Expansión hacia el Oeste



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Grade 5cscope_logo_r

Social Studies

Unit: 08

Lesson: 01



Suggested Duration: 10 days
Expansión hacia el Oeste

Lesson Synopsis:

Students learn about the political, economic, and geographic regional differences that led to conflict in the United States through map sketches, primary sources, problem-solving and points of view.




TEKS:




5.4

History. The student understands political, economic, and social changes that occurred in the United States during the 19th century. The student is expected to:




5.4A

Describe the causes and effects of the War of 1812.




5.4B

Identify and explain how changes resulting from the Industrial Revolution led to conflict among sections of the United States.




5.4C

Identify reasons people moved west.




5.4D

Identify significant events and concepts associated with U.S. territorial expansion, including the Louisiana Purchase, the expedition of Lewis and Clark, and Manifest Destiny.




5.4F

Explain how industry and the mechanization of agriculture changed the American way of life.




5.6

Geography. The student uses geographic tools to collect, analyze, and interpret data. The student is expected to:




5.6A

Apply geographic tools, including grid systems, legends, symbols, scales, and compass roses, to construct and interpret map.




5.6B

Translate geographic data into a variety of formats such as raw data to graphs and maps.




5.7

Geography. The student understands the concept of regions in the United States. The student is expected to:




5.7A

Describe a variety of regions in the United States such as political, population, and economic regions that result from patterns of human activity.




5.7B

Describe a variety of regions in the United States such as landform, climate, and vegetation regions that result from physical characteristics, such as the Great Plains, Rocky Mountains, and Coastal Plains.




5.7C

Locate on a map important political features, such as ten of the largest urban areas in the United States, the fifty states and their capitals, and regions such as the Northeast, the Midwest, and the Southwest.




5.7D

Locate on a map important physical features, such as the Rocky Mountains, Mississippi River, and Great Plains.




5.9

Geography. The student understands how people adapt to and modify their environment.




5.9A

Describe how and why people have adapted to and modified their environment in the United States, past and present, such as the use of human resources to meet basic needs.




5.9B

Analyze the positive and negative consequences of human modification of the environment in the United States, past and present.




5.13

Economics. The student understands patterns of work and economic activities in the United States. The student is expected to:




5.13A

Compare how people in different parts of the United States earn a living, past and present.




5.13B

Identify and explain how geographic factors have influenced the location of economic activities in the United States.




5.21

Culture. The student understands the relationship between the arts and the times during which they were created. The student is expected to:




5.21A

Identify significant examples of art, music, and literature from various periods in U.S. history, such as the painting American Progress, “Yankee Doodle,” and “Paul Revere’s Ride.”







Social Studies Skills TEKS:




5.24

Social studies skills. The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired from a variety of sources including electronic technology. The student is expected to:




5.24C

Organize and interpret information in outlines, reports, databases, and visuals including graphs, charts, timelines, and maps.




5.25

Social studies skills. The student communicates in written, oral, and visual forms. The student is expected to:




5.25D

Create written and visual material such as journal entries, reports, graphic organizers, outlines, and bibliographies.




5.25E

Use standard grammar, spelling, sentence structure, and punctuation.




5.26

Social studies skills. The student uses problem-solving and decision-making skills, working independently and with others, in a variety of settings. The student is expected to:




5.26A

Use a problem-solving process to identify a problem, gather information, list and consider options, consider advantages and disadvantages, choose and implement a solution, and evaluate the effectiveness of the solution.


Getting Ready for Instruction

Performance Indicator(s):

  • Design a board game based on the settlement of the West. Include geographic factors; regions, states, and territories; economic opportunities; political challenges; and interactions with American Indian groups. (5.4B; 5.7B; 5.13B; 5.25A; 5.26A)

4elps icon 1C, 1E

Key Understandings and Guiding Questions:

  • Factores políticos, económicos, sociales y geográficos motivan a la gente a emigrar.

  • ¿De qué manera los cambios generados por la Revolución Industrial derivaron en un conflicto entre sectores de los Estados Unidos?

