Fall 2016 English Department



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FALL 2016

English Department



Course #

Course Title & Cross-lists

Location

Days

Times

Instructor

LAFs

Engl. 100-01

Analytical Reading and Writing

HOL 217

MW

9:30-10:50

TBA




Engl. 100-02

Analytical Reading and Writing

LAR 231

MW

1:00-2:20

TBA




Engl. 100-03

Analytical Reading and Writing

HOL 211

MW

2:30-3:50

TBA




Engl. 102-01

Academic Writing Seminar

HOL 211

MW

8:00-9:20

TBA

WA

Engl. 102-02

Academic Writing Seminar

HOL 211

TTH

8:00-9:20

TBA

WA

Engl. 102-03

Academic Writing Seminar

HOL 211

MW

9:30-10:50

David Fite

WA

Engl. 102-04

Academic Writing Seminar

LIB 104

TTH

9:30-10:50

TBA

WA

Engl. 102-05

Academic Writing Seminar

HOL 211

MW

11:30-12:50

TBA

WA

Engl. 102-06

Academic Writing Seminar

HOL 217

TTH

11:30-12:50

TBA

WA

Engl. 102-07

Academic Writing Seminar

DUKE 201

MW

1:00-2:20

TBA

WA

Engl. 102-08

Academic Writing Seminar

HOL 211

TTH

1:00-2:20

TBA

WA

Engl. 102-09

Academic Writing Seminar

HOL 207

MW

2:30-3:50

David Fite

WA

Engl. 102-10

Academic Writing Seminar

HOL 209

TTH

2:30-3:50

Claudia Ingram

WA

Engl. 126-01

Literary Inquiries

HOL 207

WF

9:30-10:50

Heather King

HL, WA

Engl. 161-01

Not Your Father’s Essay

HOL 207

TTH

9:30-10:50

Heather King

HL

Engl. 201-01

Critical Reading

HOL 207

TTH

2:30-3:50

Sharon Oster




Engl. 212-01

Fiction

HOL 207

MW

1:00-2:20

David Fite

HL

Engl. 213-02

Drama

HOL 213

MW

2:30-3:50

Nancy Carrick

HL

Engl. 221-01

Shakespeare to 1600

Fulfills pre-1800 requirement.

HOL 213

TTH

2:30-3:50

Nancy Carrick




Engl. 233-01

African-American Literature

Cross-listed with REST.

HOL 209

MW

9:30-10:50

Sheila Lloyd

DD, HL

Engl. 237-01

Immigrant Literature

Coming to America: Immigration, Race and Ethnicity in American Literature

Cross-listed with REST.

HOL 209

TTH

9:30-10:50

Sharon Oster

HL

Engl. 250-01

Theories of Popular Culture

Cross-listed with REST, VMS, WGS.

HOL 207

MW

11:00-12:20

Priya Jha

WA

Engl. 308-01

Mentoring College Writers

HOL 217

MW

2:30-3:50

Bridgette Callahan




Engl. 322-01

The Eighteenth Century :

Regicides, Libertines,

Bluestockings, and Fops

Cross-listed with WGS.

Fulfills pre-1800 requirement.


HOL 209

MWF

11:30-12:50

Heather King






FALL 2016

English Department



Course #

Course Title & Cross-lists

Location

Days

Times

Instructor

LAFs

Engl. 331-01

American Literature:

Industry and Enterprise

“Coming of Age in the Gilded Age”


HOL 207

TTH

11:30-12:50

Sharon Oster




Engl. 351-01

Postcolonialism, Global and

Transnational Literatures:



Disease, Hygiene, and

the Colonial Imaginary

Cross-listed with BIOL, REST, WGS.

HOL 211

MW

1:00-2:20

Priya Jha

Ben Aronson



DD, HL,

M3


Engl. 402-01

History of Literary Criticism

and Theory



HOL 217

TTH

9:30-10:50

Anne Cavender




Engl. 420-01

Senior Seminar in Literature

HOL 213

TTH

1:00-2:20

Judith Tschann

WB

FALL 2016

Courses taught by English Faculty

in other departments


Course #

Course Title & Cross-lists

Location

Days

Times

Instructor

LAFs

EVST 215-01

American Environmental Literature

Cross-listed with ENGL.

