Freshman courses history of Western Civilization



Download 79.89 Kb.
Date14.05.2016
Size79.89 Kb.
Social Science

The social science curriculum is designed to help each student develop intelligent and responsible citizenship. Teachers provide classroom experiences which will help students learn about democratic ideas and values. To be worthwhile, the knowledge of our heritage from the past must be matched with knowledge of today’s problems.


Four years of social science and history are offered at Maine East High School. District 207 requires three years of Social Science for graduation. At Maine East, all freshmen enroll in History of Western Civilization. During the junior year all students must enroll in two semesters of United States History (or American Studies). During the senior year all students must enroll in at least one semester of Government. AP US and Comparative Government is a one-year course. Satisfactory completion of both United States History and Government is a requirement for graduation. In addition, all students must pass a state-mandated examination on the U. S. Constitution, Illinois Constitution and Flag Code for graduation. These tests are administered in the Government courses.



FRESHMAN COURSES



History of Western Civilization

Course Code: 1130

Length: 2 Semesters

Periods: 1.0

Credits: 1.0

Grades: 9 only


Prerequisite: None
Students may enroll in the

accelerated, regular, transitional,

or English as a Second

Language levels with the

recommendations of the teacher and

department chair.


Descriptions of these levels appear

on the following pages.


History of Western Civilization is a one-year course for all Maine East freshmen. From the Classical Civilizations of Greece and Rome to post-World War II Europe, History of Western Civilization will help to build a foundation of content and skills that will benefit students throughout their high school experience. Skill development will emphasize critical thinking, reading, expository writing, vocabulary acquisition, interpretation of maps, graphs and charts, and information literacy. Major units of study include: Classical Civilizations, The Middle Ages, The Renaissance, The Age of Exploration, The Reformation, The Age of Reason, Political Revolutions, Nationalism and Liberalism, Imperialism/Colonialism, World War I, The Rise of Totalitarianism, World War II and the Holocaust (including the causes of genocide), The Cold War and Post Cold War Europe. Students will acquire a deeper understanding of the political, social, and economic systems in western civilization; how they have impacted the world in which we live; how multiple causes shape historical events; how the effects of historical events impact society, and how key individuals and ideas have altered history. It provides a background for understanding U. S. History and Government at all levels.





History of Western Civilization

Acc

Course Code: 1135

Length: 2 Semesters

Periods: 1.0

Credits: 1.0

Grades: 9 only


Prerequisite: Teacher and Department Chair approval

History of Western Civilization Accelerated is an enriched high school course for students with higher reading comprehension and better writing skills. Focusing on western history from the Classical Civilizations of Greece and Rome to post-World War II Europe, the course offers students the opportunity for in-depth study of the political, economic, religious, social and geographic causes and effects of major events in Western World History. The course prepares students for advanced work in the Accelerated and Advanced Placement History and Social Science courses.




History of Western Civilization T

Course Code: 1160T

Length: 2 Semesters

Periods: 1.0

Credits: 1.0

Grades: 9 only


Prerequisite: Teacher and Department Chair approval

History of Western Civilization Transitional is a course for freshmen whose reading and writing skills need improvement. Covering the time period from ancient Greece to post-World War II Europe, emphasis is on skill development and on content that will prepare the student for success in the classroom. Reading, writing, vocabulary acquisition strategies, and note taking skills are taught. Also taught are the social science critical thinking skills of map, graph, and chart interpretation.




SOPHOMORE COURSES




During the sophomore year students are encouraged to take Global Studies or AP European History to prepare for United States History and for Government. The Global Studies course is offered at the English as a Second Language, Transitional, Regular, and Accelerated levels.





Global Studies

Course Code: 1190

Length: 2 Semesters
Periods: 1.0

Credits: 1.0

Grades: 10 only
Prerequisite: None

Global Studies explores the geography, culture, and history of Asia, Latin America and Africa. For the first semester, the course will examine the ancient civilizations and early empires of the Middle East, China, India, Latin America, and Africa. The first semester will conclude with the Age of Exploration and European contact with these regions. During the second semester, the course will examine the impact of European colonialism, the creation of independent states, the causes of genocide and its impact in areas like Rwanda or Darfur, and the political, social, and economic changes of the more recent past. Throughout the course, geography, reading, and writing skills will be emphasized and developed in problem solving activities and project assignments. Building on the History of Western Civilization course, this sophomore elective will strengthen critical thinking skills and contribute to the development of a global perspective and an appreciation for cultural diversity.





Global Studies Acc

Course Code: 1195

Length: 2 Semesters

Periods: 1.0

Credits: 1.0

Grades: 10 only


Prerequisite: Teacher and

Department Chair Approval



Global Studies Accelerated is an enriched high school level course that focuses on Asia, Latin America and Africa in the past century. The impact of the interaction between cultures is the starting point for the course. Development of reading, writing, vocabulary, and critical thinking skills will occur as students engage in problem solving activities about modern crises. Building on the History of Western Civilization course, the sophomore elective provides insight into the cultures of the world.