  • ¿Qué eventos y conceptos relevantes se relacionan con la expansión de Estados Unidos hacia el Oeste?

  • ¿De qué manera la industria y la mecanización de la agricultura cambiaron el estilo de vida norteamericano?

  • ¿Cómo y por qué la gente se ha adaptado y a la vez ha modificado, el medio ambiente en los Estados Unidos, en el pasado y en el presente?

  • ¿De qué manera los factores geográficos han influido en la ubicación de actividades económicas en los Estados Unidos?

  • ¿Cuáles son ejemplos de arte, música y literatura de varios periodos en la historia de Estados Unidos?




Vocabulary of Instruction: (no caps unless proper noun)

  • arancel

  • Destino manifiesto

  • expansión territorial

  • región

  • revolución




Materials:

  • Refer to Notes for Teacher section for materials.


(appropriate materials may be substituted as needed to incorporate district resources and availability)


Attachments:

  • Teacher Resource: Manifest Destiny (1 for projection)

  • Handout: Political, Economic, Geographic and Social Reasons for Migrating West (1 per student)

  • Teacher Resource: Political, Economic, Geographic and Social Reasons for Migrating West Key (1)

  • Handout: PEGS Chart (1 per student)

  • Teacher Resource: Regions of the United States Map (1 for projection, optional)

  • Handout: Regions and Characteristics Chart (1 per student)

  • Handout: The First Industrial Revolution (1 per student)

  • Handout: The Industrial Revolution: Causes and Effects (1 per student)

  • Handout: Steps in the Problem Solving Process (1 per group)

  • Handout: Farming Gets a Boost (1 per student)

  • Handout: Learning Station Questions (1 per student)

  • Handout: Learning Station 1 - Andrew Jackson The Hero (3 per folder)

  • Handout: Learning Station 2 - Compare Contrast the Inaugurations (3 per folder)

  • Handout: Learning Station 3 - Greedy for Gold (3 per folder)

  • Handout: Learning Station 4 - Spoils System (3 per folder)

  • Handout: Learning Station 5 - Cartoon President Jackson (3 per folder)

  • Handout: The Point of View of the North (1 per student)

  • Handout: The Point of View of the South (1 per student)

  • Handout: The Point of View of the West (1 per student)

  • Teacher Resource: Songs From the North, The Erie Canal Song

  • Teacher Resource: Songs From the South

  • Teacher Resource: Songs From the West

  • Handout: Research on American Indian Conflict (1 per group)




Resources and References:

  • None indicated

Advance Preparation:

  1. Become familiar with content and procedures for the lesson.

  2. Refer to the Instructional Focus Document for specific content to include in the lesson.

  3. Select appropriate sections of the textbook and other classroom materials that support the learning for this lesson.

  4. Preview materials and websites according to district guidelines.

  5. Prepare materials and handouts as necessary

  6. Locate and download a line map of the United States of America, write the regions on it from lesson 3 and make one copy for each student.




Background Information:

Westward expansion affected the political, economic, and physical aspects of the United States as the American spirit and concept of Manifest Destiny encouraged many to seek new opportunities in newly acquired territories. Along with the rapid growth, old and new issues about the spread of slavery and sectionalism divided the country on many fronts. These issues would cause a divide that eventually led to a conflict that tore the country apart. With the acquisition of the Louisiana Purchase and the end of the War of 1812, worldwide politics changed. Britain and France were no longer at war, the Americans had defeated the British at New Orleans, and there seemed to be no limits on America’s destiny.


Getting Ready for Instruction Supplemental Planning Document

Instructors are encouraged to supplement and substitute resources, materials, and activities to differentiate instruction to address the needs of learners. The Exemplar Lessons are one approach to teaching and reaching the Performance Indicators and Specificity in the Instructional Focus Document for this unit. Instructors are encouraged to create original lessons using the Content Creator in the Tools Tab located at the top of the page. All originally authored lessons can be saved in the “My CSCOPE” Tab within the “My Content” area.

