General Sherman to President Lincoln December 22nd, 1864 General William Tecumseh Sherman



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General Sherman to President Lincoln

December 22nd, 1864
General William Tecumseh Sherman

The following is a telegram sent by General Sherman to President Lincoln concerning the progress of Sherman's 'March to the Sea.'  The success of this campaign helped clinch the 1864 election for Lincoln. 

SAVANNAH, GA., December 22, 1864


(Via Fort Monroe 6.45 p.m. 25th)

His Excellency President LINCOLN:

I beg to present you, as a Christmas gift, the city of Savannah, with 150 heavy guns and plenty of ammunition, and also about 25,000 bales of cotton.

W.T. Sherman,


Major General.

sherman

http://www.civilwar.org/education/history/primarysources/general-sherman-to-president.html



William T. Sherman to Henry W. Halleck

December 24, 1864
William T. Sherman


The following is a letter from William T. Sherman to Henry Halleck concerning the destruction in Georgia and the plan to move to South Carolina.

Headquarters  Military Division of the Mississippi,


In the Field, Savannah, December 24, 1864

Major-General H. W. Halleck,


Chief-of-Staff,
Washington, D.C.

General:

I had the pleasure of receiving your two letters of the 16th and 18th instant to-day, and feel more than usually flattered by the encomiums you have passed on our recent campaign, which is now complete by the occupation of Savannah....

I attach more importance to these deep incisions into the enemy's country, because this war differs from European wars in this particular:  we are not only fighting hostile armies, but a hostile people, and must make old and young, rich and poor, feel the hard hand of war, as well as their organized armies.  I know that this recent movement of mine through Georgia has had a wonderful effect in this respect.  Thousands who had been deceived by their lying newspapers to believe that we were being whipped all the time now realize the truth, and have no appetite for a repetition of the same experience.  To be sure, Jeff. Davis has his people under pretty good discipline, but I think faith in him is much shaken in Georgia, and before we have done with her South Carolina will not be quite so tempestuous.

I will bear in mind your hint as to Charleston, and do not think "salt" will be necessary.  When I move, the Fifteenth Corps will be on the right of the right wing, and their position will naturally bring them into Charleston first; and, if you have watched the history of that corps, you will have remarked that they generally do their work pretty well.  The truth is, the whole army is burning with an insatiable desire to wreak vengeance upon South Carolina.  I almost tremble at her fate, but feel that she deserves all that seems in store for her.

Many and many a person in Georgia asked me why we did not go to South Carolina; and, when I answered that we were en route  for that State, the invariable reply was, "Well, if you will make those people feel the utmost severities of war, we will pardon you for your desolation of Georgia."

I look upon Columbia as quite as bad as Charleston, and I doubt if we will spare the public buildings there as we did at Milledgeville [Georgia].... 

http://www.civilwar.org/education/history/primarysources/william-t-sherman-to-henry.html




General Sherman on the “March to the Sea,” 1865


A primary source by William T. Sherman

View this item in the Collection.



william t. sherman to james h. wilson, january 21, 1865. (glc02947)William T. Sherman to James H. Wilson, January 21, 1865. (Gilder Lehrman Collection)

In the fall of 1864, Gen. James H. Wilson took command of Gen. William T. Sherman’s cavalry. Sherman and Wilson met and discussed various operations in Sherman’s “March to the Sea” from Atlanta to Savannah, Georgia. Wilson’s instructions were to prevent Confederate Gen. John B. Hood from operating in Tennessee, to sweep through Alabama and Georgia, and to rejoin Sherman in either the Carolinas or Virginia.

Shortly after that meeting, Wilson and his 17,000 cavalry soldiers joined Gen. George H. Thomas’s troops in destroying Hood’s army. This letter, written on January 21, a month after the fall of Savannah on December 21, 1864, shows both Sherman and Wilson ready to begin the second phase of their plan: Sherman would march through the Carolinas and Wilson would take Alabama. The colorful General Sherman uses typically brash language to describe how he “knocked daylight through Georgia.”

A full transcript is available.


Transcript


Headquarters, Military Division of the Mississippi,
In the Field, Savannah, Geo 1865
January 21,    

Dear Wilson,

I got yours of January 5, and am glad to reciprocate your Kind expressions. I remember well our talks at the Camp fire at Gaylesville and think we have Cause of personal Congratulation that we have worked out the Calculation of that time. I knocked daylight through Georgia, and in retreating to the s[outh] like a sensible man I gathered up some plunder and walked into this beautiful City, whilst you & Thomas gave Hood & Forest, a taste of what they have to Expect by trying to meddle with our Conquered Territory. Kirkpatrick did very well and by Circling round pretty freely he Completely bamboozled Wheeler and so befuddled Hardee that he had no idea what was going on. – It is time for me to be off again for Columbia, but it has been raining hard and the Country is all under water, but I will soon be off. Kirkpatrick will have to keep close to our Infantry as Wheeler has a superior force but Kirkpatrick did whip him fairly at Waynesboro and thinks he can do it [ag]ain. I want Thomas to make the trip to Selma but can only give him general instructions.

I know that there is plenty of Forage in Alabama after you get 60 miles south of the Tennessee River all along down the Tombigbee and Black [Rivers] to arrive in large fields of Corn last fall, also below Talladega on the Coosa. The proper Route is from Decatur & Eastport to Columbia, then Tuscaloosa, Selma, and up the Coosa or Tallapoosa to Rome.

[text loss]

[written in another hand]

My route north is well inland

signed
                           W. T. Sherman


                                          Maj Gen

http://www.gilderlehrman.org/history-by-era/american-civil-war/resources/general-sherman-%E2%80%9Cmarch-sea%E2%80%9D-1865



[sherman\'s march to the sea]

http://www.loc.gov/pictures/resource/ppmsca.09326/



[sherman\'s march to the sea]

http://www.loc.gov/pictures/resource/cph.3a09983/


Name: ___________________________________________ Period: _________ Grade: _________



  1. Go to: http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2003679761/

  2. Read the information on the bibliographic page, then click on one of the pictures to the left to view in a larger size.

  3. Study the picture and observe the actions and scenes.

  4. Complete the chart below:




What do you observe?


What prior knowledge helps you

understand what you see?




What prior knowledge helps you

understand what you see?




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  1. Why do you think the Union soldier is destroying the telegraph lines? ______________________________

Interactive Map of Sherman’s March to Sea



http://www.history.com/interactives/shermans-march


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