Grade 4: Module 2A: Unit 3: Lesson 5 Planning a Historical Fiction Narrative Based on Expert Trades



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Grade 4: Module 2A: Unit 3: Lesson 5

Planning a Historical Fiction Narrative Based on Expert Trades


Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on NYSP12 ELA CCLS)

I can develop the topic with facts, definitions, details, and quotations. (W.4.2b)

I can write narrative text about real or imagined experiences or events. (W.4.3)

I can organize events in an order that makes sense in my narrative. (W.4.3a)

I can choose evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. (W.4.9)



Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

  • I can write a historical fiction narrative set in Colonial America.

  • I can create a historically accurate narrative based on facts and details from my research.

  • I can use vocabulary from my research on colonial times to write historically accurate descriptions in my narrative.

  • I can organize a plot for my narrative using historically accurate events.

  • Narrative Four-Square graphic organizer

  • Wheelwright Narrative drafts



Agenda

Teaching Notes

  1. Opening

  1. Sharing Wheelwright Drafts (5 minutes)

  2. Review Learning Targets (5 minutes)

  1. Work Time

  1. Adding to the Rubric (10 minutes)

  2. Reviewing Research and Choosing Vocabulary (15 minutes)

  3. Planning Historical Fiction Narratives (20 minutes)

  1. Closing and Assessment

  1. Sharing/Debrief (5 minutes)

  1. Homework

  • To help students keep their writing organized, consider keeping a class accordion folder labeled with names or individual writing folders to keep graphic organizers, drafts, and feedback recording forms.

  • Students will have to manage and cite their research materials in this lesson. Consider making a checklist of research materials students will need in order to plan their narratives.

  • Make this checklist more “visual” by prominently posting examples of the graphic organizers and Note-catchers.

  • Note that as a part of their homework for this lesson, students create comic strips (a storyboard) of their narrative. Keep this playful and informal: The purpose is simply to get students to go through the sequence of events for their stories once more before drafting. Drawing will help them to better visualize for their written descriptions, too.




Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

historically accurate, descriptions, organize, plot

  • Historical Fiction Narrative Rubric anchor chart (from Lesson 2)

  • Performance Task prompt (from Lesson 2)

  • Steps for Planning and Drafting My Narrative anchor chart (from Lessons 3 and 4)

  • Writing folders (from Lesson 1; where students have been collecting their work)

  • Vocabulary notebooks (from Unit 1)

  • Colonial Trade Research Note-catchers (from Unit 2)

  • Narrative Four-Square graphic organizer (one new blank copy per student)

  • Comic strip homework (one per student)




Opening

Meeting Students’ Needs

A. Sharing Wheelwright Drafts (5 minutes)

  • Ask students to get out their Lesson 4 homework: “Write the final paragraph of the wheelwright story.” Tell them that now they should have a complete draft of a narrative for the wheelwright (the model introductory paragraph, the detail paragraph they wrote with a partner, another detail paragraph they wrote in class, and a concluding paragraph they wrote for homework). Ask students to find a new partner (not the one they worked with at the end of Lesson 4). Give directions:

    • Read your drafts to each other.

    • Compare: How are your drafts similar? Different?

    • Are your narratives historically accurate? How so?

    • How well are your narratives sequenced?

  • While students share their homework, circulate and listen to them reading. Pick out two to three samples that you consider on target to read aloud to students before collecting them.

  • Collect drafts and Narrative Four-Square graphic organizers for the wheelwright to use as a formative assessment.



B. Reviewing Learning Targets (5 minutes)

  • Review the following learning targets: “I can write a historical fiction narrative set in Colonial America,” and “I can create a historically accurate narrative based on facts and details from my research.”

  • Remind students that these are their goals for learning as they plan, write, and revise their narratives over the next two weeks. Tell them that they have practiced planning and drafting narratives using the wheelwright, and now they will be using their own expert trades. Tell them that today they will focus on creating a plan for their narratives based on their research.

  • Post the remaining learning targets: “I can use vocabulary from my research on colonial times to write historically accurate descriptions in my narrative,” and “I can organize a plot for my narrative using historically accurate events.” Again remind students they have been working with these targets while writing a practice narrative about the wheelwright.

  • Mark the key transition in this unit: “Today, you will apply what you have been learning as you plan your narratives about your OWN tradesman..




Work Time

Meeting Students’ Needs

A. Adding to the Rubric (10 minutes)

  • Ask students to think about the following question for a minute, then ask them to turn and share with the two people sitting closest to them:

  • “Based on these learning targets, what will you need to keep in mind as you plan?”

    • Our plans are based on our research and our imaginations.

    • We use choose words from our research to plan for our descriptions.

    • The events in our plans are in an order that makes sense.

  • Post the Historical Fiction Narrative Rubric anchor chart. Tell students that they have learned so much about writing historical fiction over the past few lessons. It’s time to add to the rubric.

  • Read the following learning targets in the rubric: “I can use vocabulary from my research on colonial times to write historically accurate descriptions in my narrative,” and “I can organize events in an order that makes sense in my narrative.” Discuss what Meets, Partially Meets, and Does Not Meet look like for each with the class and record on the anchor chart. (For example: For “I can use vocabulary from my research on colonial times to write historically accurate descriptions in my narrative,” the Meets column might say: “Includes at least four words from my research that are used to create historically accurate descriptions.”)

  • Capture students’ thinking, make suggestions to give the rubric appropriate rigor, and clear up misconceptions as you complete these parts of the rubric.

