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Henry Billingsley married Elizabeth, daughter of ruling

elder William Gowdy, in 1785. He lived on Mears Fork.


Charles Bland was living on North Buffalo in 1795.
James Boyd was living on North Buffalo in 1807.
John Boyd was living on Reedy Fork in 1759.
Bennet Bradford was living on the north side of South Buf-

falo in 1781.


James Brittain lived on Horsepen Creek in 1760.
William Brown was living on North Buffalo in 1757.
James Carter located on Horsepen Creek in 1753.

[86]

Other Families 87
John Caruthers was living in Greensboro in 1837. He was

the executor of the will of Dr. Eli W. Caruthers, and must have

been a near kinsman.
Leven Caulk w^as living on Mears Fork before 1800. He

must have been the father of Benitha, who married Evans

Wharton in 1808.
Samuel Coban, of York County, Pa., located on Reedy Fork

in 1773. In 1784 he returned to Pennsylvania.


Eobert Coker was living on North Buffalo in 1771.
William Covey was living a short distance north of the

church in 1785.


Thomas Craft was living on North Buffalo in 1800.
Robert Craig was living three miles north of the church dur-

ing the Revolutionary War,


Jeremiah Deans was living on North Buffalo in 1840, and

contributed to the support of the church.


John Dickey was living three miles northeast of the church

in 1790.


Andrew Dilling lived just west of the church in 1827.
Daniel Dillon located on the Reedy Fork in 1759.
Nathan Dillon was living just west of the church in 1780.
Samuel Duff was living on the north side of South Buffalo

in 1780.


Moses Elliott was living on North Buffalo in 1796.
Joseph Fleming, of Rockingham County, located just west

of the church in 1797. He married Sarah Covey in 1799.


Dr. Abner Forbis lived on the Reedy Fork. His obituary

notice in the Patriot of 1835 says he and family were Presby-

terians.
Dr. John A. Foulks was living on the Reedy Fork in 1830,

and contributed to the support of the church.


Samuel Fulton lived four or five miles northeast of the church

in 1787.


Thomas Gault was living on North Buffalo in 1780.

88 History of Buffalo Preshyteria^t Church and Her People


Thomas Green was living on the Keedy Fork in 1775.
David Gorrell was living on South Buffalo, and paid on the

salary of the pastor in 1847.


Moses Griffin was living between Buffalo and Reedy Fork in

1799.
John Hayes was living on the Reedy Fork in 1774.


Nathan Hill was living on the Reedy Fork in 1793. He

must have been the ancestor of Wilson Shed Hill, who was post-

master in Greensboro in 1846.
William Hindman was living on North Buffalo in 1772.
Ezekiel Hobbs was living on Hunting Creek in 1799.
Solomon Holden was living on North Buffalo in 1845, and

paid on the salary of the Buffalo pastor.


Edward Holland was living on Richland Creek in 1778.
Isaac Holt and his wife Mary, of Orange County, located on

North Buffalo in 1814 and united with Buffalo.


J. B. Houston was living on South Buffalo in 1850, and paid

on the salary of the Buffalo pastor.


Alfred Ingold located on the headwaters of North Buffalo

in 1844.


James Johnston was living between Reedy Fork and Buffalo

in 1771.


William Kennady was living between Buffalo and Reedy

Fork in 1772.


Calvin King married Ruth, daughter of Major John Donnell,

in 1831, and became identified with Buffalo.


John Kirkpatrick was living on North Buffalo in 1756.
Isham and John Lanier were living two or three miles north-

west of the church in 1784. Sidney Lanier, the poet, is a

descendant of John.
William H. Lane lived near the church and paid on salary

in 1861.


John Larkin was living between Buffalo and Reedy Fork in

1779. He had been brought to this county by Robert Donnell,

Sr.

Other Families 89


James Leeper was living on Reedy Fork in 1775. In 1784

he returned to Cumberland County, Pennsylvania.


