Gt differentiated Model Lesson



Download 34.57 Kb.
Date26.05.2016
Size34.57 Kb.


GT Differentiated Model Lesson

Grade Level: 5th

Subject Area(s):

__ Reading, Writing

__ Mathematics


__ Science

X Social Studies

TEKS/Student Expectations:

Students will create a series of journal entries chronicling several generations of a family between the settlement of Jamestown (1607) and (1776), the Declaration of Independence. Students will produce one journal entry for every generation of people. Therefore, they will include one journal entry for every 20 years for a total of nine entries. Entries should include the family's dependence on the land, economic choices, reasons to migrate or reasons to stay, and it also must include a decision about how they are going to adapt and change their lives.



  • Understand the connection between geography and settlement.

  • Describe economic motivations for settlement in the United States.

  • Explain how issues of power and control lead to conflict.

9 Weeks:1st

Essential Question(s):

How does geography and man’s dependence on it affect settlement?

What affects a group of people’s decision to settle a region?

How do various regions in the U.S. differ?



Assessment(s):

__ Pre-Assessment X Formative X Summative



GT Scope and Sequence Skills:

X Creative Thinking

X Critical Thinking

X Communication

X Research

Student Learning Styles:

X Auditory

__ Visual/Spatial

__ Kinesthetic

X Other: Written


Elements of Depth and Complexity:

X Language of the Discipline

X Details

X Patterns

__ Trends

__ Rules


X Ethical Considerations

__ Unanswered Questions



X Over Time

X Different Perspectives

X Big Ideas

Lessons and Activities

X Whole Class X Small Group X Independent Activity

PART ONE:

Whole Class: Ask students: How did geography affect settlement areas? As they answer, track thinking on chart paper. What reasons did people give for wanting to come to the new world? How did they decide if the time was right? How did they decide where to settle? What were some of the possible outcomes of their decisions? Students journal about life in a family that recently relocated from England to the New England area. Students can take the perspective of a child, adult, or biographer.

On Grade Level: Students will write their first journals:

  • Journal 1: What unanswered questions were there on the part of the colonists when deciding to come to the new world?

  • Journal 2: What factors did the colonists consider when deciding where the best place to live would be?

  • Journal 3: What ethics were involved in living as a new society once New England began to establish itself?

GT Level:

  • Journal 1: What unanswered questions were there on the part of the colonists when deciding to come to the new world, and how did that differ depending on your place in the family?

  • Journal 2: What factors did the colonists consider when deciding where the best place to live would be? Did it prove to be a good area after they had been there over a period of time?

  • Journal 3: What were the ethics involved in living as a new society once New England began to establish itself, and how does it compare to what life was like in England?

Whole Class: Students discuss opinions and findings. Make sure students are distinguishing fact from opinion. Students continue working on colonization journal entries. Remind students to complete journals in sequential order.

PART TWO:

Whole Class: Discuss the following topics: jobs and resources in New England, the first generation of Americans being born, and how immigration impacted the newly formed colonies.

On Grade Level:

  • Journal 4: Write about jobs and resources available to colonists and how jobs and trades changed as more and more people began to inhabit the new land.

  • Journal 5: As new generations of people were born, what was the impact on land and what was the impact on the economic stability of the colony?

  • Journal 6: What were effects of growth on the family and children?

GT Level:

  • Journal 4: Write about jobs and resources available to colonists and how jobs and trades changed as more and more people began to inhabit the new land. What effect did having more people move to the area have on trade and business. (For example, what was the effect on commerce?)

  • Journal 5: As new generations of people were born, what was the impact on land and what was the impact on economic stability of the colony?

  • Journal 6: What patterns did you notice in and among the families?

Whole Class: Redefine historical fiction. Students discuss fictional journal entries. Ask students: How have you ensured historical accuracy?

PART THREE:

Whole Class: Students discuss the revolutionary war and the point of view of each side.

On Grade Level:

  • Journal 7: What were the ethics involved in the revolutionary War? Whose side was your person on and why?

  • Journal 8: What were the effects of war on the family?

  • Journal 9: A nation is born. Describe what it is like to live in a new nation. Describe what you expect life to be like from this time forward.

GT Level:

  • Journal 7: What were the ethics involved in the revolutionary War? Whose side was your person on and why? Choose a side and defend why you were fighting for the right side.

  • Journal 8: What were the effects of war on a family and what happened within families where there were different points of view?

  • Journal 9: A nation is born. Describe what it is like to live in a new nation. Look ahead to the next generation, and describe what you think life will be like for them.

Whole Class: Discuss journal entries. The discussion should revolve around changes in the colonies over the course of time covered in the journals. Ask students: What were some of the highlights of living during these times?

Resources:

Regional travel brochure and regional newspaper

informational resources: internet, encyclopedias, library, etc.




Process Assessment

Teacher observes the following:



Process Observation - Frequency:

Student uses the language of the discipline.



Seldom/Never

Occasionally

Often

Consistently

Process Observation – Frequency:

Student refers to research texts and materials.



Seldom/Never

Occasionally

Often

Consistently

Process Observation – Quality of Creative Thinking

Student uses creativity throughout stages of the task.




Typical of peers

Fluent Thinker

Flexible Thinker

Unique/Original

Process Observation – Quality of Analytical Thinking

Student evaluates decisions.



Simplistic

Practical

Logical

Justifiable

Product Assessment

Score

Historical Accuracy

Required Elements

Organization

3

Historical information is accurate, detailed, and vividly describes decisions whether to stay or leave England.

Student includes more information than is required and an attempt is made to tie the writing together.

Each letter has a clear beginning, middle, and end. They are detailed and contain evidence of complex ideas.

2

Historical information is accurate and contains many details.


Student includes more information than is required.

Each letter has a clear beginning, middle, and end, and includes many details.

1

Historical information is accurate.

Student includes all information that is required.

Each letter has a clear beginning, middle, and end.





Advanced Academic Services

Austin Independent School District





Share with your friends:




The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2020
send message

    Main page