HOL 209

TTH

8:00-9:20

Anne Cavender

HL, WB

JNST 000J-01

Latin Tutorials

HOL 213

WF

9:30-10:50

Judith Tschann




FS 100-V

Imagining Worlds: Literature and the Environment

HOL 213

TTH

11:00-12:20

Claudia Ingram

FS, WA

FS 100-W

Play It Again: Love and Conflict,

Venus and Mars, or Why Can’t



We Just Get Along?

HOL 213

MW

1:00-2:20

Nancy Carrick

FS, HL



FALL 2016

English Department


ENGLISH 102-03 MW 9:30-10:50

ENGLISH 102-09 MW 2:30-3:50

Academic Writing Seminar WA

David Fite
This course will offer intensive practice in forms of academic writing that are important to your success as students and ultimately as informed citizens of a democratic society. We will focus on critical reading and analytical writing from sources, emphasizing writing as decision-making throughout the writing process. You will construct claim-driven writing projects through repeated practice in generating, focusing, and refining ideas. You will develop your awareness and use of basic research strategies and citation conventions for arguments grounded in reference to other texts.
ENGLISH 102-10 TTH 2:30-3:50

Academic Writing Seminar WA

Claudia Ingram
Discovering new writing strategies can be a peculiarly liberating experience. This may be the most important class you’ll take in college.
ENGLISH 126-01 WF 9:30-10:50

Literary Inquiries HL, WA

Heather King
This course will begin with some iconic titles of nineteenth-century British Literature. Over the course of the semester, we will work on developing the analytic skills necessary to have a meaningful conversation about a piece of writing, by practicing those skills in both our in-class discussions and in written essays. The central theme that will unify the reading list is the image of the monster. How have authors represented monstrosity? How have we adapted those monsters to modern media? What do the monsters we imagine tell us about our world? Ourselves? Readings may include: Frankenstein (Mary Shelley), Dracula (Bram Stoker), Picture of Dorian Gray (Oscar Wilde), and Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (Robert Louis Stevenson).

ENGLISH 161-01 TTH 9:30-10:50

Studies in Literature: HL

Not Your Father’s Essay

Heather King
Despite repeated cries about the death of print media, we are swimming in written communication these days, including the evolving essay format. From Cracked to Slate to HuffPo to the National Review, and across more blogs than one could count, the essay is still thriving after more than 2000 years of circulation. This course will begin with a look at the progenitor of our modern blogs and short essays, the “periodical essays” of the British eighteenth century. It is no coincidence that these early magazines flourished as social concepts of popular culture were changing. We’ll move quickly forward, exploring a variety of essay genres and formats, include those just-written. Students will produce their own essays, first individually, then later in a “club” a lá the eighteenth-century practice, culminating in a public essay (format will be determined by club preference – zine, blog, vlog, etc).
ENGLISH 201-01 TTH 2:30-3:50

Critical Reading

Sharon Oster
Why do we study literature? Distinct from other kinds of writing, literature demands our active interpretation—both of its content and form—and makes that task at once arduous and, for all that, pleasurable. In this course, we will acquire and hone our critical interpretive skills, and deepen our experience of reading. Together we will explore some phenomenal literary works: turn them this way and that, examine them from multiple sides, over and over, to see not just what each says, but how. In other words, we will practice reading actively, critically, and deeply, with a deliberate curiosity about literary form, within a range of genres (poetry, fiction, drama, the essay, etc.) and traditions. We will develop our critical vocabularies, explore different interpretive approaches, and produce our own individual and collective interpretations, sometimes in dialogue with established literary scholarship. Authors may range from John Donne to Sylvia Plath, Sophocles to F. Scott Fitzgerald and Henry James. This course is the gateway to the English major, and excellent for anyone interested in literature. Assignments will include multiple revised essays, a mini-teaching exercise and a final exam. Be prepared to immerse yourself in literature!

