Editor’s Note: The Department of Revenue recodified this Chapter at 6 A. A. R. 2308, filed in the Office of the Secretary of State June 2, 2000



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Historical Note

Recodified at 6 A.A.R. 2308, filed in the Office of the Secretary of State June 2, 2000 (Supp. 00-2). Amended by final rulemaking at 7 A.A.R. 2885, effective June 13, 2001 (Supp. 01-2).

ARTICLE 2. GENERAL ACCOUNTING PROVISIONS

R15-2A-201. Repealed

Historical Note

Recodified at 6 A.A.R. 2308, filed in the Office of the Secretary of State June 2, 2000 (Supp. 00-2). Repealed by final rulemaking at 7 A.A.R. 2885, effective June 13, 2001 (Due to clerical error Section not shown as repealed until Supp. 08-4).

R15-2A-202. Items not Deductible in Computing Taxable Income

A. Personal and family expenses. Insurance paid on a dwelling owned and occupied by a taxpayer is a personal expense and not deductible. Premiums paid for life insurance by the insured are not deductible. In the case of a professional man who rents a property for residential purposes but incidentally receives clients, patients, or caller there in connection with his professional work (his place of business being elsewhere), no part of the rent is deductible as a business expense. However, if he uses part of the house for his office, such portion of the rent as is properly attributable to such office is deductible. If the father is entitled to the services of his minor children, any allowances that he gives them whether said to be in consideration of services or otherwise are not allowable deductions in his return of income. Generally, attorneys’ fees paid in a suit for divorce or separate maintenance are not deductible. However, the part of an attorney’s fee paid in a divorce or separate maintenance proceeding that is properly attributable to the production or collection of amounts of includible in gross income is deductible. Amounts paid as alimony or allowance for support on divorce or separation are not deductible except as otherwise provided. The cost of equipment of an Army officer to the extent only that it is especially required by his profession and does not merely take the place of articles required in civilian life is deductible. Accordingly, the cost of a sword is an allowable deduction, but the cost of a uniform is not. See Section 43-1049 for deduction of extraordinary medical expenses including amounts paid for accident or health insurance.

B. Amounts allocable to non-includible income

1. Class of non-includible income

a. This Section applies to income that is not required to be included in Arizona adjusted gross income or Arizona taxable income. Examples of such non-includible income would be interest exempt from the Arizona income tax by the Constitution or federal or state law, or the income of a corporation which was derived from sources outside this state. The fact that a person’s otherwise taxable income may be reduced by allowable deductions and personal exemptions will not render such income subject to this provision.

b. The object is to segregate non-includible income from the taxable income in order that a double exemption may not be obtained through the reduction of taxable income by expenses and other items incurred in the production of items of non-includible income. Accordingly, just as certain items of income are excluded from the computation of Arizona gross income and Arizona taxable income by Sections 43-1022 and 43-1122, Section 43-961 excludes from the computation of deductions all items referable to the production of non-includible income as above defined.

2. Determination of amounts allocable to a class of exempt income

a. No deduction may be allowed for the amount of any item or part thereof allocable to a class or classes of exempt income, or other income not includible in Arizona adjusted gross income or Arizona taxable income.

Example: Expenses paid or incurred for the production or collection of income that is wholly exempt from income taxes such as interest or dividends of a type not includible in gross income are not deductible expenses. Items or parts of such items directly attributable to any class or classes of exempt income shall be allocated to that, and items or parts of such items directly attributable to any class or classes of taxable income shall not be allocated to that.

b. If an item is indirectly attributable both to taxable income and to non-includible income, a reasonable proportion of it determined in the light of the facts and circumstances in each case shall be allocated to each. Apportionments must in all cases be reasonable.

3. Statement of items of non-includible incomes-records

a. A taxpayer receiving any class of non-includible income or holding any property or engaging in any activity the income from which is non-includible shall submit with his return as a part of it an itemized statement in detail showing:

i. the amount of each class of such non-includible income and

ii. the amount of items or parts of items allocated to each such class (the amount allocated by apportionment being shown separately) as required by subsection (B)(2) of this subsection.

b. If an item is apportioned between a class of non-includible income and a class of taxable income, the statement shall show the basis of the apportionment.

Such statement shall also recite that each deduction claimed in the return is not in any way referable to non-includible income.




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