English 1101: Composition and Rhetoric Considering Culture Instructor: Dr. Beth Howells



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ENGLISH 1101: Composition and Rhetoric
Considering Culture


Instructor: Dr. Beth Howells

What is culture? This course will consider the notion of culture from different angles and approaches in order to come to a definition of culture.  This will be the question we will begin and end with in order to chart our awareness, analysis, research, and progress.

Good writing is derived from a dialogic relationship among reading, writing, and thinking.  In other words, reading gives us ideas, inspirations, and models that we think about and then write about.  We read our writing--our thinking translated into words--in order to re-write.  All of these things work together.  In this course, we will study this process and examine our written products in order to make them as effective as possible.  This preparation will prepare you for writing, reading, and thinking in other disciplines in the future.  We will also find ourselves writing for different purposes on different occasions to an academic audience.  While our writing will always be purposeful, we will explore style issues in different circumstances.  We will solve problems, draw conclusions, engage in research, undertake analysis, and reflect on our writing processes over the course of the term.  Our final projects can be viewed as the culmination of our semester’s work. 

REQUIRED TEXTS

Remler, Word by Word


Bundled with Brief Penguin Handbook reference

REQUIREMENTS

  1. Reading.   This class will be reading intensive as much as it is writing intensive.  You will not be successful in this course unless you do all of the reading.  You will be responsible for your reading daily.
     

  2. Informal Writing/ In-Class Reading Responses.  I try to balance the reading load by giving you time to respond to the reading in class.  These will be informal writings on a selected topic or on your assigned reading, and they will be a daily requirement.  They should allow you to work out your ideas for your formal papers.  We will discuss how these should be premeditated, thoughtful, engaged responses. These Daily Grades will constitute 20% of your final grade.
     

  3. Formal Writing: You will be required to write 4 formal papers over the course of the term.  These will be 4-6 page typed, word-processed essays.  These will be worth 20% apiece for a total of 60% of your grade.  You will receive a formal assignment sheet with instructions on how to successfully complete each essay.  These papers must be turned in on time.  Failure to complete one of these essays will constitute failure of the course.
     

  4.  Workshop Participation, Group Work, Class Participation: This course also demands collaboration and group work: we are working on creating a learning community.  This class values revision and will demonstrate that by devoting a significant amount of class time to talking about writing and to talking about your writing specifically in workshops.  This demands that each individual student produce thoughtful and engaged responses to the writing of his or her fellow students in order to make these workshops, indeed this course, successful.  Furthermore, you and your group will work together informally throughout the term.  You are responsible for making contributions to the group work on a daily basis. This course depends on your participation.  Learning only happens when you choose for it to happen.  It only happens when you are engaged and active.  Therefore, you must participate in class discussion.  This will be part of your Daily Grade (see above) which constitutes 20% of your final grade.
     

  5. Conferences and Office Hours.  While you will have one required conference in the course of the term, it would behoove you to take advantage of my office hours and willingness to discuss your writing one-on-one.  Set up an appointment or come to office hours to brainstorm about a paper, consider a draft, or work on editing concerns.
     

  6. Attendance.  Obviously, almost all of your informal writing is done in-class, as is group work and class discussion; therefore, you must be here in order to be successful in this course.  You are allowed four absences.  No excuses.  No penalties.  After four your grade will be dropped a letter per absence; you will be dropped from the course with eight absences.  If you are in class on the phone in any way or sleeping, you will be considered absent since clearly, you are not present.


FINAL GRADES will be based on the following scale:

A=90-100
B=80-89


C=70-79
D=60-69
F=GRADES BELOW 59

PLAGIARISM

Violations of the Honor Code will be handled according to the procedures in the Armstrong Atlantic State University handbook.  Plagiarism will not be tolerated in this class. 


You will be required to complete the plagiarism tutorial on the AASU Lane Library Website by October 1st.  http://library.armstrong.edu/plagiarismtutorial.html Completion of this tutorial will count as a two daily grades.