General John M. Logan (1797-1853) was born in Ireland,

and came to Greensboro in 1821. He married Mrs. Nancy Dick

Patrick in 1825, widow of Andrew Patrick and daughter of

Thomas Dick. His wife and several children are buried in

Buffalo cemetery.
Thomas Dick, Sr., was associated with Buffalo, and several

of his children are buried in the Buffalo cemetery.


Adam Loman was living on North Buffalo in 1850, and paid

on the salary of the pastor.


William IMcElhattan was living between Buffalo and Reedy

Fork before the Revolutionary War. His family moved to

Tennessee in 1790.
Edward McGlamery was living north of the church in 1780.
Robert Mclntire was living on the Reedy Fork in 1778. In

1809 John Mclntire was ordained to the ministry by Orange

Presbytery, and he may have been a son of Robert.
Thomas McRarey was living near Martinsville in 1785.
James Minor was living between North and South Buffalo

in 1840, and paid on the salary of the pastor.


Thomas Monjoy was living two miles north of the church

in 1795.


David Montgomery was living on Richland Creek in 1780.

His family moved to Grayson County, Va., in 1819.


William Montgomery lived on Buffalo Creek nine miles east

of the church, before the Revolutionary War, in which he was

a soldier. His children intermarried with members of Buffalo,

and they must have been members of the congregation.


Alexander Moody was living on Horsepen Creek in 1773.
John H. Moore was living on North Buffalo in 1808. His

land adjoined the church land.


Smith Moore was living at Martinsville in 1785. He married

Mary, a daughter of Capt. William Dent, Sr.


William Moreland was living on North Buffalo in 1775.

90 History of Buffalo Presbyterian Church and Her People


James Morgan was living on North Buffalo in 1796.
Thomas Morgan was living a few miles northeast of the

church in 1770. He was sheriff of the county in 1772. In 1794

he moved away.
Christopher Moring ran a tavern in Greensboro in 1833, and

had a pew rented in Buffalo Church.


Jesse Needham was living on North Buffalo in 1775.
Joseph Newman was living on North Buffalo in 1788.
Richard Ozment was living on South Buffalo in 1786.
J. W. Parker was living on North Buffalo in 1833. His son is

buried in Buffalo cemetery.


George Parks was living on North Buffalo in 1780.
John Patterson was living on North Buffalo in 1757.
Rees Porter lived on Buffalo eight miles east of the church

in 1775, and was closely identified with the Buffalo people. He

moved to Tennessee in 1787.
James Ramsey was living on North Buffalo in 1802.
William Reed kept a tavern at Llartinsville in 1784. Opie P.

Reade, journalist and novelist, formerly of Tennessee, but now

of Chicago, says his father was born at the Guilford Battle

Ground, so he must be a descendant of William. Henry Reed

married Agnes Bell in 1766 and located on Hunting Creek, He

may have been the father of William.


William Robertson located on Hunting Creek in 1758. He

was in the Battle of the Regulators in 1771.


Will Rogers was living on Hunting Creek in 1784. It is

possible that he may be the ancestor of Will Rogers, the humor-

ist, now living in California.
Samuel Short was living on Hunting Creek in 1782.
Edward Simms was living on Reedy Fork in 1800. He mar-

ried Isabella Cunningham.


Sanford M. Simpson located one mile north of the church

in 1844, and his name is on the list of those who paid on the sal-

ary of the pastor.

Other Families 91


Joseph T. Smith lived north of the church in 1860, and paid

on the salary.


Thomas Steerman located three miles northeast of the church

in 1796.


John Stewart, Jr., son of John of Benaja, located on the

south side of Reedy Fork in 1787.


Robert Tate was living on North Buffalo in 1764. Robert

Tate was ordained to the ministry by Orange Presbytery in

1799, and he may have been a son of this Robert, Sr.
James E. Thom was living in Greensboro in 1840, and paid

on the salary of the Buffalo pastor.


James Tomlinson was living on Reedy Fork in 1790.
P. C. Tooley was living on North Buffalo in 1817.
Jonas Touchstone was living on North Buffalo in 1775. He

died in 1815.


