Get rid of debates maybe? Add Jqa, mvb, and Tyler Add reading on finney and reform Maybe have students do reading but not do notes? Clean up Jackson lecture: make it all inclusive or tease it out Maybe add a day for women dbq or 2



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AP U.S. History- Meyers Name_________________________________________
Get rid of debates maybe?

Add JQA, MVB, and Tyler

Add reading on finney and reform

Maybe have students do reading but not do notes?

Clean up Jackson lecture: make it all inclusive or tease it out

Maybe add a day for women DBQ or 2nd GA dbq and have students analyze the student samples

Force students to grapple with jacksonian themes in various topics studied

Connections b/t jacksonian democracy, 2nd GA and reform movements?

Maybe add a second day for reform? More time on education and temperance


Unit 5: The Age of Jackson
Essential Questions
1. Understand the differences and similarities between Jeffersonian and Jacksonian Democracy.

2. Trace the development of political parties and their relationship to democratic change. At what point is the notion of an opposition party accepted by Americans?

3. How do we characterize the Jacksonians? What were their attitudes about democracy, equality, and opportunity?

4. How do we characterize Jackson? Old hickory or King Andrew? Democrat or autocrat? Conservative or liberal? Old republican or liberal capitalist?

5. On what issues was Jackson a nationalist? On what issues was he a friend of states’ rights?

6. What is the nature of the American character? Are we rugged individuals, money hungry materialists, or a society struggling to perfect itself in a quest for spiritual fulfillment?

7. What were the major reform movements of this period, and how did they relate to political developments?

8. What was the relationship between the cultural changes taking place and Jacksonian democracy?

9. What happened to the role and status of women in American society during this era? What forces were at work to maintain their roles and status? What forces were at work to change their roles and status?

Chapter 10 Study Guide
291-99

hotels meaning of “democracy” “popular sovereignty”

“self-made man” Martin Van Buren nominating conventions

“money-power” vs. “rabble rousers’ Workingmen’s Parties Thomas Skidmore

Philadelphia union activity social class distinctions romanticism in art / lit

William Mount George Caleb Bingham Brahmin poets

Ralph Waldo Emerson Nathaniel Hawthorne Herman Melville

Thomas Cole Asher Durand Edgar Allen Poe

John Quincy Adams the “corrupt bargain” tariff of abominations
312-313

political gatherings at the “husting” elbow rubbing the stump speech


301-304

1828 Election Rachel Jackson “the spoils system’

the Peggy Eaton affair the Cherokee Indian Removal Act

Worcester v. Georgia “Trail of Tears”

304-309

John Calhoun and nullification Jefferson Day Dinner South Carolina nullification the Force Bill Henry Clay - Tariff of 1833 “the Bank War”

Nicholas Biddle the “Kitchen Cabinet’ bank recharter attempt in 1832

Jackson’s veto of the recharter the election of 1832 removal of deposits to “pet banks”

Roger Taney
309-311, 314-316

Whigs Clay and Daniel Webster “King Andrew”

Anti-Masonic Party “Loco-Focos” the “specie circular”

the panic of 1837 Martin Van Buren the “independent sub-treasury”

election of 1840 William Henry Harrison “Tippecanoe and Tyler too!”

“log cabins and hard cider” the second two party system positions of Whigs and Democrats

demographic make-up of each party Alexis de Tocqueville Tocqueville’s analysis of “democracy in America”


Chapter 11 Study Guide
Charles Finney Second Great Awakening Peter Cartwright

Lyman Beecher Unitarians American Bible Society

American Temperance Society changes in husband-wife relationships

Cult of True Womanhood cult of domesticity sisterhood/sorority

changing conceptions of childhood public school movement Horace Mann

McGuffey’s reader prison reform Dorothea Dix

American Colonization Society William Lloyd Garrison The Liberator

American Anti-Slavery Society Theodore Dwight Weld

Elijah Lovejoy Frederick Douglas Louis and Arthur Tappan

The Liberty Party Sarah and Angelina Grimke Lucretia Mott

Elizabeth Cady Stanton Seneca Falls - 1848 Declaration of Sentiments

Robert Owen - New Harmony Charles Fourier - “phalanxes” the Shakers

Oneida Community John Humphrey Noyes Transcendentalism

Ralph Waldo Emerson Brook Farm Nathaniel Hawthorne

Henry David Thoreau Walden Sylvester Graham

Amelia Bloomer



Syllabus
You each will be assigned one of five debate topics to be debated in a “fishbowl” during class. Each of you will write a one to two page position paper arguing your side of the debate. THE PAPERS WILL BE DUE THE DAY AFTER THE DEBATE. Use information from the textbook, handouts, and other scholarly resources available to you in order to outline as many arguments for your side as possible. This writing assignment will replace the standard essay on the exam. The exam will consist of 30 multiple choice and 5 identifications.


Monday, 10-24

Unit 4 “Exam”

Go over exam

Introduce Unit 5


Text 291-299, 312-313

“In what ways and to what extent did the United States become more democratic during the 1820s and 1830s?”



Tuesday, 10-25

Jackson Introductory Video

Text 301-304

Handout: Indian Removal

Be prepared for Indian Removal debate!


Wednesday, 10-26

Democracy in the 1820’s-1830’s, Indian Removal

Debate: Should the Indians East of the Mississippi be moved West of the Mississippi?



Text 304-309

Handouts: Calhoun’s Fort Hill Address, Jackson on Nullification and the Bank, House Ways / Means on the Bank



Thursday, 10-27

Tariff, Nullification, and the Bank of the United States

Debate: Did South Carolina have the right to nullify the tariff law?

Debate: Should Jackson veto the recharter of the Bank of the United States?


Text 309-311, 314-316

Friday, 10-28

The Jacksonian Presidency

Debate: Was Jackson a great president?



Text 321-327

Handout: Reverend Finney on Reform



Monday, 10-31

The Second Great Awakening and Reform Movements

Text 330-338

Handout: Webster’s Catechism and McGuffy’s Reader, William Lloyd Garrison and the Boston Mob



Tuesday, 11-1

Reform Movements

Debate: Should Congress disallow petitions or debate related to the abolition of slavery?



Text 327-330, 338

Handout: The Cult of True Womanhood



Wednesday, 11-2

Women’s Rights

Debate: The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.



Text 338-344

Handout: Transcendentalist Poetry by Emerson



Thursday, 11-3

Exam





Sign-Up for Debate Leaders
Should the Indians East of the Mississippi be moved West of the Mississippi?
Yes No

1. 1.
2. 2.



Did South Carolina have the right to nullify the tariff law?
Yes No

1. 1.
2. 2.


Should Jackson veto the recharter of the Bank of the United States?
Yes No

1. 1.
2. 2.


Was Jackson a great president?
Yes No

1. 1.
2. 2.


Should Congress disallow petitions or debate related to the abolition of slavery?
Yes No

1. 1.
2. 2.


The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.
Yes No

1. 1.
2. 2.


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