Government Lesson Plan Nick Kukarola



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Government Lesson Plan

Nick Kukarola


Lesson Topic: Structure of the United States Government

Grade: 10

Date: November 13, 2010


REFLECTION – This should be completed by the teacher education candidate upon completion of the lesson and discussed with cooperating teacher.

Goal(s): Perceptual and Memory


Did the goals of this lesson fit appropriately into the body of work being studied? How do you know?

State/Local Standards:





Materials: The teacher will need an PowerPoint to assist the lecture. The students will need a notebook, writing utensil, and textbook to follow along with the lecture. The teacher will need a KWL sheet.





Objective(s):

Students will analyze how the American Constitution has evolved through post-reconstruction amendments and Supreme Court decisions.

Students will analyze how geographic processes have affected the growth and development of the American nation both domestically and internationally.


Did the students learn the objective(s) you intended? How do you know?

Introduction:

Transition/Focus Attention: The teacher will explain what he/she will be lecturing on for the day and then use the KWL chart to find out what the students already know about the topic and what they want to know. Using this will help the teacher focus on the points in which the students know the least.

Motivation: The teacher will announce that at the end of the lecture there will be a graded worksheet. This will motivate the students to take notes and pay attention during the lecture.

Set Behavior Expectations: Explain to the students what you will expect from them during the lecture and explain the consequences for not behaving or not participating.

Set Purpose: The purpose of this lesson is for the students to understand and be able to demonstrate their knowledge of the structure of our government.


How effective was your introduction in stimulating interest?

Strategy and Grouping Used: The teacher will use the KWL chart in order to evaluate the student’s knowledge before and after the lesson. There will be no groups for this activity.





Procedure/Learning Activities/Adaptations:

  1. The teacher will begin by introducing the topic and explain the KWL chart to the students. The students will then fill out the first two sections of the form and hand the form back to the teacher.



  1. The teacher will then lecture on the structure of the U.S. Government. The teacher may use the web of the government to go along with the material from the text; this may be used on an overhead. During the lecture the students will be expected to take notes using the Fill in notes provided by the teacher



  1. When the lecture is over the students will be given the KWL chart back to fill out the last section on what they learned from the lecture. When they are finished they will hand it back to the teacher and pick up a worksheet that will cover the material from the lecture and from the coinciding chapter. The worksheet will be completed for homework.




Anticipated Time

5-10 minutes

20-30 minutes

10 minutes

Would you modify/change the sequence of learning and time allocation for activities if you were to re-teach the lesson? Would you change any of the activities? What changes would you make?

How effective were your adaptations?


Closure/Checking for Understanding: When all of the students are finished the teacher will ask if there are any questions over the material or on the homework. After the class is over the teacher will read over the KWL charts to see if the students understood the information. The teacher could then identify the students who are not grasping the material and offer additional assistance to the students who are struggling. If necessary the teacher may have to review the lesson again if the KWL charts show the need to do so.


What information did you gain by checking for understanding during closure?



Cultural Diversity

Lesson Plan

Nick Kukarola

Lesson Topic: Cultural Diversity Date: November 11, 2010

Level: 10th Grade Social Studies


REFLECTION – This should be completed by the teacher education candidate upon completion of the lesson and discussed with cooperating teacher.

Goal(s):

By the end of the lesson the students will be able to understand how our world is changing and becoming more diverse each day. They will be able to discuss why this is happening and give examples of everyday events that show this happening. After watching the film the students will see how our world is transitioning into a hostile environment and how we must adapt to the new diversity.


Did the goals of this lesson fit appropriately into the body of work being studied? How do you know?

State/Local Standards:

K-12 Social Studies Benchmarks (from the Ohio Department of Education)

A. A. Explain connections between the ideas of the Enlightenment and changes in the relationships between citizens and their

governments.
B. Explain the social, political and economic effects of industrialization.
C. Analyze the reasons that countries gained control of territory through imperialism and the impact on people living in the

territory that was controlled.
D. Connect developments related to World War I with the onset of World War II.
E. Analyze connections between World War II, the Cold War and contemporary conflicts.
F. Identify major historical patterns in the domestic affairs of the United States during the 20th century and explain their

significance.
A. Analyze the influence of different cultural perspectives on the actions of groups.

B. Analyze the consequences of oppression, discrimination and conflict between cultures.

C. Analyze the ways that contacts between people of different cultures result in exchanges of cultural practices.






Materials:

Handout on” White Privilege”, film “Crash”, current event articles on the subject





Objective(s):

Thru watching the film and reading the handouts the students should be stimulated into discussion on the topic. The students should be able to engage into the discussion and give examples of how this affects their lives. They should also complete the essay on their opinion of the topic and how our world is changing in the post 9/11 world.


Did the students learn the objective(s) you intended? How do you know?

Introduction:

The teacher will address the students and explain that we will be watching the film “Crash” and we will be discussing how our world is changing and has changed since 9/11. The teacher will have already been given permission to watch the film and will have already sent out permission slips to the parents.