Prerequisite: one 100-level literature class or comparable first-year seminar or by permission.
ENGLISH 212-01 MW 1:00-2:20

Fiction HL

David Fite
In this course we will read a variety of novels from the 19th and 20th centuries, including novels by Gustave Flaubert, Kate Chopin, F. Scott Fitzgerald, William Faulkner, Nathanael West, Thomas Pynchon, and Toni Morrison. We will address the topics of romance and realism, modernism and post-modernism, and magical realism in the novel.
ENGLISH 213-02 MW 2:30-3:50

Drama HL

Nancy Carrick
As Tolstoy tells us, “All happy families are like one another; each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.” We will read plays in which unruly love challenges families and the communities they comprise. From Agamemnon and Clytemnestra to Kate and Petruchio, from Nora and Torvald to Stella and Stanley, we will explore the consequences of passion as depicted on the stage. We will read Greek tragedy and modern comedy, Shakespeare and Williams, and view a few contemporary films. As each work invites you into its world and the perspectives of the time in which it was written, we will discover both the traditions of tragedy and comedy and innovations in the forms. We will read, discuss, debate, perform, and write.
ENGLISH 221-01 TTH 2:30-3:50

Shakespeare to 1600

Fulfills pre-1800 requirement

Nancy Carrick
With attention to Shakespeare's times, his linguistic and literary tradition, and his stage, English 221 will focus on selected sonnets and early plays, likely including Taming of the Shrew, A Midsummer Night's Dream, and Richard II. Informal writing and research, watching live performance, an exam, and performances will offer a variety of ways to encounter Shakespeare's work.
ENGLISH 233-01 MW 9:30-10:50

African-American Literature DD, HL

Cross-listed with Race and Ethnic Studies

Sheila Lloyd
In this course, we will use Karen E. Fields and Barbara J. Fields’s 2012 book Racecraft and Ta-Nehisi Coates’s 2015 book Between the World and Me to guide us through our study of prose fiction and nonfiction by African-American writers working between 1845-1996. Spanning a sesquicentennial, these writers’ texts reveal at least two things about the United States: the persistence of the social fiction of race and the many acts of resistance against this fiction. In our time together, we will consider how the texts of the past inform our current cultural and social sensibilities when it comes to the dynamics of race and racism as well as their reinforcement of other forms of identity and inequalities whether defined in terms of nation, gender, economic status, sexuality, and/or disability. We will see how writers deploy the rich resources of literature to imagine the world otherwise and to imagine other possibilities for the human. In addition to Fields and Fields and Coates, the writers we will read include Frederick Douglass, W. E. B. Du Bois, Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, Nella Larsen, and Toni Morrison. Assignments will include two formal essays, a take-home midterm, facilitating class discussion, and a final.

ENGLISH 237-01 TTH 9:30-10:50

Immigrant Literature HL

Coming to America: Immigration, Race and Ethnicity in American Literature

Cross-listed with Race and Ethnic Studies

Sharon Oster


Have immigrants to the US succeeded “on the backs of blacks,” to quote Toni Morrison? In this course, we will explore key literary texts of twentieth-century immigrant experience together with theories of ethnicity, race and whiteness. Our principal goal will be to explore the relationship between the stories we tell about US immigration and the black/white “color line”—to invoke W.E.B. DuBois’s famous formulation – that has defined the American racial imaginary for centuries. We will examine the extent to which literary authors depicting experiences of becoming American rely upon this entrenched black/white racial “logic,” challenge it, or struggle to find other ways of articulating Americanness, that are not racially-inflected. We will also explore related questions: many of these texts are bilingual; how does language shape immigrant narratives? What about gender and sexual differences, particularly across perceived racial and cultural lines? Generational difference? To what extent is the law—US immigration law—central to these narratives? Authors may include Abraham Cahan, Mary Antin, Zora Neale Hurston, Ralph Ellison, Richard Rodriguez, Julia Alvarez, Maxine Hong Kingston or Gene Luen Yang, and films like Hester Street, El Norte, Better Luck Tomorrow, or The Visitor. I am open to other text and film suggestions if there is something you are dying to read in this field. Expect a lot of reading. Grading will be based on participation, one short and one longer final literary interpretive essay, frequent short papers, and a class presentation.
ENGLISH 250-01 MW 11:00-12:20

