Elementary latin



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CLASSICS COURSES




FALL 2012

DIVISION OF CLASSICS — MCL.AS.UKY.EDU/CLASSICS

Department of Modern & Classical Languages, Literatures & Cultures

1055 Patterson Office Tower — ph: 257-3761

Director of Undergrad Studies: Ted Higgs (ted.higgs@uky.edu)



CLA 101 ELEMENTARY LATIN-PART 1 STAFF

-001 MTWR 11:00-11:50 -004 MTWR 2:00- 2:50

-002 MTWR 11:00-11:50 -005 MW 3:00-3:50, TR 3:30-4:20

-003 MTWR 2:00- 2:50

This is the first in a four-semester sequence of courses whose purpose is to introduce students to the basic vocabulary, grammar, and conceptual features of the Latin Language. We will also pay attention to the civilization created by the ancient Romans, its literature, art, history, and political institutions. The textbook will be Latin for the New Millennium. UNIVERSITY AND COLLEGE FOREIGN LANGUAGE REQUIREMENTS



CLA 102 ELEMENTARY LATIN-PART 2 HIGGS (ted.higgs@uky.edu)

This is the second in a four-semester sequence of courses whose purpose is to introduce students to the basic vocabulary, grammar, and conceptual features of the Latin Language. We will also pay attention to the civilization created by the ancient Romans, its literature, art, history, and political institutions. Prereq: CLA 101 or equivalent. UNIVERSITY AND COLLEGE FOREIGN LANGUAGE REQUIREMENTS



CLA 131 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY COMPUTER-ASSISTED INSTRUCTION

for additional information, contact PROF. TED HIGGS (ted.higgs@uky.edu)

This course covers Latin and Greek roots, prefixes, suffixes, and principles of word-formation in the technical vocabulary of the health sciences. Primarily for students planning careers in those fields. Class attendance required only three times a semester; students set their own pace and work independently. University computing facilities are used for review, drill, and self-testing. No previous experience with computers expected.





UKCore–Inquiry: Humanities

CLA 135 GREEK & ROMAN MYTHOLOGY

-001 thru -004 lecture TR 2:00- 2:50 VISONA (paolo.visona@uky.edu)

recitation at various times, mainly on FRIDAY, see course schedule

This course familiarizes the student with important characters, themes, and stories of Classical mythology. Equally important is developing an understanding of the nature and purpose of myth, and the ability to derive message and meaning from myth. The course draws upon wide and varied fields of knowledge including literature, history, linguistics, religion, philosophy, and psychology. Each section of the course meets twice a week for a 50 min. large lecture and once a week for a 50 min. recitation period of approx. 30 students. UKCore INQUIRY: HUMANITIES REQUIREMENT and A&S HUMANITIES REQUIREMENTS



CLA 151-001 ELEMENTARY GREEK-PART 1 MW 1:00-1:50; TR 12:30-1:20

T. TUNBERG (terentius_us@yahoo.com)

This course begins the study of ancient Greek for students wishing to read classical prose and poetry and the Greek New Testament. Students start with the alphabet and by the end of the term can read paragraph-length stories and essays in the present tense. After the first three weeks, there is regular opportunity to practice reading short passages of Greek drawn directly from the Greek New Testament; the philosophers Plato and Aristotle; the Homeric Odyssey and Iliad; the poets of Athenian tragedy and comedy; and the Greek historians. Readings are chosen to illustrate ancient Greek culture and ideas; brief anecdotes and discussions as well as occasional pictures augment the study of the textbook and readings. This is the first of a four-course sequence developing a mastery of the rudiments of ancient Greek. UNIVERSITY AND COLLEGE LANGUAGE REQUIREMENTS.



UKCore–Inquiry: Humanities

CLA 191 CHRISTIANITY, CULTURE, & SOCIETY: A HISTORICAL INTRODUCTION

-001 thru -004 lecture MW 12:00-12:50 HUNTER (david.hunter@uky.edu)

recitation at various times on FRIDAY see course schedule

CLA 191 is an historical introduction to the development of Christianity from a social and cultural perspective.  We will study this religious movement from its origin in the first century of the Common Era to its divisions at the time of the Protestant Reformation in the sixteenth century.  A special focus of our study will be the changes undergone by the Christian religion as it moved through different social contexts and different cultural epochs.  It will be our special concern to trace the impact of varying cultural forces (e.g., 1st-century Jewish sectarianism, Greco-Roman philosophical culture, Germanic migrations, medieval feudalism, etc.) on the formation of Christian thought, polity, and religious practice up to the dawn of the modern era. UKCore INQUIRY: HUMANITIES REQUIREMENT and A&S HUMANITIES REQUIREMENTS