William Trousdale was living on the headwaters of North

Buffalo in 1764.


Ansel Valient was living just west of the church in 1796.
Miles Wagstaff was living on North Buffalo in 1856 and
paid on the salary of the pastor.
Adam Walker was living on South Buffalo in 1784.
David Walker was living near Martinsville in 1771.
Abraham Whitesides located on Reedy Fork in 1762. He

married a daughter of Robert Thompson, and his daughter

married James Cannon, the grandfather of Congressman Joseph

Gr. Cannon.


Samuel Williams was living on North Buffalo in 1845, and

paid on the pastor's salary.


Col. Nehemiah Whittington, the son of Joseph, located near

the Battle Ground in 1830. Some of his children were members

of Buffalo Church.
Ezekiel Wiggins was living on North Buffalo in 1778.
James Whitt paid on the salary of the Buffalo pastor in 1847.
Joel Willis was living on Horsepen Creek in 1798.

92 History of Buffalo Presbyterian Church and Her People


William Willis located on the south side of North Buffalo

in 1787.


Francis Wright was living on Horsepen Creek in 1778.
Robert Wright was living near Martinsville in 1778.
It is not claimed that all these were members of Buffalo, but

as Buffalo was their nearest church they must have attended

the services there, and some of them were members. But few

of these families remained in North Carolina.


WITNESSES AT THE TRIALS


We are giving here a list of those whose names appear in

connection with the many church trials. The only record we

have before 1833 is the record of these trials, and that is not

complete. The dates on these records run from 1773 to 1796,

and the minutes for some of these years are lost. This list is

given to show the extensive bounds of the congregation, and the

large number connected with the church. Most of these were

members of the church, and all must have been members of the

congregation. Buffalo had large congregations in those early

years. In 1779 it had a bench of seven ruling elders.

Allison, Alexander

Allison, John

Anderson, Robert

Barney, William

Barr, James

Bedford, James

Bell, Mrs. Margaret

Bell, Capt. Robert

Bell, Samuel

Billingsley, James

Black, Thomas

Blair, Jane

Blair, Thomas

Brawley, John

Brawley, Martha

Brawley, Ruth

Breeden, Charles

Breden, Mrs. Margaret

Brown, Thomas

Brown, widow

Burney, Charles

Burney, Mrs. Catherine

Burney, Elizabeth

Burney, Jane

Burney, John


Burney, Mary

Burney, Robert

Burney, William

Campbell, James

Campbell, Major John

Chambers, John

Christopher, Mrs. Jane

Christopher, John

Coots, James

Coots, Mrs. Mary

Craig, Elizabeth

Craig, Robert

Culver, Thomas

Cummins, Francis

Cunningham, Hugh

Davis, Elizabeth

Denny, George

Denny, James

Dent, William, Sr.

Dent, Mrs. William

Dent, William, Jr.

Dick, William

Donaho, William

Donnell, Andrew

Donnell, George


[93]

94 History of Buffalo Presbyterian Church and Her People

Donnell, Major John

Donnell, Robert

Donnell, Thomas

Donnell, William

Donnell, William, Jr.

Duck, Samuel

Duff, Samuel

Duff, William

Erwin, Joseph

Erwin, Sarah

Erwin, a widow

Forbis, Arthur

Gillespie, Col. Daniel

Gillespie, Col. John

Gillespie, Mrs. Margaret

Good, Mary

Gowdy, William

Hamilton, John

Hamilton, William

Hindmon, Mrs. Rebecca

Hindmon, Thomas

Hindmon, William

Holland, Edward

Kennady, William

Larkin, John

Leckey, Martha

Lindsay, Thomas

Logan, Mary

McClintock, John, Sr.

McClintock, John, Jr.