Theories of Popular Culture WA

Cross-listed with Race and Ethnic Studies, Visual and Media Studies,

and Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Priya Jha
In the 21st century, our existence is marked by constant flows of messages disseminated globally via various media forms and of the ease of travel by people all over the world. These movements have led to deep transformations in the ways we see ourselves as observers and participators of/in culture, at both the local and global levels. Moreover, these shifts have led to a compression of time and space in a way that would not have been possible even fifty years ago. Thus, our interpretive models have also had to change in accordance with these transformations. Our main goal this semester will be to develop critical frameworks which we can then apply to analyzing and (re)defining identities. Our focus will be on popular culture and mundane everyday cultural practices with which we engage, from walking to watching youtube to food to television and film. Our approach will be interdisciplinary, both in theory and in practice – spanning fields as diverse as literature, film studies, feminist studies, critical race theories, postcolonial theory, anthropology and sociology. Complementing our fieldwork will be some of the key figures who have contributed to cultural studies such as Raymond Williams, Clifford Geertz, Angela McRobbie, Stuart Hall, Antonio Gramsci, Arjun Appadurai, Walter Benjamin, Laura Mulvey, Anne McClintock, and Louis Althusser. While we will not be able to map out all of the issues and subjects that currently occupy the attention of cultural studies scholars, we will give detailed attention to some of the most important of these. Interspersed in this work will be discussions of methods and methodologies in writing about culture. In-class work includes short writing assignments, presentations, and an interdisciplinary final project, the topic of which will be collaborative.
ENGLISH 308-01 MW 2:30-3:50

Mentoring College Writers

Bridgette Callahan
Introduction to Writing Studies and the theory and practice of mentoring college writers. Course includes applied practice in group and individual tutoring.

Prerequisite: Completion of the WA requirement.
ENGLISH 322-01 MWF 11:30-12:50

The Eighteenth Century

Cross-listed with Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies

Fulfills pre-1800 requirement

Heather King
The 18th century was long viewed as a monolithic and logical era – the Age of Reason. However, the century has several other possible titles: the Age of Sensibility, the Age of Satire, the Age of Taste, the Age of Shopping, the Age of the Heroic Couplet, the Age of the Dirty Joke, and more. From the Restoration of King Charles the II in 1688 to the tumult of the French Revolution, the century traces seismic shifts in how people viewed themselves, laying the ground work for modernity. This course will sample widely the humor and pathos, the satire and idealism, expressed in eighteenth-century literary forms like formal verse satire, the novel, the periodic essay, and some of the best comedies ever written for the stage. The visual tradition will be represented by Hogarth’s Progresses, and we’ll take advantage of film whenever we can. Course work will consist of spirited discussions, written argumentation, cultural experiments, and historical research to be conducted in Armacost Library. We will pay special attention to debates about commerce, gender roles, literary history, and anything else that strikes our fancy.
ENGLISH 331-01 TTH 11:30-12:50

American Literature: Industry and Enterprise

Coming of Age in the Gilded Age”



Sharon Oster
The post-Bellum era of American literature has given us the “rags-to-riches” plot we continue to cherish. It was the era of “get-rich-quick” schemes and the rise of the new millionaires. But late 19th-century literature also reveals the limits of this ideal of social mobility, and the dangers of its perpetuation, given the stringent racial, gender, class and cultural confines of the era. Mark Twain dubbed it the “Gilded Age,” the “era of incredible rottenness,” marked by great prosperity and awful poverty; imperial ambition and entrepreneurialism; Reconstruction and massive immigration; corporate capitalism and political scandal; urban growth; religious and political crises; economic opportunities and social restrictions; and, above all, a rapidly expanding literary market with new technologies to accommodate these new realities. What was it like to come of age in this era of racial, economic and social instability? As the nation was undergoing its own modern rebirth after the Civil War, so was the concept of what it meant to be American. These debates were nowhere more important than in literature of the immediate post-Bellum decades, as novelists grappled and fictionally experimented with the changing values, social rules, and competing definitions of “Americanness.” In this seminar, we will read a series of novels published across a fifty-year period, specifically in the subgenre of the Bildungsroman, the novel of education and culture, to explore: shifting conceptions of individual success and decline; intersections among race, gender, class and American identity; narratives of socialization, resistance, and even trenchant critique of American culture and its ideals. Along the way, you will sharpen your reading, writing, research, interpretive analysis, oral presentation and critical thinking skills.
ENGLISH 351-01 MW 1:00-2:20

