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BATTLE OF THE SOMME

Date: July 1st – November 18th 1916

DESCRIPTION:


INTERESTING FACTS:

  • The battle of Beaumont Hamel was over for the Newfoundlanders in less than half an hour.

  • Over 60 000 of the allied forces died on the FIRST DAY of this battle.

  • Tanks were first used on the battlefields during the Battle of The Somme.

  • Adolf Hitler was present as a soldier during the Battle of the Sommes.



The battle of the Somme was meant to be a breakthrough, the battle that would change the war, but it ended as nothing other than slaughter. It was one of the largest battles during the Great War, and still holds a place as one of the “bloodiest” military operations ever recorded. It was also the first great offensive for the British. The battle of the Somme began as a way to break through the German defences and cut a path straight to Berlin. However, because Germany found out the plans of the British they were prepared. Many of the troops that belonged to the

“Triple Entente” were forced to go over the top,

and charge for the German defenses while climbing

over the bodies of their friends and

family. While in mud, rain, and towards the winter

months, the cold as well. Ended in a stalemate




OUTCOME:

The battle of the Somme ultimately ended in a stalemate, nothing really changed. However at the time, both sides called this battle a “bloodbath” and a “bloody hell.”



CASULATIES:

  • British 415,000,

  • French 195,000,

  • Germans perhaps 450,000-600,000

  • Canadian 24,029

CANADIAN INVOLVMENT:

The 1st Newfoundland Regiment played a key part in the Battle of the Somme. They were ordered to assist the 87th brigade in the small village of Beaumont-Hamel in France. The objective was to break through the German defense and officially begin the Battle of The Somme. However, because the opposing force was prepared, the 801 men were set for death. They were told all they would have to do is march across no man’s land, kill any remaining, disoriented German troops and take over the trenches. The Germans, as I mentioned before, were anticipating the attack, and then proceeded to shoot down 1st Newfoundland Reg. Out of the 801 men that walked bravely into battle 733 of the 1st Newfoundland Regiment were killed or wounded.





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