CLA 201 INTERMEDIATE LATIN-PART 1

-001 MWF 10:00-10:50 STAFF -003 MWF 12:00-12:50 STAFF

-002 MWF 11:00-11:50 STAFF -003 MWF 1:00- 1:50 STAFF

This is the third in a four-semester sequence of courses whose purpose is to introduce students to the basic vocabulary, grammar, and conceptual features of the Latin language. The course will be dedicated to reading masterpieces of Latin literature throughout the centuries and learning not only about the Latin language and literature, but also about their impact on every part of the Western civilization. Our textbook will be Volume II of Latin for the New Millennium. UNIVERSITY AND COLLEGE LANGUAGE REQUIREMENTS



CLA 202 INTERMEDIATE LATIN- PART 2 MWF 2:00-2:50 J. TUNBERG (jtunberg@yahoo.com)

This is the fourth in a four-semester sequence of courses whose purpose is to introduce students to the basic vocabulary, grammar, and conceptual features of the Latin Language. We will also pay attention to the civilization created by the ancient Romans, its literature, art, history, and political institutions, as well as to its impact on practically every part of the Western world. Prereq: CLA 201 or equivalent. UNIVERSITY AND COLLEGE FOREIGN LANGUAGE REQUIREMENTS


CLA 210 THE ART OF GREECE AND ROME TR 11:00-12:15 VISONA (paolo.visona@uky.edu)
This course begins with a substantial look at the Bronze Age cultures of Minoan Crete and Mycenae, then studies the gradual flowering of Greek creative genius in the Archaic, Classical, and Hellenistic periods, and culminates with a brief look at Roman art through the time of the emperor Augustus. Our main focus will be on the social, religious, and political aspects of ancient art, whether we are considering major imperial monuments such as the Parthenon in Athens and the Altar of Peace in Rome, or objects intended for private enjoyment such as Greek vases or Pompeian wall paintings. A&S HUMANITIES REQUIREMENTS
GRAD STUDENTS WHO NEED LATIN TAKE NOTE

CLA 211(011) ACCELERATED LATIN TR 12:30-1:45 MINKOVA (mmink2@uky.edu)

A systematic, grammar-focused course leading to basic competency in Latin, aimed at graduate students who need a reading knowledge of the language or anyone eager for a fast, thorough, highly disciplined review or introduction. THIS COURSE PLUS ONE FOLLOW-UP LATIN READING COURSE WILL FULFILL THE UNIVERSITY AND COLLEGE LANGUAGE REQUIREMENTS AND GRADUATE SCHOOL READING KNOWLEDGE REQUIREMENT.

No prerequisite.

UKCore–Inquiry: Humanities

CLA/HIS 229 THE ANCIENT NEAR EAST & GREECE MWF 10:00-10:50 HOLLE (bholl2@uky.edu)

A survey of the history of Egypt, Western Asia, and Greece from the beginnings of civilization around 3000 B.C. to the death of Alexander the Great in 323 B.C. Through lectures and readings the class will examine the cultures of these regions, how each developed, and the ways they interacted with each other and influenced their neighbors. UKCore INQUIRY: HUMANITIES REQUIREMENT and A&S HUMANITIES REQUIREMENTS



CLA 251 INTERMEDIATE GREEK-PART 1 MWF 9:00-9:50 CLARK (clark.jamestown@gmail.com)

Review of grammatical principles together with readings from Greek prose and poetry. Selections from a wide range of authors will be included in order to demonstrate the diversity and appeal of Greek literature. Emphasis is placed on developing reading ability. Prereq: CLA 152 or equivalent. UNIVERSITY AND COLLEGE LANGUAGE REQUIREMENTS



CLA 301 LATIN LITERATURE I: EARLY CHRISTIAN LATIN LITERATURE

MWF 2:00-2:50 HUNTER (david.hunter@uky.edu)

Reading of selected texts from Latin writers of the third through sixth centuries. A variety of genres will be studied, including apologetics, hagiography, preaching, poetry, martyrology, and heresiology.


2nd-Tier Graduation Writing Requirement

CLA 331 GENDER & SEXUALITY IN ANTIQUITY TR 11:00-12:15 PM FRANCIS (j.francis@uky.edu)

This course examines how gender, sexuality, and the social institutions and patterns connected with these operated in ancient Greece and Rome. Essential is the concept of the social construction of gender and sexuality, i.e., that far from being set in biological concrete, different societies have understood, organized, deployed, and exploited gender and sexuality in radically different ways. In this way, classical antiquity can serve as a basis for both understanding and critiquing our own society, and it is a fundamental aim of this course to engage the student's own thought, criticism, judgment, and actively construct knowledge from the sources and scholarly interpretive frameworks. 2nd-TIER UNIVERSITY WRITING REQUIREMENT & A&S HUMANITIES REQUIREMENTS


CLA/HIS 390-401 BACKGROUNDS TO & EARLY HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY TO 150 CE

W 6:00-8:30PM HOLLE (bholl2@uky.edu)

This course will investigate the historical and cultural background to the rise of Christianity. Readings and discussion will center on the Greek, Roman and Hebrew contributions to early Christianity. A&S HUMANITIES REQUIREMENTS


CLA 350 PREPARING TO READ GREEK TEXTS TR 9:30-10:45 PHILLIPS (claphil@uky.edu)

Study of an author (e.g. Plato), a work (e.g. the Iliad), or a topic (e.g. prose syntax and style). All readings are in Greek. May be repeated to a maximum of 12 credits with different topics. Prereq: CLA 252 or equivalent, and consent of director of undergraduate studies and instructor.