How effective was your introduction in stimulating interest?

Strategy and Grouping Used:

Concept Attainment:

The teacher will teach the concept of cultural diversity to the students and through watching the movie and reading the handout the students will be stimulated to think critically and respond to the questions given.

Inquiry:

At random points in the movie the teacher will stop the film and ask the students who have not seen the film to tell what they think is going to happen in the movie. This will help the students form questions and use their problem solving skills.

Synectics:

The teacher will ask the students to imagine if they were in the same situations as in the film and then ask the students what they would have done in the situation. This will foster creative thinking. Creative thinking will also we fostered and assessed thru the essay at the end of the lesson.

Oral Discussion:

This strategy will be used to discuss the student’s feelings on the film. It will also be used to discuss the current situation in the post 9/11 world.





Procedure/Learning Activities/Adaptations:

  1. The teacher will explain to the students that they will be watching the film crash. The teacher will split the room into two sides. One side that has seen the movie before and the other side for the first timers. This will be used for questioning later.



  1. The students will watch the film “Crash” and at key points through out the movie the teacher will stop the film and ask the students what they think will happen next in the film. This will initiate a short discussion. The film will then be resumed.



  1. After the film is finished the teacher will initiate a discussion on the film. The teacher will ask the students what they thought. What they thought was the most important quote? They will also be asked to describe the film using one word. The teacher will then list the words on the board. This will allow the students to summarize the movie.



  1. The class will then read the handout on “White Privilege” aloud in class. Another discussion will be initiated and the teacher will once again ask the students several questions pertaining to the topic. Such as do you experience this in our school? Do you think that it is a problem and why?



  1. When the discussions are finished the teacher will explain that the students will complete a one page essay on how the post 9/11 world is affecting them. The teacher will use this as an assessment of the lesson along with the student’s participation in the discussions.




Anticipated Time


Would you modify/change the sequence of learning and time allocation for activities if you were to re-teach the lesson? Would you change any of the activities? What changes would you make?

How effective were your adaptations?


Closure/Checking for Understanding:

After the discussions come to a close the teacher will explain that the students will be completing a one page essay on how the post 9/11 world is affecting them. The teacher will create a rubric to grade the essay paper but it will be largely based on opinion. A large portion of the assessment will occur during the discussion portion of the class, where the teacher will track the student’s responses and participation in the discussion. It will be explained before hand to the students that the discussions will count towards their grades. This will encourage the student’s responses.


What information did you gain by checking for understanding during closure?



Debate Lesson Plan

Nick Kukarola


Lesson Topic: Connections between global conflicts

Grade: 10

Date: November 13, 2010


REFLECTION – This should be completed by the teacher education candidate upon completion of the lesson and discussed with cooperating teacher.

Materials: The teacher will need a list of discussion and debate questions. On the given topic.


Did the goals of this lesson fit appropriately into the body of work being studied? How do you know?

Objective(s): Students will analyze the connections between past global conflicts such as WWI, WWII, and the Cold War with contemporary conflicts.





Introduction:

Transition/Focus Attention: The teacher will split the class into two sides and explain the debate process.

Motivation: The teacher will announce that the students will be graded on participation in the debate.

Set Behavior Expectations: Explain to the students what you will expect from them during the debate and explain the consequences for not behaving or not participating.

Set Purpose: The purpose of this lesson is for the students to understand and be able to demonstrate their knowledge of American conflicts.





Strategy and Grouping Used: The teacher will set the students in random groups.


Did the students learn the objective(s) you intended? How do you know?

Procedure/Learning Activities/Adaptations:

  1. The teacher will begin by introducing the topic and explain the debate to the class.



  1. The teacher will then pose an introductory question to the class to begin the debate. Each side will have two minutes to discuss with their group their response and then will have two minutes to deliver their response. Each side will alternate, with the chance to rebut the other side’s argument.

  2. The teacher will pose a new question at the end of each round until the class period is over.




How effective was your introduction in stimulating interest?

Closure/Checking for Understanding: With five minutes remaining the students will get out a half sheet of paper and write down who which side they think won the debate and what the three main points of that sides argument was.







Jeopardy Lesson Plan

Mr. Kukarola


Lesson Topic: WWI Jeopardy

Date: November 12, 2010

Grade Level: 10th


REFLECTION – This should be completed by the teacher education candidate upon completion of the lesson and discussed with cooperating teacher.

Goal(s): (Circle those applicable.)

Motor Perceptual Literacy Memory Problem Solving





State/Local Standards:
Analyze the impact of industrialization and the modern corporation in the United States on economic and political

practices with emphasis on:


a. Laissez-faire policies

b. Monopolies

c. Standard of living
Analyze the major political, economic and social

developments of the 1920s including:


f. Stock market speculation and the stock market crash

of



Did the students achieve the outcome(s) specified in the state/local standards? How do you know?

Materials: Question cards, Magnetic Point cards, Scoreboard

Teacher Resources: The Questions will be derived from the material in the lectures which comes mainly from the text covering the 1929 Stock Market Crash. The material will also come from the handouts given throughout the course.





