Focus: Shortly after the Constitutional Convention adjourned, Robert Morris said to George Washington, “No Constitution is the same on Paper and in Life.” What did he mean be this statement? Student Objectives


-Read and outline Chapter 7, Section 3, pgs 247-249-start @ Whiskey Rebellion (due 1/7)



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-Read and outline Chapter 7, Section 3, pgs 247-249-start @ Whiskey Rebellion (due 1/7)


-Read and outline Chapter 7, Section 4 pgs. 250-253 (due 1/8)

-Chapter 7 Test Monday 1/11


Handouts:

Quote Sheet


I. Quote analysis
Key terms/ideas/ people/places:

John Adams James Madison Patrick Henry Thomas Paine Benjamin Franklin

Alexander Hamilton Thomas Jefferson George Washington


By the end of class today, I will be able to answer the following:

Why could the same man or woman praise a person in one year and then attack them in another?

Where the Founding Fathers friends, enemies, or frenemies? Explain.
More than two centuries after the groundbreaking events of the American struggle for independence, its key figures strike us more as players in a myth than as people who lived, worked, and interacted with one another. To recover the human dimension of the founders, we need look no further than their own words.”

-John P. Kaminski


Directions: Even though the Founding Fathers have their own unique place on top of an American Olympus, they certainly did not always agree with one another. Though they respected one another, they often times became political rivals and were not afraid of firing off insults. Read the following quotes from the Founders and see if you can identify the person they were talking about by writing their name on the line.


  • “Always an honest Man, often a wise one, but sometimes, and in some things, absolutely out of his senses.”

    • Benjamin Franklin on




  • “…a gloomy, stiff creature, they say is clever in Congress, but out of it he has nothing engaging or even bearable in his Manners—the most unsociable creature in Existence.”




  • “all tongue without either head or heart.”

    • Thomas Jefferson on




  • “It has been the political career of this man to begin with hypocrisy, proceed with arrogance, and finish in contempt. May such be the fate of all such characters.”

    • Thomas Paine on




  • “a Mongrel between Pigg and Puppy, begotten by a wild Boar on a [w]itch Wolf [who had] a Career of Mischief.”




  • “a Man of Artifice and Duplicity, of Ambition and Vanity, of Jealousy and Envy.”

    • John Adams on




  • “I hope you enjoy Health. Dr. Lee says you grow very fat.”

    • Abigail Adams on




  • “He hates Franklin, he hates Jay, he hates the French, he hates the English….Notwithstanding all this he has a sound head on substantial points, and I think he has integrity.”

    • Thomas Jefferson on


  • “Some of the opinions he is supposed to entertain, we do not approve—but we believe him to be honest firm faithful and independent—a sincere lover of his country—a real friend to genuine liberty….”







  • “There is no abler or better American, that I know of.”

    • John Adams on




  • “Being seventy Years of Age, the Ladies not only allow him to embrace them as often as he pleases, but they are perpetually embracing him.”

    • John Adams on




  • “Congress had the fullest evidence and conviction that____ was both a dishonest & incapable man.”

    • Arthur Lee on




  • “You may praise who you please & I will presume to say that I think Publius is a most admirable writer…who I think in Genius & political Research is not inferior to Gibbon, Hume or Montesquieu.”




  • “He is undoubtedly one of the most sensible men in America, though yet not much more than Thirty years old.”

    • Samuel Blachley on




  • “He really appears to be, what I have some times thought him, a shim sham politician.”

    • Abraham Clark on




  • “His origin was infamous; his place of birth and education were foreign countries; his fortune was poverty itself….”

    • John Adams on




  • “A bas…. Bratt of a Scotch Pedlar.”

    • John Adams on



  • “No better minister could be sent to France. He is everything that is good, upright, enlightened, and clever, and is respected and beloved by everyone that knows him.”

    • Marquis do Lafayette on




  • “I do now know him to be one of the most artful, intriguing, industrious and double-faced politicians in all of America.”

    • John Nicholas on




  • “…to prevent an Atheist in Religion and a Fanatic in politics from getting possession of the helm of the State.”

    • Alexander Hamilton on




  • In “cooperating with Mr. Jefferson…[he has] a womanish attachment to France and a womanish resentment against Great Britain.”

    • Alexander Hamilton on




  • “I am neither farmer, manufacturer, mechanic, merchant nor shopkeeper. I believe, however, I am of the first class. I am a Farmer of thoughts.”

    • _________on himself




  • “Dignity with ease, and complacency, the Gentleman and Soldier look agreeably blended in him. Modesty marks every line and feature of his face.”

    • Abigail Adams on




  • “At length then the military career of the greatest Man on earth is closed.”




  • “My fine crab-tree walking stick, with a gold head curiously wrought in the form of the cap of liberty, I give to my friend, and the friend of mankind….If it were a Scepter, he has merited it, and would become it.”

    • Ben Franklin on




  • “He alone has the confidence of the People. In Him they believe and through him they remain United.”

    • Samuel Osgood on






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