Instructional Procedures




Instructional Procedures

Notes for Teacher

ENGAGEAnalyzing a painting

NOTE: 1 Day = 50 minutes

Suggested Day 1 – 15 minutes

  1. Project a copy of the painting American Progress by John Gast from the Teacher Resource: Manifest Destiny (1 for projection)




  1. Students observe the painting and write two to three inference statements.




  1. Use a large map of the United States to demonstrate and explain that Americans wanted the land from the Atlantic to the Pacific oceans.




  1. Read the information found on the Teacher Resource: Manifest Destiny orally to students.




  1. Facilitate a discussion about westward expansion using a T chart to categorize possible benefits and challenges.

Benefits (to whom?) Challenges (to whom?)




Materials:

  • large map of the United States


Attachments:

  • Teacher Resource: Manifest Destiny (1 for projection)


Purpose:

  • Students are introduced to the idea of westward expansion.


TEKS: 5.4C; 5.4D; 5.21A; 5.24C


EXPLOREMigration

Suggested Day 1 (continued) – 15 minutes

  1. Organize students into groups of 4.




  1. Distribute to each group the Handout: Political, Economic, Geographic and Social Reasons for Migrating West (1 per student)




  1. Discuss the “Push Pull” factors of migration.

  • “Push” factors focus on the more negative elements of life where people currently live. For example, industrialization in the east led to overcrowding in the cities and fewer jobs once the Civil War veterans returned home. This “pushed” people in the east to head west for more room and more economic opportunities.

  • “Pull” factors focus on elements of life in another place that are appealing. For example, the availability of cheap land lured people from the eastern cities to go west.




  1. Discuss settlement patterns by comparing today’s rainfall map and a population map to demonstrate that people are most likely to live by a water source or transportation routes such as highways and airports.




  1. Continue the student discussion by asking questions such as:

  • What significant events and concepts are associated with U.S. westward expansion?




  1. In their groups, students write a list of reasons for migration and decide if they are push or pull factors.




  1. Guide students with probing questions about why people were migrating west: economic opportunities (land, gold) or the adventure of living in the new territories, or to get away from debt or problems where they live now, or because they believed in manifest destiny. Did they have roads and highways to follow?




  1. Script reasons on the board.




  1. Students complete the Handout: Political, Economic, Geographic and Social Reasons for Migrating West (1 per student).




  1. The teacher may evaluate or provide feedback to student responses using the Teacher Resource: Political, Economic, Geographic and Social Reasons for Migrating West KEY.




Materials:

  • current rainfall map

  • population map


Attachments:

  • Handout: Political, Economic, Geographic and Social Reasons for Migrating West (1 per student)

  • Teacher Resource: Political, Economic, Geographic and Social Reasons for Migrating West KEY


TEKS: 5.4C; 5.4D; 5.24C
Instructional Note:

  • Provide students with an explanation about push and pull factors.

  • Provide students with an explanation about settlement patterns.




EXPLAINPolitical, Economic, Geographic and Social Factors

Suggested Day 1 (continued) – 20 minutes

  1. Distribute the Handout: PEGS Chart (1 per student)




  1. In groups of four, students categorize reasons for migrating as political, economic, geographic, or social and proceed to fill out the Handout: PEGS Chart accordingly.




  1. Students discuss answers with group members and make changes and additions to their chart if necessary.




Attachments:

  • Handout: PEGS Chart (1 per student)


TEKS: 5.4C; 5.4D; 5.24C


EXPLOREIdentify, Locate, Sketch and Label

Suggested Day 2 – 35 minutes

  1. Using a map of the United States that has a grid system, a legend, symbols, and a compass rose, students locate the following geographic regions on the map:

  • Appalachian Mountains

  • Rocky Mountains

  • Cascades

  • Great Plains

  • Coastal Plains

  • Mississippi River Valley

  • Mississippi River

  • Hudson River

  • Columbia River

  • Potomac River

  • Missouri River

  • The Great Lakes




  1. Using a large map of the United States, grid systems, legends, symbols, and a compass rose, have students identify the following on the map:

  • Washington, D.C.