Postcolonial, Global and Transnational Literatures: DD, HL, M3



Disease, Hygiene, and the Colonial Imaginary

Cross-listed with Biology, Race and Ethnic Studies,

and Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Priya Jha and Ben Aronson, Biology


From the “first contact” to the contemporary period, images of disease, filth, and cleanliness have been used as metaphors in literature and other cultural forms to justify colonialism on the part of the colonizers and to reinforce the barriers between the Subject and the Other. In reality, however, heretofore unknown diseases were also introduced upon the native populations. Further, images of the “dirtiness” of the natives went hand-in-hand with the images of the colonies as diseased. These images, it can be argued, continue to haunt our understanding of other cultures and inform contemporary concerns over biological warfare and the (newer) proliferation of AIDS in the third world, for example. At the same time, a feminist analysis demonstrates that the metaphor of disease applied to gendered subjects in Empire came to bear negatively not only upon women, but upon the colonies themselves, insofar as the colonies were themselves gendered as “feminine.” This course explores these themes in various forms of medical, bio-political, literary and popular cultures – literature, film, social medicine history, medicine and policy, historical documents, and material culture to name but a few. We will cluster around three, perhaps four issues relating to medicine, public health, and empire. We will be attentive to how particular diseases or notions of cleanliness took particular forms during colonial contact – through implementation of particular state policies and treatment of colonial subjects.

ENGLISH 402-01 TTH 9:30-10:50

History of Literary Criticism and Theory

Anne Cavender
This course will introduce you to European literary theory from the ancient Greeks up until the early part of the twentieth century. It’s a savory alphabet soup (Aristotle, Augustine, Arnold; Boccaccio, Burke; Coleridge, Eliot, etc. on to Sidney, Schiller, Shelley, Vico, Wilde, Woolf, Wollstonecraft and Yeats) brimming with arguments about what exactly literature is and why literature is important, visionary, frivolous, or dangerous. As we study these different approaches, we will become aware of our own preconceived notions of literature’s definition, use, and proper handling. Who is lurking inside your brain? Plato, Wordsworth, Locke? Come and find out! The wonderful part of studying early literary theory is that many of these theorists were also poets, playwrights, and novelists, so creative writing majors will find sympathetic company here.

Prerequisite: junior standing or by permission.
ENGLISH 420-01 TTH 1:00-2:20

Senior Seminar in Literature WB

Judith Tschann
This capstone course gives students the opportunity to reflect on and synthesize their work in the major, by compiling a portfolio of representative work, including a reflective narrative; critiquing the work of others in the seminar; teaching a literary or theoretical work; and writing a substantial research-supported essay.

Prerequisite: senior standing recommended.

FALL 2016

Courses taught by English Faculty

in other departments

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES 215-01 TTH 8:00-9:20

Environmental Literature HL, WB

Cross-listed with English

Anne Cavender
In this course we will study literary texts that explore environmental issues. First, we will read a range of British and American writers such as William Wordsworth, Gerard Manley Hopkins, Henry David Thoreau, Ralph Waldo Emerson and Walt Whitman. Many 20th century and contemporary American environmental writers are heavily influenced by non-Western philosophical and religious traditions, particularly Chinese Daoist and Buddhist texts that offer alternative theories of the relationship between humans and other beings. We will study some ancient texts from those Chinese traditions as a bridge into understanding contemporary environmental writers like Gary Snyder, Barry Lopez and Mary Oliver.

NOTE: To receive WB credit for this class, students must have full junior standing.