THE WRITING CENTER

The Writing Center, located in 109 Gamble, can be looked on as an extension of any writing classroom.  I encourage you to take advantage of this free service whenever you are writing a paper or trying to revise one.  Drop in or call an appointment.


Under the Americans with Disabilities Act, AASU provides appropriate and reasonable accommodations to students with documented disabilities.  Documentation and services are available at the Office of Disability Services located in Student Affairs in the MCC.

Students must earn a C or higher in this course to be eligible for English 1102.

SCHEDULE:
This syllabus is subject to revision at the instructor's discretion.

AUGUST
8.14 Introduction to Course


8.16 Introduction (xv-xxv) and Chapter 1: The Writing Process (1-31)
8.21 White, “Once More to the Lake” (260-267); Hughes, “Salvation” (230-232); Walker, “Beauty” (254-260)
8.23 VISTA Sedaris, “The Ship Shape” (30-37); Gilman “Mick Jagger Wants Me” (232-237); Orwell, “Shooting an Elephant” (237-244); discussion chapters 2 and 3
8.28 VISTA Wheaton, “Mom and the Kitchen” (4-8); Casimiro, “Get Off at 161st and Transfer to the Truth” (44-48); Madlock, “Where I’m From” (49-51); Lindgren, “On Being from Fargo” (24-29)
8.30 WORKSHOP; DRAFT DUE

SEPTEMBER


9.4 PAPER 1 DUE; Ethnography activity
9.6 Guterson, “Enclosed, Encyclopedic, Endured” (180-195); Laffey, “Inside Dope” (270-278); Eighner, “On Dumpster Diving” (290-301)
9.11 VISTA  Casassa, “The Coffee Shop” (38-43); Keane, “Structured Chaos” (78-81); Fletcher, “By Dawn’s Early Light” (81-84); Dudley, “The Dope on Head Shops” (102-107)
9.13 PROPOSAL DUE; Chapter 5 (166-180)
9.18  ARTIFACT DUE; Chapter 7 (248-254)
9.20 GLOSSARY DUE; Chapter 8 (284-290)
9.24 INTERVIEW AND FIELD NOTES DUE
9.27 WORKSHOP DRAFT DUE

OCTOBER
10.1 PLAGIARISM TUTORIAL DUE .  http://library.armstrong.edu/plagiarismtutorial.htmlCompletion of this tutorial will count as a two daily grades.


10.2 PAPER 2 DUE/ Culture Clash Exercise
10.3 LAST DAY TO DROP WITH A “W”
10.4 Cabistan, “I am American!” (64-67); Iyer, “Where Worlds Collide” (206-217); Tan, “Mother Tongue” (331-337); VISTA Mellix “Outside In”
10.9 NO CLASS; FALL BREAK
10.11 hooks, “Straightening Our Hair” (79-86); Griffin, “Black Like Me”(193-205); Staples, “Black Men and Public Space” (337-340); Naylor, “Mommy, What Does Nigger Mean?” (423-425)
10.16 Mini-presentations
10.18 WORKSHOP DRAFT DUE
10.23 PAPER 3 DUE
10.25 Pollan, Omnivore’s Dilemma, Pt I

NOVEMBER
10.30 Edge, “I’m Not Leaving” (87-90); Feine, “McBastards” (362-365); Moss, “The Burger” (306-316); VISTA Wallace, “Consider the Lobster”


11.1 Pollan, Omnivore’s Dilemma, Pt II
11.6 LIBRARY DAY
11.10 Pollan, Omnivore’s Dilemma, Pt III
11.13 Pollan, Omnivore’s Dilemma Pt IV
11.15 CONFERENCES
11.20 CONFERENCES
11.22 NO CLASS; THANKSGIVING
11.27 WORKSHOP
11.29 PRESENTATIONS AND BREAKFAST
11.30 FINAL PAPERS DUE BY NOON


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