Fcc 07-71 Before the Federal Communications Commission Washington, D


C. Description and Estimate of the Number of Small Entities



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C. Description and Estimate of the Number of Small Entities

To Which the Proposals Will Apply
4. The RFA directs the Commission to provide a description of and, where feasible, an estimate of the number of small entities that will be affected by the proposed rules, if adopted.49 The RFA defines the term “small entity” as having the same meaning as the terms “small business,” “small organization,” and “small governmental jurisdiction.”50 In addition, the term “small business” has the same meaning as the term “small business concern” under the Small Business Act.51 A small business concern is one which: (1) is independently owned and operated; (2) is not dominant in its field of operation; and (3) satisfies any additional criteria established by the Small Business Administration (“SBA”).52 The rules we may adopt as a result of the comments filed in response to this Second Further Notice of Proposed Rulemaking will primarily affect cable operators and television stations. A description of these small entities, as well as an estimate of the number of such small entities, is provided below.

5. Cable and Other Program Distribution. The Census Bureau defines this category as follows: “This industry comprises establishments primarily engaged as third-party distribution systems for broadcast programming. The establishments of this industry deliver visual, aural, or textual programming received from cable networks, local television stations, or radio networks to consumers via cable or direct-to-home satellite systems on a subscription or fee basis. These establishments do not generally originate programming material.”53 The SBA has developed a small business size standard for Cable and Other Program Distribution, which is: all such firms having $13.5 million or less in annual receipts.54 According to Census Bureau data for 2002, there were a total of 1,191 firms in this category that operated for the entire year.55 Of this total, 1,087 firms had annual receipts of under $10 million, and 43 firms had receipts of $10 million or more but less than $25 million.56 Thus, under this size standard, the majority of firms can be considered small. We note, however, that the proposals at issue in this Second FNPRM only apply at this time to cable operators,57 and not other MVPD providers.58


6. Cable Companies and Systems. The Commission has also developed its own small business size standards, for the purpose of cable rate regulation. Under the Commission’s rules, a “small cable company” is one serving 400,000 or fewer subscribers, nationwide.59 Industry data indicate that, of 1,076 cable operators nationwide, all but eleven are small under this size standard.60 In addition, under the Commission’s rules, a “small system” is a cable system serving 15,000 or fewer subscribers.61 Industry data indicate that, of 7,208 systems nationwide, 6,139 systems have under 10,000 subscribers, and an additional 379 systems have 10,000-19,999 subscribers.62 Thus, under this second size standard, most cable systems are small.

7. Cable System Operators. The Communications Act of 1934, as amended, also contains a size standard for small cable system operators, which is “a cable operator that, directly or through an affiliate, serves in the aggregate fewer than 1 percent of all subscribers in the United States and is not affiliated with any entity or entities whose gross annual revenues in the aggregate exceed $250,000,000.”63 The Commission has determined that an operator serving fewer than 677,000 subscribers shall be deemed a small operator, if its annual revenues, when combined with the total annual revenues of all its affiliates, do not exceed $250 million in the aggregate.64 Industry data indicate that, of 1,076 cable operators nationwide, all but ten are small under this size standard.65 We note that the Commission neither requests nor collects information on whether cable system operators are affiliated with entities whose gross annual revenues exceed $250 million,66 and therefore we are unable to estimate more accurately the number of cable system operators that would qualify as small under this size standard.


8. Television Broadcasting. The proposed rules and policies apply to digital television broadcast licensees, and potential licensees of digital television service. The SBA defines a television broadcast station as a small business if such station has no more than $13 million in annual receipts.67 Business concerns included in this industry are those “primarily engaged in broadcasting images together with sound.”68 According to Commission staff review of the BIA Publications, Inc. Master Access Television Analyzer Database (BIA) on October 18, 2005, about 873 of the 1,307 commercial television stations69 (or about 67 percent) have revenues of $12 million or less and thus qualify as small entities under the SBA definition. We note, however, that, in assessing whether a business concern qualifies as small under the above definition, business (control) affiliations70 must be included. Our estimate, therefore, likely overstates the number of small entities that might be affected by our action, because the revenue figure on which it is based does not include or aggregate revenues from affiliated companies.

9. In addition, an element of the definition of “small business” is that the entity not be dominant in its field of operation. We are unable at this time to define or quantify the criteria that would establish whether a specific television station is dominant in its field of operation. Accordingly, the estimate of small businesses to which rules may apply do not exclude any television station from the definition of a small business on this basis and are therefore over-inclusive to that extent. Also as noted, an additional element of the definition of “small business” is that the entity must be independently owned and operated. We note that it is difficult at times to assess these criteria in the context of media entities and our estimates of small businesses to which they apply may be over-inclusive to this extent.

10. Other Program Distribution. The SBA-recognized definition of Cable and Other Program Distribution includes other MVPDs, such as HSD, MDS/MMDS, ITFS, LMDS and OVS. This definition provides that a small entity is one with $13.5 million or less in annual receipts.71 As previously noted, according to the Census Bureau data for 2002, there were a total of 1,191 firms that operated for the entire year in the category of Cable and Other Program Distribution. Of this total, 1,087 firms had annual receipts of under $10 million and an additional 43 firms had receipts of $10 million or more, but less than $25 million.72 The Commission estimates that the majority of providers in this category of Cable and Other Program Distribution are small businesses.
11. While SBA approval for a Commission-defined small business size standard applicable to ITFS is pending, educational institutions are included in this analysis as small entities.73 There are currently 2,032 ITFS licensees, and all but 100 of these licenses are held by educational institutions. Thus, the Commission estimates that at least 1,932 ITFS licensees are small businesses.

12. Radio and Television Broadcasting and Wireless Communications Equipment Manufacturing. The Census Bureau defines this category as follows: “This industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing radio and television broadcast and wireless communications equipment. Examples of products made by these establishments are: transmitting and receiving antennas, cable television equipment, GPS equipment, pagers, cellular phones, mobile communications equipment, and radio and television studio and broadcasting equipment.”74 The SBA has developed a small business size standard for Radio and Television Broadcasting and Wireless Communications Equipment Manufacturing, which is: all such firms having 750 or fewer employees.75 According to Census Bureau data for 2002, there were a total of 1,041 establishments in this category that operated for the entire year.76 Of this total, 1,010 had employment of under 500, and an additional 13 had employment of 500 to 999.77 Thus, under this size standard, the majority of firms can be considered small.





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