Global Studies T

Course Code: 1190T

Length: 2 Semesters

Periods: 1.0

Credits: 1.0

Grades: 10 only


Prerequisite: Teacher and Department Chair approval

Global Studies Transitional focuses on the changes in South Asia, East Asia, the Middle East, Africa and Latin America during the last century. It emphasizes reading remediation and basic social science skills. Furthermore, the course builds on the social science skills taught in History of Western Civilization Transitional to prepare students for United States History. Placement in the Transitional level is based upon students’ reading and writing ability as demonstrated in the History of Western Civilization course during freshman year.





AP European History

Course Code: 1807

Length: 2 Semesters

Periods: 1.0

Credits: 1.0

Grades: 10 or 12


Prerequisite: Teacher and

Department Chair approval.



This collegelevel course in European History emphasizes key political, economic, social, cultural and intellectual movements in European history beginning with the Renaissance and extending through the collapse of communism in Eastern Europe. Students are required to complete a summer assignment(s) in preparation for the course. Students taking this class will take the College Board exam in European History at the end of the year, which will afford them the opportunity to earn college credit.




JUNIOR COURSES

United States History (open to juniors) and Government (open to seniors) constitute an important threesemester sequence in the study of the foundations, the heritage, and the present condition of our country.


Four programs for meeting the United States History requirement are offered at four ability levels: Advanced Placement, Regular, Transitional, and English as a Second Language.



U. S. History

Course Code: 1000

Length: 2 Semesters

Periods: 1.0

Credits: 1.0

Grades: 11 only


Prerequisite: None

United States History covers the history of our country from the Age of Exploration up to the present. First semester ends with the Reconstruction period.

Second semester covers the history of our country from 1877 to the present. Course themes include the creation of a nation, African-American history, industrialization, the Progressive movement, women’s history, the Age of Imperialism, and 20th century American foreign policy. United States History is a prerequisite for senior government.



American Studies

Course Code: 1440

Length: 2 Semesters

Periods: 2.0

Credits: 1.0 credit in English and

1.0 credit in U.S. History

Grades: 11 only

Prerequisite: Successful completion

of English 2



American Studies is a course for regular juniors. This interdisciplinary, teamtaught course offers credit in both junior English and U.S. History. It uses literature, history, art, music, and architecture to develop an understanding of American culture. Course themes include the creation of a nation, African-American history, industrialization, the Progressive movement, women’s history, the Age of Imperialism, and 20th century American foreign policy. Class activities will include speakers, field trips, and projects as well as readings and discussion to emphasize major themes. Students earn one credit in English 3 and one credit in U.S. History.




American Studies T

Course Code: 1440T

Length: 2 Semesters

Periods: 2.0

Credits: 1.0 credit in English and

1.0 credit in U. S. History

Grades: 11 only
Prerequisite: Teacher and

Department Chair approval



American Studies Transitional is designed for those students who have reading and writing difficulties, but covers the same time frame and content as regular U.S. History. This inter-disciplinary, team-taught course offers credit in both junior English and U. S. History. Students produce the same district assessments as regular U.S. History with additional support. Students will enroll in regular Government senior year.




AP United States History

Course Code: 1007

Length: 2 Semesters

Periods: 1.0

Credits: 1.0

Grades: 11 only


Prerequisite: Teacher and

Department Chair approval




Advanced Placement United States History is a collegelevel course open to juniors who are capable of doing advanced work. Course themes include the creation of a nation, African-American history, industrialization, the Progressive movement, women’s history, the Age of Imperialism, and 20th century American foreign policy. Students are required to complete a summer assignment(s) in preparation for the course. This is an intense and fast-paced survey of U. S. History, which is designed to prepare students to earn college credit by performing satisfactorily on the Advanced Placement examination in May.





SENIOR COURSES






Government

Course Code: 1200

Length: 1 Semester

Periods: 1.0

Credits: 0.5

Grades: 12 only


Prerequisite: Completion of U. S. History
This course is also offered at the

English as a Second Language level.



Government is a one-semester required course in the structure and functions of the American political system on the federal, state and local levels.


The U.S. Constitution, the Illinois Constitution and Flag Code examinations, which students are required to take and pass for graduation, are given in this course


AP US/Comparative Government

Course Code: 1207

Length: 2 Semesters

Periods: 1.0

Credits: 1.0

Grades: 12 only


Prerequisite: Completion of United States History; Teacher

and Department Chair approval



Advanced Placement Government is a collegelevel course in political science and government. One semester covers the structure and functions of American government; the other semester deals with comparative governmental systems, including a study of the governments of Great Britain, Russia, Mexico, Nigeria, China and Iran. Students enrolled in this course will be expected to take both the AP U.S. and AP Comparative Government exams. Students are required to complete a summer assignment(s) in preparation for the course.