  • Names of states

  • State capitals

  • 5 National parks

  • Neighboring countries and boundaries




  1. Using a large map of the United States, grid systems, legends, symbols, and compass rose, have students identify the following population regions on the map:

  • 10 largest cities

  • Metropolitan areas

  • Rural regions




  1. After students locate and identify the regions, places, and physical features from numbers 1, 2, and 3, students sketch a map of the United States on butcher paper or chart paper and label the regions, places and physical features listed above.




Materials:

  • map of the United States with geographic regions, landforms, climate, vegetation, significant cities, parks, neighboring countries, etc.

  • colored pencils

  • pencils

  • butcher paper or chart paper


TEKS: 5.6A; 5.7A; 5.7B; 5.7C; 5.7D; 5.24C


EXPLAINSummarize

Suggested Day 2 (continued) – 15 minutes

  1. Students create a bar graph using information from a map and other resources illustrating the 10 largest cities in the U.S. based on their population.




  1. Students write two to three sentences that summarize the many features of the U.S.




Purpose:

  • Students translate geographic data into a graph.


TEKS: 5.6B; 5.24C
Instructional Note:

  • Summaries may be written as a homework assignment if there is insufficient time to complete the assignment.

  • Maps may be sketched as a group activity instead of individual students.




EXPLORERegions of the United States

Suggested Day 3 – 20 minutes

  1. Divide the class into 11 groups.




  1. Assign each group a different territorial region of the United States.

  • Regions:

  • Northeast

  • Mideast

  • Southeast

  • Midwest

  • Great Plains

  • South

  • Southwest

  • West Coast

  • Northwest

  • Alaska

  • Hawaii




  1. Show the Teacher Resource: Regions of the United States Map (1 for projection, optional) and point out the regions.




  1. Student groups research their assigned region using maps, textbooks, and district-approved websites to discover the following:

  • Climate

  • Vegetation

  • Economic activities

  • Recreation

  • Living standards

  • Rivers, roads, landforms

  • Landmarks and places of interest




  1. Students record their information on graphic organizer poste using char paper or butcher paper. Students record notes and add quick illustrations for each category.




Materials:

  • Chart paper or butcher paper

  • Markers


Attachments:

  • Teacher Resource: Regions of the United States Map (1 for projection, optional)


Purpose:

  • Students learn about the regions of the U.S.


TEKS: 5.6A; 5.7A, 5.7B, 5.7C, 5.7D; 5.24C
Instructional Note

  • Students may use the graphic organizer below to display their discoveries, or they may create a graphic organizer on their own.






EXPLAINRegions of the United States

Suggested Day 3 (continued) – 25 minutes

  1. Teacher provides students with a copy of a line map of the United States with the regions already marked on it.




  1. Each group presents their graphic organizer poster to the class.




  1. Before the presentation, students point out the region on the map of the United States.




  1. While each group presents their assigned region, the class takes notes about each region by writing the information being presented on the Handout: Regions and Characteristics Chart (1 per student).




  1. Display completed graphic organizer posters on a bulletin board.




Materials:

  • U.S. map with regions


Attachments:

  • Handout: Regions and Characteristics Chart (1 per student)


TEKS: 5.6A; 5.7A; 5.7B; 5.7C; 5.7D; 5.24C
Instructional Note:

  • Drawing pictures of the region onto the Regions and Characteristics chart helps students to remember details.




ELABORATEExit Card

Suggested Day 3 (continued) – 5 minutes

  1. When presentations are completed, ask students what they remember about the War of 1812 from the previous unit.




  1. Ask students to “turn and talk” to a neighbor to discuss which areas of the map were most affected by this war.




  1. Students write an “Exit Card” stating one or two predictions about the areas that will likely encounter conflict during the next era (1820-1850) especially with the American Indian tribes.




TEKS: 5.4A; 5.24C


EXPLOREIndustrial Revolution

Suggested Day 4 – 25 minutes

  1. Assign each student a partner.




  1. Distribute the following:

  • Handout: The First Industrial Revolution (1 per student)

  • Handout: The Industrial Revolution: Causes and Effects (1 per student)




  1. Students “buddy read” read the handout: The First Industrial Revolution (1 per student).




  1. Pairs work collaboratively to complete the Handout: The Industrial Revolution: Causes and Effects (1 per student) noting three inventions and both the positive and negative effects of that invention.




