Eurocentrism k – gdi 2013 1nc shell 1nc – Eurocentrism shapes traditional policymaking knowledge production – the state, and democratic processes are universalized and spread with policies like the plan Frankzi,



Download 343.31 Kb.
Page1/146
Date17.05.2021
Size343.31 Kb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   146

Gonzaga Debate Institute 2013

Eurocentrism K





Eurocentrism K – GDI 2013

1NC Shell

1NC – Eurocentrism

Eurocentrism shapes traditional policymaking knowledge production – the state, and democratic processes are universalized and spread with policies like the plan


Frankzi, University of London, Birkbeck College, School of Law, Graduate Student, 12

(Hannah, Center for InterAmerican Studies, Bielefeld University, Universitat Bielefeld, “Eurocentrism,” http://elearning.uni-bielefeld.de/wikifarm/fields/ges_cias/field.php/Main/Unterkapitel52, Accessed: 7/3/13, LPS.)


Researchers contributing to the Latin American Modernidad / Colonialidad research programme have drawn attention to the mythical character of this narrative by arguing that coloniality, understood as a pattern of European violence in the colonies, and modernity need to be understood as two sides of the same coin. They also stress the constitutive role of the “discovery” of the Americas which enables Europe to situate itself at the economic and epistemological centre of the modern world system. The modern idea of universal history, that is the writing of history of humankind in a frame of progressive and linear time, has also been criticised as inherently Eurocentric. This is because it construes the European development as following the normal and necessary course of history and consequently only accommodates the experience of other world regions in relation to it. The construction of the Americas through a European lens is epitomised by the fact that for a long time most accounts of American history started with the arrival of the settlers (Muthyala 2001). Strategies deployed to challenge this Eurocentric master narrative have involved replacing discovery with disaster to stress the violence inherent in the process which was a key part of European modernity.

Geopolitics of Knowledge

In contrast to more localised ethnocentrisms, Eurocentrism shapes the production of knowledge and its proliferation well beyond Europe and the western hemisphere. This is possible, critics argue, due to an epistemology which pretends that knowledge has no locus. In western thought, Descartes' proclamation of a separation of body and mind has led to an image of the cognisant subject as abstracted from all social, sexual and racial realities (Grosfoguel 2006, pp. 20ff, Gandhi 1998: 34ff). In consequence, analytical categories such as state, democracy, equality, etc., formed against the background of particular European experience and are declared to be universally valid and applicable, independent of place (Chakrabarty 2002, p. 288). This leads, according to Edgardo Lander (2002, p. 22), to a naturalisation of liberal values and a devaluation of knowledge produced outside the prescribed scientific system. Europe's successful placing of itself at the centre of history also caused universities outside Europe to teach it from a Eurocentric point of view and include predominantly “northern” thinkers in their academic canons. Postcolonial scholarship has pointed out that knowledge produced in the global South is recognised if the respective academics are working in European or US-American universities (Castro-Gómez 2005, p. 35). As a means to challenge the hegemony of Eurocentric knowledge, indigenous universities have been founded in various Latin American countries. They demand that different ways of knowing be recognised as valid and suggest that indigenous knowledge can inspire new methodologies.




Share with your friends:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   146




The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2020
send message

    Main page