McDowell, Joseph

I\IcElhattan, Abraham

McElhattan, WiUiam

McGlamery, Edward ^•

McGurdy, Thomas

Mclntire, Robert

McKnight, Mrs. Katherine

BIcMichael, Archibald

McMichael, Charity

McMurray, John

McNairy, Francis


McNairy, James

McQuiston, John

McQuiston, Moses

McQuiston, Walter

McRarey, Hugh

McRarey, Thomas

Mitchell, Adam

Mitchell, Elizabeth

Mitchell, Mary

Montgomery, Elizabeth

Montgomery, Mrs. Hannah

Montgomery, Hannah

Montgomery, Mary

Moreland, Catherine

Moreland, Elizabeth

Morrow, Samuel

Nicks, Quinton

Orr, John

Parks, George

Pennal, Ervan

Porter, Reese

Rankin, John

Rankin, Rebecca

Ross, Henry

Ross, James

Russell, William

Scott, William

Starrett, James

Thompson, Samuel

Tosy, Alexander

Tosy, Martha

Tosy, Sarah

Touchstone, Jonas

Walker, John

Warnick, Eva

Warnick, Robert

White, Jane

Woodal, Elizabeth

Wright, Robert

Yancey, Phillip

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CHURCH GROUNDS


The first plot of church land was bought October 16, 1768,

from Adam Mitchell for twenty shillings. The deed was made

to John McKnight and William Anderson, trustees, and it is on

record in Rowan County. The deed reads, "One acre of land

for the use of a Presbyterian meeting house to those that are

members of the Synod of Philadelphia in Pennsylvania, and

the New York Synod, and to that use forever. Beginning at

a stake on the William Anderson's line, thence running 16

perches west to a stake, thence south 10 perches to a stake,

thence east 16 perches to said Anderson's line, thence north

along his line 10 perches to the beginning, including the meeting

house and study house." Thomas Donnell and John Mitchell

were the witnesses. The east end of this plot was between the

present building and the east gate, the north side was where

the rock wall stands, the west end was near where the new rock

wall stands, and the south side was near the present second walk

in the rear of the present building.


The second deed on record is dated September 20, 1827. and

was made by Nathaniel Kerr, Adam, Samuel and John Mitchell

and John and Robert Caldwell, executors of Dr. David Cald-

well, to David Woodburn, Samuel Donnell, Jr., Robert Don-

nell, Jr., and Edmond Donnell, trustees. "Beginning at a stone

north of the grave yard, running west 4 chains and 25 links

to a stone, then south 6 chains and 20 links to a stone, then east

4 chains and 25 links to a persimmon tree, then north to the

beginning, containing two and three-fourth acres."
The third deed on record is dated 1850, and is made by

Samuel M. Kerr to Samuel Hatrick, trustee of Buffalo Church.

"Beginning at a stone near the southeast corner of the grave

yard, thence south 19 poles and 10 links to a persimmon tree in

Samuel Kerr's line, thence west 18 poles to a stone in the Greens-

boro road, thence north 19 poles and 10 links to a stone, thence

east 18 poles to the first station, containing 2 acres and 30

poles."

[95]

96 History of Buffalo Presbyterian Church and Her People


The fourth deed is dated July 7, 1860, and was made by Rob-

ert C. Donnell to Samuel Denny, trustee of Buffalo Church.

"Beginning at a stone near the northeast corner of the present

grave yard, thence east 10 poles and 6 links to a stone, thence

south 16 poles and 20 links to a stone, thence west 6 poles to a

stone, thence south 19 poles and 17 linlvs to a stone, thence west

4 poles and 6 links to a stone (the old corner of the church land,

also Samuel Kerr's corner), thence north with the old line of the

church land to the first station 35 poles and 12 links, contain-

ing two and one-half acres." The church paid twenty dollars

for this last lot.
It appears from these records that there should be another

deed, which has not been found on record, for one acre of land

lying just south of the acre first bought.

/•>»%«j

m^

Church Building, Erected 1827


CHURCH BUILDINGS


The first church building stood inside the present cemetery,

and near the northwest corner. It was just west of the old

rock wall and east of the new wall. It was built of logs, as were

all the homes in that early day. It must have been built about

the time the church was organized in 1756. These people were

intent on having a church, and began the erection of a building

at the earliest possible opportunity after getting settled here.