  1. Ask:

  • How did the changes resulting from the Industrial Revolution lead to conflict among sections of the United States?




Attachments:

  • Handout: The First Industrial Revolution (1 per student)

  • Handout: The Industrial Revolution: Causes and Effects (1 per student)


Purpose:

  • Students learn about the industrial revolution.


TEKS: 5.4B, 5.4D, 5.4F
Instructional Note:

  • When students “buddy read,” they partner with another student, and using a quiet voice, take turns reading to each other.

  • The teacher may provide books about the Industrial Revolution for students to read.




EXPLAINToss a Question X 3

Suggested Day 4 (continued) – 10 minutes

  1. Arrange students in a circle for Toss a Question X 3.

  • Round One:

  1. Toss the ball to a student and then ask a question. (See questions below).

  2. The first student catches the ball and says, “I think the answer has something to do with ____________” and then tosses the ball to another student in the circle. This student sits down.

  3. The second student catches the ball and repeats what student #1 said and ADDS one more idea: “I think the answer has something to do with _____________________ and __________________.” Then he tosses the ball to a third student. This student sits down.

  4. The third student must answer the question fully and then toss the ball back to the teacher. If the student does not know the answer, he may toss the ball back to the teacher and say, “I would like to hear from our teacher on this issue.” This student sits down.

  5. Teacher clarifies/verifies responses.

  • Round Two: Repeat step #1 – 5 above for each question below, ensuring that all students are included in the ball toss.




  1. Toss a Question – Questions:

  • What political, economic, geographic, or social reasons motivated people to move west?

  • How did the Industrial Revolution lead to people moving west?

  • How did the Industrial Revolution lead to conflict between the north and the south?

  • How did inventions like the cotton gin and other mechanical advances in agriculture change the American way of life?

  • What did the Louisiana Purchase have to do with people wanting to move west?

  • What is Manifest Destiny?

  • What can you tell me about main places people settled as they moved west?

  • How does the geography of an area affect if people settle there or not?

  • How do regions of the U.S. differ from one another?

  • What political, economic, geographic, or social reasons motivated people to move west?




Materials:

  • Small ball or bean bag


TEKS: 5.4B; 5.4D; 5.4F; 5.24C; 5.25D
Instructional Note:

  • Model for students what “tossing” a ball looks like (soft, underhanded toss). Ensure that all students are included in the ball toss and that no one is left out. Once students answer a question, they sit down, and students can no longer throw to them. However, to ensure everyone continues to be engaged, the TEACHER may throw the ball to someone sitting down, so everyone is still eligible to answer a question.

  • Many of the answers to the “Toss A Question” questions may be found in the specificity on the IFD.




ELABORATEProblem-Solve

Suggested Day 4 (continued) – 15 minutes

  1. Using the Handout: Steps in the Problem Solving Process (1 per group), students brainstorm, in groups of four, possible solutions to the problems the Industrial Revolution created.




Attachments:

  • Handout: Steps in the Problem Solving Process (1 per group)


TEKS: 5.26A


EXPLOREInnovations and Inventions

Suggested Day 5 – 25 minutes

  1. Ask students to think of machines we have today that make a difficult task much easier. (Suggestions might include the car, dishwasher, vacuum cleaner, tractor, etc.)

  • Ask: Did people have these machines in the early 1800s?




  1. Students read the Handout: Farming Gets a Boost (1 per student) and discuss what they learned.




  1. Start a class list of the innovations and inventions of the time.




Attachments:

  • Handout: Farming Gets a Boost (1 per student)


TEKS: 5.4B; 5.4D; 5.4F; 5.24C


EXPLAINInnovations and Inventions

Suggested Day 5 (continued) – 25 minutes

  1. Organize students into groups of 3 or 4.




  1. Using the list of inventions created in the previous Explore activity, assign each group one invention.




  1. Groups draw a picture of the invention and write an explanation of the value of the invention, as well as any negative effect the invention may have had.




