life of Olaudah Equiano & http://school.discoveryeducation.com/schooladventures/slavery/equiano.html

AAH pg 541-549

  • Information selected from attaches powerpoints.

  • The Civil Rights Movement PowerPoint

  • Teaching Civil Rights

John Henrik Clarke - A Great and Mighty Walk

The Civil Rights Movement PowerPoint

Full Text MLK

AAH pg 567-572



  • AAH pg. 817-824, Baldwin-Wright Biographies.pdf

Baldwin-Wright Activity.docx




UNIT 7 DESCRIPTION: African American Involvement w/Wars and Conflict

African Americans held extraordinary roles in U.S. Military Services, protecting the freedom and rights for all Americans. Despite facing palpable racism and segregation within the military, their acts of bravery and courage could not go unnoticed. The color line could not hide the amazing victories won by all Black regiments in the U.S. military.






Unit 7 Essential Question(s):

What to think about



NCSS, COMMON CORE STATE & NYS SOCIAL STUDIES STANDARDS

Content

What to teach



Resources/Learning Activities

How to teach & with what



Student Performance Expectations

What students should be able to do with mastery



EQ7.1: What were the contributions of African Americans in military? What were the challenges that were faced as they were attempting to serve the United States?




  1. Revolutionary War

Vocabulary – See unit 7 vocab. list. Create your own vocabulary activities.

  • HBAA, Vol 1 – DVD - Crispus Attuck and the Black Patriots

SP7.1 Students

SP7.2 Students will

Unit 7: Vocabulary Mastery

Unit 7: Quiz

Unit 7: Test

Unit 7: Regents Prep

Unit 7: DBQ

Unit 7: Thematic Essay







  1. Civil War- Confiscation Act (1862); First South Carolina Volunteers; Fifty-Fourth Massachusetts Regiment (1863); Fort Pillow Massacre (1864); Negro Soldier Law (1865)

  • era9 Americans and War time Civil Rights






  1. World War I & World War II: Black First in military service- Army Air Corp: Tuskegee Airmen; Marines; Navy (USS Mason & PC 1264); Army (93rd Div. 24th & 25th Infantry; 92nd Div., 761st Tank Battalion, 369th Anti-Aircraft Artillery Regiment, 969th Field Artillery Battalion & 614th Tank Destroyer Battalion, 477th Bombardment Group, 332nd Fighter Group {99th, 100th, 301st& 302nd}, 99th Fighter Squadron), Dorie Miller, Leroy Seals










  1. Current Military Service: Vietnam &










  1. Korea, Desert Storm, Persian Gulf, Kuwait, Iraq, Afghanistan










UNIT 8 DESCRIPTION: Great Migrations

Pre WWI there were major migrations African American people from the South East to areas North and West. Many Blacks left in pursuit of economic opportunities, while others wanted desperately to escape the “Jim Crow” South and the continued brutal treatment and non-acceptance from Southern Whites.





By reviewing the impacts of industrialization on the America’s capitalist society, students should come to understand that urbanization, modernization, and population pressures are longstanding issues facing African-Americans all over the nation and that they are powerful agents of radical social change.


Unit 8 Essential Question(s):

What to think about



NCSS, COMMON CORE STATE & NYS SOCIAL STUDIES STANDARDS

Content

What to teach



Resources/Learning Activities

How to teach & with what



Student Performance Expectations

What students should be able to do with mastery



EQ8.1: What were the “push-pull” factors of African Americans from the South of the United States to the North and West ?

EQ8.2-To what extent did America moving from a cash crop economy to a diversified industrial economy impact the lives of African-Americans?





  1. Chicago, IL; Racine, Wisconsin Westward

  2. New York, NY, Rochester, NY

  3. From the Caribbean

Vocabulary – See unit 8 vocab. list. Create your own vocabulary activities.