CLA 450G TOPICS IN CLASSICAL STUDIES: MAGIC IN THE ANCIENT WORLD

TR 9:30-10:45 HIGGS (ted.higgs@uky.edu)

This special topics class will investigate the notion and practice of magic in the Greek and Roman worlds. The first half of the course will be involved with examining methodological approaches to magic; the development of Greek magic in the classical period; binding magic, curse tablets, and erotic spells; incantations; and Greek and Roman legal and cultural responses to magic. As we move towards a look at magic in the Roman world, we will investigate Greco-Roman and early Christian concepts of magic; daimons and angels; divine power; ghosts, necromancy, and witchcraft.



CLA 501 LATIN COMPOSITION TR 9:30-10:45 MINKOVA (mmink2@uky.edu)

The course is designed for students with a good command of Latin morphology and basic knowledge of Latin syntax. The participants will deepen their knowledge of Latin syntax, internalize the principles of Latin grammar and usage, and develop a sensitivity to prose style. The course will involve readings from Latin authors from all periods, and exercises in Latin prose composition. It will foster familiarization with the language through exercises that will go beyond simple translation from English. English, not Latin, will be the spoken language used in this course. Prereq: Proficiency in Latin above the 300 level.



CLA 525/625 LATIN LITERATURE OF THE EMPIRE: LIVY AND THE EARLY HISTORY OF ROME TR 12:30-1:45 PHILLIPS (claphil@uky.edu)

After Aeneas settled in Italy, as Vergil tells us, what happened next?  Livy had the answers.  This course will explore his report of the foundation of the Roman city and the Roman republic in Books 1 and 2 and other selections from books 3-5 of the Ab urbe condita. Special attention will be on Livy’s analysis of what makes the Romans Roman, and on his linguistic and dramatic craftsmanship. Course work will include developing Latin reading skills and practicing scholarly research, writing, and presentation.  Differentiated requirements for graduate and undergraduate students.




CLA 555/655 GREEK PROSE: PLATO, PROTAGORAS & PHAEDRUS

MWF 10:00-10:50 RABEL (rrabel@uky.edu)

Socrates often claims that the proper duty of an individual is coming to know himself or herself. Using the Cambridge Greek and Latin Texts series of texts and commentaries, we will read Plato’s Protagoras and Phaedrus, playing particular attention to the self-knowledge theme in these two dialogues.



CLA 580 INDEPENDENT WORK IN CLASSICS (3 credits)

TBA HIGGS (ted.higgs@uky.edu) or MINKOVA (mmink2@uky.edu)

Advanced independent work. To take this course, undergraduates must consult with and be approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies; Graduate Students must consult with and be approved by the Director of Graduate Studies.
CLA 611 LATIN OF ANCIENT ROME AND THE MIDDLE AGES: CICERO, DE ORATORE

MWF 4:00-4:50 T. TUNBERG (terentius_us@yahoo.com)

Participants in this course will explore Cicero's mature thoughts on the art of oratory and the essence of eloquence, especially as highlighted in his masterful dialogue De oratore. The course will be based on preparation of assigned texts, class discussion, research projects and papers. Latin is the language of this course.



CLA 695 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-3 credits) TBA MINKOVA (mmink2@uky.edu)

Advanced independent work for graduate students. Students must consult with and be approved by the Director of Graduate Studies.
CLA 790 RESEARCH IN THE TEACHING OF CLASSICAL LANGUAGES (3 credits)
 COURSES IN OTHER DEPARTMENTS

HIS 706 SEMINAR IN MEDIEVAL HISTORY: MEDIEVAL INTERPRETATIONS OF

SCRIPTURE T 3:30-6:30 FIREY (afire2@uky.edu)

The impact of religious thought on the development of western institutions and society is revealed in the texts that interpret the monumental writings -- especially sacred scriptures-- of western culture.   Political thought, law, literature, art, education, and popular culture were all infused with scriptural knowledge, as filtered through interpretative traditions. This seminar examines the long tradition of such exegetical works, from those of Origen (3rd century) to the prison meditations of Girolamo Savonarola (15th century), with special attention to the post-Augustinian exegetes of the seventh to thirteenth centuries.  There will be some attention to differences between Christian, Jewish, and Islamic interpretative traditions, and also to non-biblical material that attracted extensive commentary.  By studying the methods, sources, motives, and influence of medieval exegetes, we can also learn much about medieval perspectives on language and reading techniques, and about the changing connotations of words and imagery in medieval Latin.  Students interested in working with unpublished manuscript materials will have instructional support.  Reading knowledge of Latin (with dictionary) is required.


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