  1. Students create a class museum about the Industrial Revolution.




TEKS: 5.4B; 5.4D; 5.4F; 5.24C
Instructional Note:

  • Inventions studied: cotton gin, canals, steam engine, railroads, steel plow, mechanical reaper and others as added by the teacher.

EXPLORE/ EXPLAINLearning Stations – Indian Removal Act

Suggested Day 6 – 50 minutes

  1. Distribute the Handout: Learning Station Questions (1 per student)




  1. Divide students into 5 groups.




  1. Set up 5 Learning Stations around the classroom.




  1. Each Learning Station should have a folder, with the appropriate materials:

  • Handout: Learning Station 1 - Andrew Jackson The Hero (3 per folder)

  • Handout: Learning Station 2 - Compare Contrast the Inaugurations (3 per folder)

  • Handout: Learning Station 3 - Greedy for Gold (3 per folder)

  • Handout: Learning Station 4 - Spoils System (3 per folder)

  • Handout: Learning Station 5 - Cartoon President Jackson (3 per folder)




  1. Send each group to a Learning Station.




  1. Explain that group members will share the materials in the folder, read the content and study the pictures.




  1. Students answer the reflection questions on the Handout: Learning Station Questions.




  1. The teacher will have a signal to indicate when groups should rotate to the next station.




  1. After each group has explored each station, groups collaborate to answer the final Summary questions on the Handout: Learning Station Questions.




  1. At the end of the class, the teacher moves students back to the big ideas associated with westward expansion and the removal of the Indians.

Ask:

  • How did westward expansion, the gold rush, and the Industrial Revolution impact the American Indians?




Attachments:

  • Handout: Learning Station Questions (1 per student)

  • Handout: Learning Station 1 - Andrew Jackson The Hero (3 per folder)

  • Handout: Learning Station 2 - Compare Contrast the Inaugurations (3 per folder)

  • Handout: Learning Station 3 - Greedy for Gold (3 per folder)

  • Handout: Learning Station 4 - Spoils System (3 per folder)

  • Handout: Learning Station 5 - Cartoon President Jackson (3 per folder)


TEKS: 5.4B, 5.4C; 5.7A; 5.9A; 5.21A; 5.24C; 5.25D
Instructional Note:

  • The teacher should facilitate the Learning Stations, answering questions, clarifying expectations, and keeping students on task.




EXPLORE/EXPLAINNorth, South, West Jigsaw

Suggested Day 7 – 20 minutes

  1. Initiate a discussion about “regional loyalty” with students. (Choose relevant topics that students might relate to.)




  1. Students number off 1-2-3.

  • 1’s: Distribute the Handout: Point of View of the North (1 per group member)

  • 2’s: Distribute the Handout: Point of View of the South (1 per group member)

  • 3’s: Distribute the Handout: Point of View of the West (1 per group member)




  1. Students read their assigned handouts and summarize each the passage by collaborating with their group to write down the 5 major points of the passage.




  1. The teacher mixes students so that a 1 – 2 – 3 form a group.




  1. The 1’s teach the 2 and 3 in the group about the North, noting the 5 big ideas or major points.




  1. The 2’s teach the 1 and 3 in the group about the south, noting the 5 big ideas or major points.




  1. The 3’s teach the 1 and 2 in the group about the West, noting the 5 big ideas or major points.




Attachments:

  • Handout: Point of View of the North (1 per student)

  • Handout: Point of View of the South (1 per student)

  • Handout: Point of View of the West (1 per student)


TEKS: 5.4B; 5.4C; 5.4F; 5.7A; 5.9A; 5.13A; 5.13B; 5.24C
Instructional Note:

  • Graphic organizer folded and cut. One space for each geographic region.




ELABORATEPoint of View

Suggested Day 7 (continued) – 20 minutes

  1. Students create a folded graphic organizer to capture the information in the activity in the previous Explore/Explain.

  • Distribute a sheet of unlined paper to each student

  • Students fold the paper in half (hamburger style)

  • Students make 2 cuts on the top half of the paper (see illustration).