  • AAH - Ch. 16, sect. 5

  • Great Migration Bibliography

Great Migration Lesson

Great Migration Continues (T. Wade)

Great Migration Internet Workshop

Lesson 6 African Migration

Jacob Lawrence - The Migration Series

Migration Thematic (T. Wade)

day 1 AF Amer migra

day 2 AF Amer migra

day 4 Great Migration

day 5 Great Migration



  • AAH – Ch. 16, sect 5

Internet article

P. 578; Caribbean Migration Website and History of International Migration ; Migration Activity http://www.inmotionaame.org/migrations/landing.cfm;jsessionid=f8302597071324448391870?migration=10&bhcp=1

http://www.let.leidenuniv.nl/history/migration/chapter52.html#1 ; Migration Activity


SP8.1 Students

SP8.2 Students will

Unit 8: Vocabulary Mastery

Unit 8: Quiz

Unit 8: Test

Unit 8: Regents Prep

Unit 8: DBQ

Unit 8: Thematic Essay




UNIT 9 DESCRIPTION: Segregation, Apartheid & Jim Crow

Despite the Emancipation Proclamation of 1863 and the passage of the 13th Amendment, some White Americans insisted on oppressing Blacks at every turn. They began to use creative measures to insure that “free” Blacks continued to feel oppressed. Legal and illegal oppression was used to Whether the system used was legal or not, the attempt to hold back Black using fear and control once again allowed for the demonstration of strength, courage and remaining steadfast in the fight for freedom and equality.







Unit 9 Essential Question(s):

What to think about



NCSS, COMMON CORE STATE & NYS SOCIAL STUDIES STANDARDS

Content

What to teach



Resources/Learning Activities

How to teach & with what



Student Performance Expectations

What students should be able to do with mastery



EQ9.1: How did U.S. sanctions help to dismantle South African Apartheid?




A. Apartheid in South Africa

B. Legislation & Black Laws

C. School Integration


Vocabulary – See unit 9 vocab. list. Create your own vocabulary activities.

  • Mark Mathabane Biography

Prentice Hall America Ch 16; sect 3

P. 226 - 237



  • AAL – “ The First Day”

SP9.1 Students

SP 9.2 Students will

Unit 9: Vocabulary Mastery

Unit 9: Quiz

Unit 9: Test

Unit 9: Regents Prep

Unit 9: DBQ

Unit 9: Thematic Essay





UNIT 10 DESCRIPTION: The Development of an African American Identity

Being “Black” in America meant a person who was enslaved and never to be a part of any social class system. However post-slavery times did lead to an “awakening” to freed enslaved persons to figure out their place in American society.






Unit 10 Essential Question(s):

What to think about



NCSS, COMMON CORE STATE & NYS SOCIAL STUDIES STANDARDS

Content

What to teach



Resources/Learning Activities

How to teach & with what



Student Performance Expectations

What students should be able to do with mastery



EQ10.1: Research has shown that some people think that the character or likability of a person of color determines if that person is trustworthy and likable. How has this mindset been developed and how easy or difficult is it to change?






  1. African Americans Reborn – Harlem Renaissance

Vocabulary – See unit 10 vocab. list. Create your own vocabulary activities.

  • AAL – The Works of Langston Hughes; Alan Locke

  • AAH – “The Harlem Renaissance”



  • AAL – How It Feels to be Colored, Zora Neal Hurston



  • Beloved by Toni Morrison



  • AAL – from We, Too, Sing America – Duke Ellington

  • p. 170 – 175; History of Black America, Pgm. 5

  • The Civil Rights Movement PowerPoint

  • Ch. 17; Sect. 4, p 606-615 Alan Locke-Harlem Activity

  • p. 179 – 186

Their Eyes Were Watching God

p. 217 - 220




SP10.1 Students prepare a 5-minute PowerPoint on a person in pop culture who has been “Americanized”, but has some roots in an African culture, Idris Alba or Seal for example.

SP 10.2 Students will design and or make an authentic replica of African instrument out of materials found in their environment.

Unit 10: Vocabulary Mastery

Unit 10: Quiz

Unit 10: Test

Unit 10: Regents Prep

Unit 10: DBQ

Unit 10: Thematic Essay





  1. Naming Rights-Africans, Colored Americans, Afro-Americans, Blacks or Negros

  2. Standards & Physical Characteristics, Genetics and Punnet squares;

  3. Negative Connotations For Blackness/Terminology



  1. Struggle continues

  • http://www.slaveryinamerica.org/history/hs_es_names.htm

  • Article on Varying Skin Tones

  • A Black American - Def Poetry  (sensitive language)

  • Article - African American vs. Black Debate

  • 9min Clip Dark Girls

  • The Skin I’m In

  • Kuumba Consultants

  • Kwanzaa: An everyday resource and instructional guide. – D. Anderson

  • Activities follow the article



  • Whole group discussion is needed, however caution the students about the language , the mature response and critical thinking is a must



  • Have student read the article and choose a side to debate. Depending on the size of the class, there could be two or three sets of debate teams. Be sure to spend time establishing what a “debate” is, what is looks like and the goal.