Objective(s):

By the end of the lesson, the students will:

Summarize the critical problems threatening the American Economy in the late 1920’s. Describe the causes of the stock market crash.
Students will identify major historical patterns in the domestic

(political, economic, and social) affairs of the U.S. during the late 19th



century and through the 20th century and explain their significance.

Students will demonstrate an understanding of how the U.S.



economy operates in relation to market demands and the actions of

government and compare this with differing economic systems.


Did the students learn the objective(s) you intended? How do you know?

Introduction: Today we will be playing history Jeopardy in order to review the material on the 1929 Stock Market Crash. You may take notes on the questions and answers and use them to study for the test on this unit.

Transition/Focus Attention: Explain to the students that we will be reviewing for the test that will follow and in order to review we will play history Jeopardy. Explain that the material from the game will be on the test and that notes may be taken to help study from. By taking notes this will allow the students who relate with linguistic intelligence a chance to learn the material and make them feel more comfortable in the knowledge they have acquired.

Motivation: The motivation used is that the winning team will receive five bonus points to be used on the test. This will easily motivate the students to learn the material and win the game.

Set Behavior Expectations: During the game the teacher expects the students to work together as a group, however keep in mind that we are still in a classroom. Any student who yells out during the game, their team will lose 100 pts.

Set Purpose: The purpose of this game is to review for the test that will follow. This will give the students a chance to review the material and ask questions at the end of the game in order to fully prepare them for the test. All the material used in the game will come directly from the lectures and the handouts. Also all the material used in the game will be present on the test.


How effective was your transition and introduction at the beginning of the lesson/activity?

Strategy and Grouping Used:

In order to play Jeopardy teams must be formed. To do this, the teacher will have the students count off by threes. This will form three teams of ten. The teams will sit together.

Group Size: There are 30 students in the class so we will have three groups of ten.





Procedure/Learning Activities/Adaptations:

1. Before the class enters the magnetic point cards will already be placed on the board in the same order as real Jeopardy. The question cards will be laid out and the desks will be arranged into teams of ten.

2. Explain to the students that we will be playing History Jeopardy in order to review for the upcoming test. Then the teacher will explain the following rules for the game:

There will be four categories with four questions for each category worth, 100, 200, 300 and 400 points.

The team that answers correctly will pick the next category and point value.

If you miss the question you will lose the given amount of points.

3. Explain that there will be three teams of ten students, and each team will have a spokesperson who will buzz (raise your hand) in for their respected team, and also be the only one allowed to speak the answer. If another teammate other than the spokesperson answers the question, the team will lose 100 points.

4. Have the students number off by three’s and then get into their prospective group. Also have the teams pick their spokesperson. This will cover the Interpersonal Intelligence because the students will be in a group setting and have to work together as a team to achieve a goal.

5. Read an easy opening question and the first team to answer correctly will pick the first category. Then the game will begin where the team that answers correctly will pick the category. The teacher will read the chosen question aloud, and the teams will confer amongst themselves. When the team thinks they have the correct answer, the spokesperson will raise their hand. The first hand to go up will be the team called upon. If the answer is correct, the points will be awarded to that team. If the answer is not correct the teacher will call on the second fastest team for their answer. The points will be tallied by the teacher. This will cover the logical intelligence because it gives the students a chance to use reasoning, and the facts that they previously learned to give a logical, well thought out answer. This will also cover the verbal/ linguistic intelligence because the students are speaking and listening to each other and the spokesperson is verbalizing the answer.

6. When all of the categories are gone and all the points tallied, the final category will be announced and the teams must right down their wager. Once the wagers are collected by the teacher, the final question will be asked and the teams will write down their responses.

7. The answers will be collected and then read aloud to the class. The team with the most points after the final question will be awarded the five bonus points to be used on the test.

6. The teacher will then ask if anyone has any questions for the test, or if there are any comments.

Anticipated Time

3 minutes

3 minutes

1 minute

3 minutes

30 minutes

5 Minutes

3 minutes

3-5 minutes

Would you modify/change the sequence of learning and time allocation for activities if you were to re-teach the lesson/activity?

Would you change any of the activities?

What changes would you make?

How effective were your adaptations?

Closure/Checking for Understanding/Assessment:

At the end of the game the teacher will ask the students if they have any questions concerning the material or the test. After that the teacher will explain the format of the test and ask for any final questions. After all questions are asked the class will be dismissed. The teacher’s assessment of the class will come by how well the students answer the questions, and take notes on the material.


How effective were your closure and transition at the end of the lesson/activity?

A3: MATERIALS ARE LISTED IN EACH LESSON PLAN UNDER THE MATERIALS SECTION.

A4: Physical Materials
Computer, Projector, DVD Player, SmartBoard

A5:
Government Powerpoint Attached


Crash Questions Attached
Debate ?’s and groups Attached
Jeopardy Software Attached
Assessment Attached


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