History and Social Science Standards of Learning Enhanced Scope and Sequence



Download 0.49 Mb.
Page1/16
Date20.04.2016
Size0.49 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   16






History and Social Science

Standards of Learning

Enhanced Scope

and Sequence


United States History

to 1877


Commonwealth of Virginia

Department of Education

Richmond, Virginia

2004

Copyright © 2004

by the

Virginia Department of Education



P.O. Box 2120

Richmond, Virginia 23218-2120

http://www.pen.k12.va.us/
All rights reserved. Reproduction of materials contained herein

for instructional purposes in Virginia classrooms is permitted.


Superintendent of Public Instruction

Jo Lynne DeMary


Assistant Superintendent for Instruction

Patricia I. Wright


Office of Elementary Instructional Services

Linda M. Poorbaugh, Director

Betsy S. Barton, Specialist, History and Social Science
Office of Middle Instructional Services

James C. Firebaugh, Director

Beverly M. Thurston, Coordinator, History and Social Science, International Education
Office of Secondary Instructional Services

Maureen B. Hijar, Director

Colleen C. Bryant, Specialist, History and Social Science
Edited, designed, and produced by the CTE Resource Center

Margaret L. Watson, Administrative Coordinator

Mary C. Grattan, Writer/Editor

Bruce B. Stevens

Richmond Medical Park Phone: 804-673-3778

2002 Bremo Road, Lower Level Fax: 804-673-3798

Richmond, Virginia 23226 Web site: http://CTEresource.org

The CTE Resource Center is a Virginia Department of Education grant project

administered by the Henrico County Public Schools.


NOTICE TO THE READER

In accordance with the requirements of the Civil Rights Act and other federal and state laws and regulations, this document has been reviewed to ensure that it does not reflect stereotypes based on sex, race, age, or national origin.

The Virginia Department of Education does not unlawfully discriminate on the basis of sex, race, age, color, religion, handicapping conditions, or national origin in employment or in its educational programs and activities.

The content contained in this document is supported in whole or in part by the U.S. Department of Education. However, the opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the U.S. Department of Education, and no official endorsement by the U.S. Department of Education should be inferred.


Introduction
The History and Social Science Standards of Learning Enhanced Scope and Sequence is a resource intended to help teachers align their classroom instruction with the History and Social Science Standards of Learning that were adopted by the Board of Education in March 2001. The History and Social Science Enhanced Scope and Sequence is organized by topics from the original Scope and Sequence document and includes the content of the Standards of Learning and the essential knowledge and skills from the Curriculum Framework. In addition, the Enhanced Scope and Sequence provides teachers with sample lesson plans that are aligned with the essential knowledge and skills in the Curriculum Framework.
School divisions and teachers can use the Enhanced Scope and Sequence as a resource for developing sound curricular and instructional programs. These materials are intended as examples of how the knowledge and skills might be presented to students in a sequence of lessons that has been aligned with the Standards of Learning. Teachers who use the Enhanced Scope and Sequence should correlate the essential knowledge and skills with available instructional resources as noted in the materials and determine the pacing of instruction as appropriate. This resource is not a complete curriculum and is neither required nor prescriptive, but it can be a useful instructional tool.
The Enhanced Scope and Sequence contains the following:

Units organized by topics from the original History and Social Science Scope and Sequence

Essential understandings, knowledge, and skills from the History and Social Science Standards of Learning Curriculum Framework

Related Standards of Learning

Sample lesson plans containing

Instructional activities

Sample assessment items

Additional activities, where noted

Sample resources


Acknowledgments



Loretta Hannum
Former Social Studies Coordinator for Williamsburg-James City County
Public Schools