The first church lot was bought in 1768, and included the

"meeting house and study house". The ''study house" was

what was later called the "session house".
The second church was a large frame building, and stood

near the southwest corner of the present cemetery. We have

no description of it on record, but Dr. Calvin H. Wiley (1819-

1887) has given a description of the Alamance building as he

remembered it, which was erected near the same time as the one

at Buffalo, and under the leadership of the same pastor and for

a congregation of about the same size, and by a people who were

equal in wealth to the Alamance people. This second Buffalo

building must have been very much the same in architecture as

the one at Alamance. Dr. Wiley describes Alamance as a large

frame building painted dark yellow, with four doors and over

each door an ornamental portico ; there were many large win-

dows. The gallery extended along one side and across both ends

and was reached by two stairways. The pulpit was located in

the center of one side and the pulpit platform was about eight

feet high, which was reached by a stairway with a balustrade.

Over the pulpit was an ornamental sounding board. In front

of the pulpit was another platform for the clerk who led the

singing. This platform was five feet high. The building would

seat 900 or 1,000 people, "and it was generally pretty well

filled."
By a little use of the imagination we can see the old Buffalo

building and the teeming multitudes who covered these grounds

on the Sabbath day. Remember that the bounds of Buffalo

congregation covered a territory of at least eighteen miles square,


[97]

98 History of Buffalo Presbyterian Church and Her People


and that there was no other church in these bounds until about

the year 1800.


The third building is the one now in use. At a congrega-

tional meeting in May, 1826, it was decided to erect a new

building, and the following committee was appointed to raise the

necessary money and to supervise its erection: Major Robert

Donnell, John W. Caldwell, Robert Moderwell, Henry Hum-

phreys and Col. William T. Shields. Dr. Eli W, Caruthers, the

pastor, was ex officio, a member of the committee. The com-

mittee was instructed not to allow the cost to exceed two thou-

sand dollars.
At a congregational meeting, June 10, 1826, the committee

reported that they had a bid to erect the new building complete,

without furniture, for the old church building and twenty-four

hundred dollars ; and the committee was instructed to proceed,

but not to exceed the twenty-four hundred dollars. Robert

Moderwell resigned from the committee and John Rankin was

elected in his place.
At a congregational meeting, December 30, 1826, it appears

that the committee had failed to secure enough money to pay for

the erection of the new building as they had planned it, and the

question was, "Will the congregation pledge itself for what

may be necessary to finish the building." The pledge was made

and the committee ordered to proceed. It was also decided to

build a gallery across the south end, and to build a door in the

east wall, and a stairway from that door leading to the gallery.

It appears from this that the church walls were not yet erected

on December 30th, 1826.


The contract was let to Jacob Albright, and he was to com-

plete the new building in a neat and durable manner for the

sum of $2,400 and the old church building. Mr. Albright

employed Joseph Kirkpatrick to assist him with the building.

The brick were made on a lot just west of the church. They

were moulded by hand and well burnt, and a substantial build-

ing was erected. The walls stand today (1934) just as good as

when first erected. The building is 60 feet long and 40 feet

wide. The pulpit was placed at the northern end. Ten feet of

the front of the auditorium was partitioned off for a vestibule.

A gallery, which was reserved for the colored people, was built

across the front end. It was originally planned to build gal-


Church Buildings 99


leries on both sides the full length of the auditorium, but this

was never done. The building was amply high for this, and

smaller windows were placed over the large ones to give light

and ventilation to the galleries when they should be built.


The building must have been completed during 1827, for at

the next congregational meeting on January 16, 1828, it was

decided not to buy new furniture, but to adjust the pews of the

old building and have them placed in the new church. John

Rankin, Samuel Mitchell and Thomas Denny were appointed a

committee to have this done. The first service in this church

must have been shortly after January 16, 1828. So far as the

writer has been able to ascertain this was the first brick church




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