AP European History

Course Code: 1807

Length: 2 Semesters

Periods: 1.0

Credits: 1.0

Grades: 10 or 12


Prerequisite: Teacher and

Department Chair approval



This collegelevel course in European History emphasizes key political, economic, social, cultural and intellectual movements in European history beginning with the Renaissance and extending through the collapse of communism in Eastern Europe. Students are required to complete a summer assignment(s) in preparation for the course. Students taking this class will take the College Board exam in European History at the end of the year, which will afford them the opportunity to earn college credit.




Economics:_Macroeconomics_and_Microeconomics'>AP Economics: Macroeconomics and Microeconomics

Course Code: 1407

Length: 2 Semesters

Periods: 1.0

Credits: 1.0

Grades: 11 or 12


Prerequisite: Teacher and

Department Chair approval.



This year-long, college level course covers micro economics and macro economics. Students are required to complete a summer assignment(s) in preparation for the course. Students taking this class will take the Advanced Placement exams in Micro Economics and Macro Economics in May, offering them the opportunity to earn college credit. Completion of this course does not meet the Government requirement, but it does meet the state Consumer Education requirement for graduation.





AP Psychology

Course Code: 1357

Length: 2 Semesters

Periods: 1.0

Credits: 1.0

Grades: 11 or 12


Prerequisite: Teacher and

Department Chair approval.


This college level course provides an introduction to the discipline of psychology. The course will begin with the history and approaches of psychology and then branch into an investigation of the various areas of psychology including topics such as research methods, biological behavioral bases, sensation & perception, learning & cognition, personality theory & development, and abnormal & social psychology. Students enrolled in this course are expected to take the AP Psychology Exam at the end of the course which may earn them college credit.





Semester Electives for Juniors and Seniors

The Social Science electives are onesemester courses that meet one period daily and offer onehalf unit of credit.





Economics

Course Code: 1400

Length: 1 Semester

Periods: 1.0

Credits: 0.5

Grades: 11 or 12


Prerequisite: None

Economics introduces students to the basic economic concepts of the free enterprise system, although some material on other economic systems is included. Topics covered include types of market systems, factors of production, supply and demand, the stock market and investing, money and banking, government fiscal policies, and the international economy. Successful completion of this course meets the state’s Consumer Education requirement for graduation. This class serves as a useful introduction for those planning on taking an economics class at the college level.





Law in American Society

Course Code: 1700

Length: 1 Semester

Periods: 1.0

Credits: 0.5

Grades: 11 or 12


Prerequisite: None

Law in American Society looks at civil, criminal, and constitutional law, the legal process, and the legal rights of individual citizens. Heavy emphasis is placed on actual statutes and cases. Students learn interpretations of such constitutional rights issues as free speech, the right to privacy, criminal justice, capital punishment and equality of citizenship. Classroom activities include lectures, mock trials, films, and discussion of recent Supreme Court decisions.





Sociology

Course Code: 1360

Length: 1 Semester

Periods: 1.0

Credits: 0.5

Grade: 11 or 12


Prerequisite: None

Sociology is the study of human interaction. The goal of the course is to help the student to gain an understanding of the structures and functions of the basic social institutions common to all societies. The focus is primarily upon contemporary American society, but comparisons with other cultures are made.

Topics covered include the techniques of the sociologist, the nature of culture and cultural change, social class and social mobility, racial and ethnic relations, population pressures, the family as a social institution, and deviant behavior.



Current Affairs

Course Code: 1500

Length: 1 Semester

Periods: 1.0

Credits: 0.5

Grades: 11 or 12


Prerequisite: None

Current Affairs is designed to focus on contemporary problems. The scope of these problems will be both global and domestic. Social problems such as crime and poverty as well as economic issues will be examined.






History of Ethnic Chicago

Course Code: 1320

Length: 1 Semester

Periods: 1.0

Credits: 0.5

Grades: 11 or 12


Prerequisite: None
This course is also offered at the English as a Second Language level.

History of Ethnic Chicago is a course that focuses on specific ethnic/racial groups that have had an impact on American culture while living in Chicago. The class examines the reasons why ethnic/racial groups came to Chicago; in what part of the city they settled; the type of community institutions they established; and the economic, political, and social achievements of individuals belonging to specific ethnic/racial groups.





Anthropology

Course Code: 1300

Length: 1 Semester

Periods: 1.0

Credits: 0.5

Grades: 11 or 12


Prerequisite: None



Anthropology is the study of physical and cultural changes in human beings over time. It is perhaps the most scientific of the social sciences especially in looking at early human evolution. This class studies both physical and cultural anthropology in the context of the eight subfields of anthropology which include the following: archeology, paleoanthropology, human evolution, human variation, primatology, historical linguistics, sociolinguistics, and ethnology. This class serves as an introduction to the exciting field of anthropology.



Share with your friends:




The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2020
send message

    Main page