Food $ense Kids Jicama



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Food $ense Kids

Jicama


Written by: Kelsey Rich RD

Brought to you by the Utah Food $ense program

Part 3 of the Preschool Obesity Prevention: Meal Planning and Quick Meals


Objectives

Participant will:

  1. Participate in a cooking/food sensory experience and sample food.

  2. Participate in a physical activity or game that reinforces the food concept.

  3. Identify food name through reading, writing or activity.

  4. Participate in a food exposure experience by doing an art, craft or other activity.


Teacher Instructions:

*Background facts and information for the teacher is included on page 5.


This curriculum is to be used in a variety of ways. If time is limited, pick one food experience and one activity to supplement. Each activity is to be approximately 10-15 minutes. Additional activities are included in the back of this lesson that can be substituted or included in the lesson.
Required Materials:

  • Introduction materials - Fresh jicama to show the class (page 2).

  • Ingredients for recipes and materials for food demonstration (page 4).

  • Physical activity materials (page 2).

  • Reading/writing activity materials (page 3).

  • Art, craft and other activity materials (page 3).

  • Utah Food $ense – required paperwork for program

Optional Supplemental Materials:

  • Extra jicama picture included on page 12.


Preparation Required:

  • Review lesson plan.

  • Review teacher background information (see page 5).

  • Gather ingredients and materials needed to demonstrate the recipes (see page 4).

  • Prepare materials for objectives 2, 3, and 4.

  • Make copies of take home handout with recipes you wish to distribute (see page 4) – enough for all class participants to take home to families.

  • Utah Food $ense - Make copies of all required paperwork for lesson.

LESSON PLAN

Introduction

Time: 5 minutes

Show the class a fresh jicama.

Ask the class: Does anyone know what this is?

Pass the jicama around for the kids to touch and feel.



Ask the class: What do you think jicama looks like? Feels like?

Explain: Today we are going to talk about jicama. Jicama is in the legume (bean) family and is sometimes called the Mexican potato or yam bean. Jicama is a root and grows under the ground. Jicama has a brown skin. When the skin is removed, it is white in the middle (this is the part we eat). Show the class the middle of a cut jicama. Explain to the class that jicama has a vitamin in it that helps them so you don’t get sick (vitamin C).
Objective 1: Participate in a cooking/ food sensory experience and sample food.

Time: 15 minutes



  • Choose a recipe that will work for your lesson:


Objective 2: Participate in a physical activity or game that reinforces the food concept.

Time: 5-10 minutes




Jicama Scavenger Hunt

  • Print page 9 and cut on the lines. Number the pieces from 1-5.

  • Keep the #1 piece and hide the remaining pieces around the room.

    • Write clues on the back of each piece to give the kids a hint of where the next puzzle piece is. (i.e. Put a piece by the sink and write “I am by where we wash our hands” on the previous piece).

  • Read the kids the clues to have them find the puzzle pieces. When the last piece is found put the puzzle together and read the message.

  • Message: “Some people think I taste like a pear or an apple. What do you think?”

  • Give each child a sample cup with a jicama piece and have them try a raw piece of jicama.

  • Have a brief discussion on what it tastes like.

Objective 3: Identify food name through reading, writing or other activity.

Time: 10-15 minutes



R-O-O-T-S (Played like BINGO)

  • Give each child a playing card. (See page 6).

  • Cut out the letters on page 7-8. Mix them up and draw them randomly. Read the letter and color and show the card to the students. (You can choose what the children use to mark the spaces that have been called).

When the class gets 5 in a row the game is over. You may play blackout if you have more time
Objective 4: Participate in a food exposure experience by doing an art, craft, or other activity.

Time: 10 minutes



Picture Sequence

Discuss with the children the process of planting a seed and how root vegetables are harvested. Use the pictures found on page 11.



  • Jicama is a root vegetable that grows in warm, tropical climates. To grow, the farmer plants the seeds in the soil. The farmer waters the plant and make sure it receives plenty of sun. A vine will begin to grow. Jicama grows on a vine that can reach 20 feet tall. The vines hug the ground. The vine has large leaves and big blue or white flowers on it. The vine has an edible root (jicama) rather than an above ground vegetable crop. It can take 3 to 6 months for jicama to grow into an edible root. After 3 to 6 months, they are ready to harvest! The farmers pull the roots out of the soil. They send them to the grocery store so you and your family can buy them to eat!

  • After you go through the process with the class, each child should get a copy of page 10 and the corresponding pictures. Page 11 has pictures for 2 children (cut the pictures beforehand, mix them up, and paperclip them to the worksheet).

  • Let the kids put their pictures in order and glue them on their worksheet.


Conclusion:

Time: 5 minutes




  • What is it? Where does it grow?

  • How does it grow?

  • What can you make with it?

  • What colors is the outside? Inside?

  • How does it help your body?

  • Discussion of food experience—what was your favorite part?

  • Did you like the food?