Heather Scully
Williamsburg-James City County Public Schools








Joan Spence

Former President, Virginia Council on Economic Education










Amy Yaugo
Williamsburg-James City County Public Schools


































































































Organizing Topic

Geography Skills

Standard(s) of Learning

USI.1 The student will develop skills for historical and geographical analysis, including the ability to

a) identify and interpret primary and secondary source documents to increase understanding of events and life in United States history to 1877;

c) sequence events in United States history from pre-Columbian times to 1877;

f) analyze and interpret maps to explain relationships among landforms, water features, climatic characteristics, and historical events.
USI.2 The student will use maps, globes, photographs, pictures, and tables to

a) locate the seven continents;

b) locate and describe the location of the geographic regions of North America: Coastal Plain, Appalachian Mountains, Canadian Shield, Interior Lowlands, Great Plains, Rocky Mountains, Basin and Range, and Coastal Range;

c) locate and identify the water features important to the early history of the United States: Great Lakes, Mississippi River, Missouri River, Ohio River, Columbia River, Colorado River, Rio Grande, Atlantic Ocean, Pacific Ocean, and Gulf of Mexico.



Essential Understandings, Knowledge, and Skills

Correlation to

Instructional Materials

Skills (to be incorporated into instruction throughout the academic year)

Identify and interpret primary and secondary source documents to increase understanding of events and life in United States history.


Sequence events in United States history.
Analyze and interpret maps to explain relationships among landforms, water features, climatic characteristics, and historical events.
Content

Describe continents as large land masses surrounded by water.


Identify the seven continents:

North America

South America

Africa


Asia

Australia

Antarctica

Europe. (Explain that Europe is considered a continent even though it is not entirely surrounded by water. The land mass is frequently called Eurasia.)


Explain that geographic regions have distinctive characteristics.

Identify the geographic regions of North America and describe the following physical characteristics of each region:

Coastal Plain

Located along the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico

Broad lowland providing many excellent harbors

Appalachian Highlands

Located west of Coastal Plain, extending from eastern Canada to western Alabama; including the Piedmont

Old, eroded mountains (oldest mountain range in North America)

Canadian Shield

Wrapped around Hudson Bay in a horseshoe shape

Hills worn by erosion and hundreds of lakes carved by glaciers

Holds some of the oldest rock formations in North America

Interior Lowlands

Located west of the Appalachian Mountains and east of the Great Plains

Rolling flatlands with many rivers, broad river valleys, and grassy hills

Great Plains

Located west of Interior Lowlands and east of the Rocky Mountains

Flat land that gradually increases in elevation westward; grasslands

Rocky Mountains

Located west of the Great Plains and east of the Basin and Range

Rugged mountains stretching from Alaska almost to Mexico; high elevations

Contains the Continental Divide, which determines the directional flow of rivers

Basin and Range

Located west of Rocky Mountains and east of the Sierra Nevadas and the Cascades

Area of varying elevations containing isolated mountain ranges and Death Valley, the lowest point in North America

Coastal Range

Rugged mountains along the Pacific Coast that stretch from California to Canada

Contains fertile valleys.


Identify and locate on a map the following major bodies of water to which the United States has access:

Oceans


Atlantic, Pacific

Rivers


Mississippi, Missouri, Ohio, Columbia, Colorado, Rio Grande

Lakes


Great Lakes

Gulf


Gulf of Mexico.
Describe, using the information below, how bodies of water support interaction among regions, form borders, and create links to other areas:

Trade, transportation, and settlement

The location of the United States, with its Atlantic and Pacific coasts, has provided access to other areas of the world.

The Atlantic Ocean served as the highway for explorers, early settlers, and later immigrants.

The Ohio River was the gateway to the west.

Inland port cities grew in the Midwest along the Great Lakes.

The Mississippi and Missouri Rivers were the transportation arteries for farm and industrial products. They were links to ports and other parts of the world.

The Columbia River was explored by Lewis and Clark.

The Colorado River was explored by the Spanish.

The Rio Grande forms the border with Mexico.

The Pacific Ocean was an early exploration route.

The Gulf of Mexico provided the French and Spanish with exploration routes to Mexico and other parts of America.


Sample Resources

Below is an annotated list of Internet resources for this organizing topic. Copyright restrictions may exist for the material on some Web sites. Please note and abide by any such restrictions.



Education Place. Houghton Mifflin, Inc.


Share with your friends:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   16




The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2020
send message

    Main page