  • Explain to students that in the next lesson, when they write a draft of their narratives they will be assessed using only these completed parts of the rubric and they should keep this in mind as they write today. For example: “We have been building this rubric over the last several lessons, but it is not yet complete. We still have a lot to learn about writing narratives. Tomorrow you will be asked to write the first draft of your narrative as an assessment, but since we have been focused on historical accuracy of ideas, vocabulary, and organization of our story’s events, these will be the only things your drafts are assessed on. Keep this in mind as you plan today, so that you can do well on the assessment tomorrow.”

  • Having students write a response helps to ensure total participation with questioning. Students can write on a sticky note, index card, scrap paper, or a personal white board.

  • For students who need support in the planning process, consider one-on-one conferencing, pulling a small group, or having them work with a partner with a different trade.


Work Time (continued)

Meeting Students’ Needs

B. Reviewing Research and Choosing Vocabulary (15 minutes)

  • Display and review the Performance Task prompt. Remind students that they are now going to apply some of what they practiced together when writing about the wheelwright. Post the Steps for Planning and Drafting My Narrative anchor chart from Lessons 3 and 4. Review the steps with students and explain that today they will work on the planning steps, and tomorrow they will complete the drafting steps.

  • Help students organize their materials. Ask them to get out their writing folders (in which they have been collecting their work in the unit so far). Tell students that the main documents they will need will be their vocabulary notebooks (from Unit 1) and the Colonial Trade Research Note-catchers (from Unit 2). Tell students that they may use any research in their folders, but you would like them to place these documents on the tops of their desks. Give students a few minutes to organize their materials.

  • Distribute blank Narrative Four-Square graphic organizer. Ask them to first read through their research to collect vocabulary words they may use in their writing. Tell them to pay special attention to the vocabulary on their Colonial Trade Research Note-catchers. Give students 5 minutes to record vocabulary words. Circulate and support students in capturing words unique to their particular trade.

  • Next ask students to review the graphic organizer and think about what information they may need to review from their notes to help them plan a historically accurate narrative. Have them turn to a partner and share their next steps. You may consider giving them a sentence frame such as: “I need to write about __________, so I will look in my research for ___________.” You could also provide students with a model for this: “I need to write about how my character makes wheels, so I will look in my research for information about a wheelwright’s skills and tools.” Circulate and listen for students who may need additional support when planning their narratives.



C. Planning Historical Fiction Narratives (20 minutes)

  • Once students have shared their next step with a partner, tell them that they will have the next 20 minutes to plan their narratives. Tell them that you will be available to confer with them and support their planning.

  • Direct their attention to the planning steps on the Steps for Planning and Drafting My Narrative anchor chart. Remind them to follow these steps as they plan.






Closing and Assessment

Meeting Students’ Needs

A. Sharing and Debrief (5 minutes)

  • Gather students to share their work. Tell them that in a moment, they will use their plans to try to tell their story orally to a partner. Tell them this is a bit different than just reading their plans. Explain that you would like for them to tell their partner a shorter version of the story they think they will write tomorrow. Telling their story is one good way to rehearse what they want to actually write.

  • Draw their attention to the Historical Fiction Narrative Rubric anchor chart and explain that after they are finished telling their story, their partner should give them one “glow” and one “grow” based on the completed criteria on the anchor chart. Explain that a “glow” is something they think their partners did well from the rubric and a “grow” is something they need to work on. Consider giving students an example based on the wheelwright: “My glow for you is: I like how you used lots of historically accurate information about what the wheelwright did. My grow for you is: You might think about the order of events at the end of your story, because I found it a little confusing.”

  • Remind students that they have given critique and feedback before and that it should be kind, helpful, and specific.

  • Ask students to begin sharing their narrative orally. Circulate and listen to students as they give feedback. Use this as a formative assessment for Lesson 7 (when students will engage in a formal critique and feedback session).

  • Distribute the comic strip homework to students.

  • Oral rehearsal serves as a strong scaffold for written language. Such oral rehearsal is helpful for all students, but particularly for ELLs.

Homework

Meeting Students’ Needs

    Create a short comic strip based on the plans for your story by drawing a picture for each section of your Narrative Four-Square graphic organizer. Add a sentence describing each picture at the bottom. Do not worry about how beautiful your pictures are: The purpose is just to visualize the sequence of events that you want to write about.



Note: Students will need to have their Narrative Four-Square graphic organizers for the next lesson, the mid-unit assessment. If you are worried about these plans coming back to school after homework, you may consider collecting the graphic organizers and asking students to complete the homework from memory.




Grade 4: Module 2A: Unit 3: Lesson 5

Supporting Materials




Narrative Four- Square Graphic Organizer


Name:

Date:




Introductory Paragraph

Detail Paragraph 1

Introducing the character, setting, and major event (rising action):
Details:

  • Who is the character?




  • When is it set?



  • Where is it set?



  • What is happening?



What problem arises?

Details:


















Vocabulary from my research to be used:





Narrative Four- Square Graphic Organizer


Detail Paragraph 2

Conclusion Paragraph

How does my character help solve the problem?

Details:



















What is the result of the character’s actions?

How does the story end?



My Sources: List any research you used in planning your narrative.




Comic Strip Homework
Directions:

Create a comic strip based on your plans for your historical fiction narrative. Your strip should have an illustration and a caption for each part of your story.


The purpose of your comic strip is just to help you keep thinking about the sequence of events for your narrative before you start your draft. Drawing pictures in your comic also will help you to visualize what you want to describe in your writing.













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Exempt third-party content is indicated by the footer: © (name of copyright holder). Used by permission and not subject to Creative Commons license.






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