The Skin I'm In

Free at last






UNIT 11 DESCRIPTION: Modern Life for People of African Descent

African Americans currently reside on every level of the American social and economic ladder; from those listed on Fortune 500 to those living well below the poverty line. The united efforts of many grass root activists groups, Local, State, and National legislators African Americans are much more empowered to fight for their civil rights and liberties. Still there are many injustices left to overcome.






Unit 11 Essential Question(s):

What to think about



NCSS, COMMON CORE STATE & NYS SOCIAL STUDIES STANDARDS

Content

What to teach



Resources/Learning Activities

How to teach & with what



Student Performance Expectations

What students should be able to do with mastery



EQ11.1: How is the African American heritage and successes celebrated in modern American? What are the modern day struggles for African Americans as the attempts is made to level the playing field in employment, education and housing?

EQ11.2 To what extent is the Industrial Revolution still occurring in newly independent African Countries?

EQ11.3 How does European imperialism of the past influence the relations of African countries with their neighbors today?

11.3A What impact did European occupation have on African countries ie. Ethiopia?



EQ11.4 What role does a “hidden” caste system play in the lives of African-American people today?





  1. White Flight, Redlining, Gentrification, Predatory Lending, Credit Scores

  2. Black Wealth/ Black Banks

  3. Modern Black American Youth

  4. Political- Barack Obama

  5. Religious- Al Sharpton

  6. Women- Shirley Chisholm, Barbara Jordan

Vocabulary – See unit 11 vocab. list. Create your own vocabulary activities.

  • Al Qaeda in Mali article

  • AAL from, To A Young Jazz Musician P. 287 – 289

  • AAL Before Hip-Hop was Hip-Hop P. 294 – 303

  • AAL Study on Young Blacks P. 308-311; Activity on p. ACTIVITY

  • Movie: Last King of Scotland

  • Obama inauguration cartoon



SP11.1 Students

SP11.2 Students will

Unit 11: Vocabulary Mastery

Unit 11: Quiz

Unit 11: Test

Unit 11: Regents Prep

Unit 11: DBQ

Unit 11: Thematic Essay




UNIT 12 DECRIPTION: Historic Leaders of African Descent

The wondrous yet painful history of Africans in America has produced many heroes, leaders, and organizations which served as pioneers in leading change and unity for African Americans and people of color in other parts of the world.






Unit 12 Essential Question(s):

What to think about



NCSS, COMMON CORE STATE & NYS SOCIAL STUDIES STANDARDS

Content

What to teach



Resources/Learning Activities

How to teach & with what



Student Performance Expectations

What students should be able to do with mastery



EQ13: What were some of the founding principles for Black Organizations; and how would the motivation for historical African Americans who were determined to break through prejudiced barriers be described?




        1. African American “Breakthroughs”



        1. Inventors

        2. Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) & Fraternities & Sororities

        3. Emerging Black Organizations

Vocabulary – See unit 12 vocab. list. Create your own vocabulary activities.



  • AAH New Black Organizations

  • AAH pg 545 – 549, W.E.B. Debois and the “Talented Ten”; AAH pg. 541-545 Booker T. Washington



  • AAH pg. 587 “Writing Activity”

  • Black Organizations Power Point Team Project.docx




SP12.1 Students

SP12.2 Students will

Unit 12: Vocabulary Mastery

Unit 12: Quiz

Unit 12: Test

Unit 12: Regents Prep

Unit 12: DBQ

Unit 12: Thematic Essay




KEY:

CCSS – Common Core State Standards RH - Reading Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies 6–12 AAH – African-American History



NYSGG – New York State Global Geography AAL African American Literature

History of African-American People Page




Share with your friends:




The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2020
send message

    Main page