JOHNSTON SEMINAR, JNST 000J-01 WF 9:30-10:50

Latin Tutorials

Judith Tschann
For some of you, this tutorial will be an intensive beginning Latin class. By the end of the semester, you will have a firm grasp of basic grammar (of Latin and of English), a developing sense of the joys and challenges of translating, a bigger vocabulary, and at least a budding interest in Roman literature and history.
If you have already studied Latin, we will negotiate an appropriate program of study, including review of grammar and focusing perhaps (as some did last year) on Ovid’s tales.
Everyone is welcome.

BIOGRAPHIES
BRIDGETTE CALLAHAN
I’ve been teaching writing at the University of Redlands for three years, but my experiences also include working as both a T.A. and a writing tutor at Cal State San Bernardino, as well as teaching abroad in Korea in 2013, working with high school writers in 2014, and teaching aboard a Navy aircraft carrier in 2015. I learn something new about teaching everywhere and every time I teach, and each previous experience, I hope, brings new life and new knowledge to my teaching. I look forward to teaching Mentoring College Writers and to sharing my experiences of working with student writers.
ANNE CAVENDER
Anne Cavender studies and teaches classical Chinese poetry, British and American modernism, and cross-cultural poetics, particularly the relationship between literature and ethics in the Chinese and Western traditions. Many of her classes will be cross-listed with Asian Studies and can be taken for credit under either major.
NANCY CARRICK
Nancy teaches Shakespeare, Milton, and drama in its many guises. She is especially interested in the interdisciplinary study of dramatic images on stage and in book illustration, in classical texts and vase painting, and in the interaction of text and performance.
DAVID FITE
David Fite has taught a wide range of courses on the undergraduate level, including American literature, fiction, and composition and rhetoric. He is the author of a book, Harold Bloom: The Rhetoric of Romantic Vision, and of numerous articles on literary theory and modern poetics.
CLAUDIA INGRAM
Years ago I was a lawyer, and I’m still interested in that discourse. Now I’m drawn to the ways poems and novels complicate things.
PRIYA JHA
As of late, I have taken to a new, and very expensive hobby: globe-trotting. The love I have always had of reading novels from and about places and people far and farther, of watching films about the same, and listening to their music has now found a different kind of home in my travels in the globalized world of the 21st century. The intersections of passions, imaginations, cultural productions like food and music as well as divergences from the same breathe new life into my classes and in my own critical practices. I get excited to hear about adventures – of the mind and of the body – that my students take and how they are able to synthesize it with their intellectual life at Redlands.
HEATHER KING
Born in Claremont, CA, I come back to the area by way of Boston University (BA) and the University of Wisconsin (Ph.D.), now recreating a sunny Southern California childhood for my two sons. My research on 18th century British writers has convinced me that discussions of literature should always be both rigorous and a bit irreverent. My particular interests center on women’s writing and questions of morality, but don’t let that mislead you -- whatever the genre, whatever the time period, I'm determined to find the meaning and the merriment in the text.
SHEILA LLOYD
Sheila Lloyd teaches courses on nineteenth- and twentieth-century African-diasporic literatures and on American literature from the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries; specific courses include “War in Literature and Film,” “James Baldwin,” “The Dark Side of Innocence,” “American Industry and Enterprise,” “Film and Literature,” and “Introduction to Film.” Her most recent research projects include a study on neoliberalism, desire, and fantasy in African-American literature and film.
SHARON OSTER
My scholarship focuses on late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century American literary realism, religion and the novel, and Jewish literature, as well as literature of the Holocaust. I am also interested in spatial and digital approaches to literature. I teach a range of courses in nineteenth- and twentieth-century American literature, like "Coming of Age in the Gilded Age"; "Holocaust Memoirs: Reading, Writing, Mapping"; "Immigrant Literature"; "American Jewish Literature"; "Autobiography and Graphic Narrative"; “History of Literary Criticism and Theory”; and occasionally courses on satire, time travel, or on the 1960s.
JUDITH TSCHANN
Judy Tschann teaches a variety of courses in literature and language, including Chaucer, Shakespeare, History of English, Linguistics, and History of Literary Criticism and Theory.



5/18/16

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