  • On the 3 front flaps that have been created, label each with one of the regions: North, South, and West

  • On the inside flap, students write the 5 big ideas they learned for each region, writing within the appropriate “columns.”




  1. Students write a summary of their work explaining how regional loyalty created tension between the north, south, and west.




Materials:

  • Paper (unlined) (1 sheet per student)

Regions

5 Big Ideas



Scissors


TEKS: 5.4B, 5.4C, 5.4F; 5.7A; 5.9A; 5.13A, 5.13B; 5.24C


ELABORATEModifications to a region

Suggested Day 7 (continued) – 10 minutes

  1. Students discuss and summarize the effects of geographic modifications in each geographic area (North, South, and West) and the effects of those modifications on those same areas of the United States today.




  1. Students decide if there could have been better ways, or adaptations instead of modifications to the land that would have caused less damage.




TEKS: 5.4B, 5.4C, 5.4F; 5.7A; 5.9A; 5.13A, 5.13B


EXPLOREMusic and Inspiration

Suggested Day 8 – 35 minutes

  1. Discuss how people strengthen their regional loyalty, or strengthen their spirits and find courage with music. Examples may include school songs, national anthem, songs during time of war, etc.




  1. Display or project the Teacher Resource: Songs From the North.

  • Read the words of the song and ask the following discussion questions:

  • How does this song reflect the North?

  • What is the purpose of this song?




  1. Display or project the Teacher Resource: Songs From the South

  • Read the words of the song and ask the following discussion questions:

  • How does this song reflect the South?

  • What is the purpose of this song?




  1. Display or project the Teacher Resource: Songs From the West

  • Read the words of the song and ask the following discussion questions:

  • How does this song reflect the West?

  • What is the purpose of this song?




Attachments:

  • Teacher Resource: Songs From the North,

  • Teacher Resource: Songs From the South

  • Teacher Resource: Songs From the West


TEKS: 5.4B; 5.21A
Instructional Note:

  • Teachers may choose to sing the songs to the students or play a recording of the song as they students follow along with the words.




EXPLAIN/ELABORATESummary

Suggested Day 8 (continued) – 15 minutes

  1. Students write a paragraph to explain the regional importance of music.




  1. Students participate in a pair-share activity by sharing their summary with a partner.




TEKS: 5.4B; 5.21A


EXPLOREConflict

Suggested Day 9 – 35 minutes

  1. Organize students into groups of 4.




  1. Groups choose a conflict situation with one particular American Indian tribe and another group in the West during the mid-1800s (Examples: farmers, ranchers, soldiers).




  1. Research the problem and the outcomes on the Internet using district-approved websites and other resources from the library.




Materials:

  • access to computer/internet and library


TEKS: 5.4C; 5.9B; 5.24C
Instructional Note:

  • Include in the discussion issues that were important to American Indians such as:

  • Not owning or enclosing land

  • Using up natural resources (bison, trees, clean air and water)

  • Bringing in species not native to the land (strange plants and animals, tumbleweeds)

EXPLAIN/ELABORATE Problem Solve

Suggested Day 9 (continued) – 15 minutes

  1. Using the Handout: Steps in the Problem Solving Process (1 per group), groups work to find a creative solution to the conflict.




  1. Groups complete the Handout: Research on American Indian Conflicts (1 per group).




  1. Students discuss, as a class, what other solutions to conflicts might have been more supportive of the American Indian point of view.




  1. Students answer on an exit card: What problems introduced then are still creating problems today?




Attachments:

  • Handout: Steps in the Problem Solving Process (1 per group)

  • Handout: Research on American Indian Conflicts (1 per group)


TEKS: 5.4C; 5.9B; 5.24C


EVALUATE

Suggested Day 10 – 50 minutes

  • Design a board game based on the settlement of the West. Include geographic factors; regions, states, and territories; economic opportunities; political challenges; and interactions with American Indian groups. (5.4B; 5.7B; 5.13B; 5.25A; 5.26A)

4elps icon 1C, 1E







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