Resources :

http://myfolia.com/plants/2863-jicama-pachyrhizus-erosus

http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-jicama.htm

http://www.allrecipes.com

http://www.foodnetwork.com

This material was funded by USDA’s Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program – SNAP. The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) provides nutrition assistance to people with low income. It can help you buy nutritious foods for a better diet. To find out more, contact 1-800-221-5689 or visit online at http://www.fns.usda.gov/snap/.  In accordance with Federal Law and U.S. Department of Agriculture policy, this institution is prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, religion, political beliefs or disability. To file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, 1400 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20250-9410 or call (800)795-3572.

RECIPES

Topic: Jicama

Jicama with Lime
Ingredients:
1 Jicama

½ C lime juice


Directions:

Peel the skin off the Jicama with a vegetable peeler. Cut the Jicama in any shapes or sizes as you would like. (They are commonly julienned.) Drizzle lime juice over each piece of jicama. Enjoy!


Raspberry Jicama Salad
Ingredients
2 bags of mixed salad greens

2 C fresh raspberries

½ Jicama, peeled and chopped

1 C raspberry vinaigrette dressing (or as much/little as needed)


Directions
Peel Jicama with a vegetable peeler and chop into small pieces. Mix jicama, raspberries, and salad greens together. Add dressing as desired.
Jicama Slaw
Ingredients
1 jicama peeled and chopped

¼ cup fresh cilantro leaves

2 tablespoons lime juice

2 tablespoons lemon juice

1 can pineapple chunks in 100% juice, drained with ¼ cup liquids reserved
Directions
Combine jicama, cilantro, lime and lemon juice, pineapple chunks, and pineapple juice. Let cool in fridge if time allows. Serve.
This material was funded by USDA’s Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program – SNAP. The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) provides nutrition assistance to people with low income. It can help you buy nutritious foods for a better diet. To find out more, contact 1-800-221-5689 or visit online at http://www.fns.usda.gov/snap/.  In accordance with Federal Law and U.S. Department of Agriculture policy, this institution is prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, religion, political beliefs or disability. To file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, 1400 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20250-9410 or call (800)795-3572.

Preschool Curriculum

Jicama

Background Teaching Information
History:
Jicama (pronounced hee-ca-ma) is quite a popular vegetable in Latin America, Central America, and Mexico. It is a root vegetable and belongs to the legume family. The outside of jicama is brown, gray, or tan. It looks similar to a turnip and is crisp like water chestnuts. Jicama has a short stubby root. Jicama grows on a vine that can get 10 to 20 feet long. The vine hugs the ground. The jicama plant has large leaves and big blue and white flowers. The vine also produces a bean pod that is toxic and should not be eaten. The bean pods can be gathered and planted to grow more jicama plants. The vine has an edible root (jicama) rather than an above ground vegetable crop. It can take 3 to 6 months for jicama to grow into an edible root. After 3 to 6 months, they are ready to harvest!
Nutrition:

Jicama is a low calorie food, only containing approximately 20 calories per half cup. It also contains high amounts of dietary fiber and vitamin C.


Eating:
Jicama is often added to Latin and Mexican foods because it easily takes on the flavors of the other ingredients. In addition, jicama is great when eaten raw. Raw jicama has a wonderfully light, crisp, and juicy flavor, much like that of an apple or pear. Jicama, when cut into strips or wedges, can make a great addition to a vegetable or fruit platter too. Jicama is available year-round, but the best months to buy it is November through June. Choose a jicama that is firm, does not have blemished skin, cracks, or is bruised, moldy, or discolored. Jicama should be heavy for its size. Those less than four pounds (or medium in size) usually taste better.

Peel the jicama with a knife or peeler before using it. After purchase, jicama can be stored for 2 weeks in a cool, dry place.



Resources:

http://www.extension.iastate.edu/healthnutrition/foodrecipeactivity/food/jicama.htm

http://myfolia.com/plants/2863-jicama-pachyrhizus-erosus

http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-jicama.htm

dr-baumann-export.com

clipartguide.com



This material was funded by USDA’s Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program – SNAP. The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) provides nutrition assistance to people with low income. It can help you buy nutritious foods for a better diet. To find out more, contact 1-800-221-5689 or visit online at http://www.fns.usda.gov/snap/.  In accordance with Federal Law and U.S. Department of Agriculture policy, this institution is prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, religion, political beliefs or disability. To file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, 1400 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20250-9410 or call (800)795-3572.


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JICAMA

SOME PEOPLE THINK I TASTE LIKE APPLES OR PEARS….

WHAT DO YOU THINK?


JICAMA: FROM SEED TO PLATE

1. Plant Seeds

2. Provide water and sunlight

3. Watch it grow

4. After 3-6 months, jicama is ready for harvest!

5. Buy it at the store—Jicama is available year-round.

6. Jicama can be eaten raw. Great in salads, salsa, and stir fry! Enjoy!




















































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